01 Sep 2012
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An Intellectual Capital: Some Influential HBS Ideas, at a Glance

by Professor Elton Mayo: Professor Fritz Roethlisberger; George M. Moffett Professor of Agriculture and Business, Professor Emeritus Ray A. Goldberg; Professor Abraham Zaleznik; Professor Alfred Chandler; Professor Michael Porter; Professor Robert S. Kaplan; Professor Michael C. Jensen; Professor C. Roland Christensen; Professor Robert Menton

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1911

HBS establishes the Bureau of Business Research to write cases.

1922

Founding of Harvard Business Review (HBR).

1930s

Elton Mayo and Fritz Roethlisberger conduct pioneering studies establishing the importance of field-based industrial research as Mayo’s The Human Problems of an Industrial Civilization (1933) and Roethlisberger’s Management and the Worker (1939) document.

1948

Research Center in Entrepreneurial History launched at HBS by Harvard economist Joseph Schumpeter and Baker Librarian Arthur Cole.

1953

More than 30 foreign educational institutions request HBS assistance in setting up business schools.

1957

With his book A Concept of Agribusiness, Ray Goldberg (with John Davis) coins a term and defines an industry.

1958

Ken Andrews begins writing cases on the Swiss watch industry that lay the groundwork for the concept and rise of corporate strategy in business thinking.

1960

In “Marketing Myopia” in HBR, Ted Levitt (below) famously asks “What business are you in?” and insists that customer focus be paramount.

1977

Abraham Zaleznik raises a provocative, game-changing question in “Managers and Leaders: Are They Different?” in HBR.

1978

Alfred Chandler’s The Visible Hand: The Managerial Revolution in American Business (1977), which traces the rise of corporate management, wins a Pulitzer Prize.

1980

Michael Porter publishes Competitive Strategy, the book that launches his career as the father of modern strategy.

1985

Thomas McCraw’s Prophets of Regulation (1984), which profiles four Americans from different eras who sought to define and implement regulation, wins a Pulitzer Prize.

1987

C. Roland Christensen’s book Teaching and the Case Method solidifies his reputation as the world’s foremost authority on the case method.

1993

HBS launches the Social Enterprise Initiative to apply innovative business practices to drive high-impact social change.

1994

Building on his earlier work, Michael Jensen advances “agency theory,” the underpinning for compensating executives with stock and stock options.

1996

Robert S. Kaplan (with David Norton, DBA 1973) publishes The Balanced Scorecard, an influential book on strategic performance management and control.

1997

Robert Merton and Myron Scholes win the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for a new method to determine the value of derivatives.

1997

Clayton Christensen’s book The Innovator’s Dilemma articulates the theory of disruptive innovation.

2009

For the first time, annual sales of HBS cases to outside institutions surpass 5 million units, a number exceeded every year since. Eighty percent of cases used in business schools worldwide are from HBS.

2011

HBS introduces team-based, experiential learning with the new FIELD course for first-year MBA students.

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