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Alumni Books


Ptaath’s Hammer
by Wim Baren, i.e., Barry Wemple (MBA 1973)
Westminster & York Ltd.
A 17,000-year-old city is discovered, predating all other known civilizations. A nightmarish blight threatens to spread over the world and brings with it a clash among the immortals themselves. From it, an Earth-shattering cataclysm changes the world forever, foretold by a prophecy from the beginning of time.

 

Dante in China
by John Barr (MBA 1972)
Red Hen Press
In John Barr’s poems, the ancient masters encounter the modern world. Dante on a beach in China beholds the Inferno: “Flaring well gas night and day, / towers rise as if to say / Pollution can be beautiful.” Bach’s final fugue informs all of nature. Villon is admonished by an aging courtesan. Aristotle finds “Demagogues are the insects of politics. / Like water beetles they stay afloat / on surface tension, they taxi on iridescence.” And his afterlife: “When three-headed Cerberus greeted him / Socrates replied: ‘I won’t need / an attack dog, thank you. I married one.’”

 

Mergers and Acquisitions: Integration and Transformation Management as the Gateway to Success
by Stephan Bergamin (AMP 177, 2009) and Markus Braun
Springer
The authors argue that meticulous integration management is the key to success in M&A transactions, half of which are unsuccessful because this key factor is neglected. This practical manual helps managers optimize and streamline their growth strategy using persistent integration and transformation management. The authors provide first-hand accounts of M&A transactions that they led or were involved in, assessing each from an insider perspective and outlining the key success factors and pitfalls. The book concludes with practical checklists that include the most relevant topics for each individual step toward successful integration.

 

Climate of Hope: How Cities, Businesses, and Citizens Can Save the Planet
by Michael Bloomberg (MBA 1966) and Carl Pope
St. Martin’s Press
Mayor Michael Bloomberg and the former head of the Sierra Club have written a manifesto on how the benefits of taking action on climate change are concrete, immediate, and immense. They explore climate change solutions that will make the world healthier and more prosperous, aiming to begin a new type of conversation on the issue that will spur bolder action by cities, businesses, and citizens―and even, some day, by Washington.

 

With Gratitude: Barker Steel and the People Who Made It Work
by Robert B. Brack (OPM 2, 1977)
ArchwayPublishing
When Robert Brack returned to Barker Steel Co. (the business started by his grandfather in 1920) several years after college, the firm had one location and was barely profitable with less than $1 million in sales and 28 employees. But by 2007, Barker Steel was one of the largest independent rebar fabricators in North America with 12 locations throughout the Northeast, generating in some years more than $200 million in sales and employing more than 500 people. Brack tells how this success was achieved.

 

Heroes Wanted: Why the World Needs You to Live Your Heart Out
by Rodney D. Bullard (AMP 187, 2014)
Harvest House Publishers
With all the hardships and unmet needs in the world, it’s difficult to believe one person can make a difference. Bullard, the executive director of the Chick-fil-A Foundation, lists some simple but powerful ways people can affect others and create a legacy of service. His stories aim to help people demonstrate life-changing compassion, understand courage, make brave choices every day, and share authentic stories to provide hope for the weary.

 

Take Off Your Shoes: One Man’s Journey from the Boardroom to Bali and Back
by Ben Feder (MBA 1991)
Radius Book Group
A hard-charging CEO of a large enterprise, Feder discovers that he is losing the very things that sustained him over his years of business success. Unsettled by this insight and determined to rebuild family relationships and rejuvenate his sense of purpose, he risks his career on a life-altering physical and emotional journey. Together with his wife and children, Feder sets off for an exotic island on a self-prescribed sabbatical year. That experience transforms them all.

 

Reverse Innovation in Health Care: How to Make Value-Based Delivery Work
by Vijay Govindarajan (DBA 1978) and Ravi Ramamurti (DBA 1982)
HBR Press
Though still a pipe dream in the US, value-based competition (value as measured by patient outcomes per dollar spent) is already a reality in India. Facing a giant population of poor, underserved people and a severe shortage of skills and capacity, some resourceful private enterprises have found a way to deliver high-quality health care, at ultra-low prices, to all patients who need it. This book shows how the innovations developed by these Indian exemplars are already being practiced by some far-sighted US providers, reversing the typical flow of innovation in the world. Reverse innovation has worked in other industries. We need it now in health care.

 

Not Fade Away: Staying Happy When You’re Over 64
by Alan Heeks (MBA 1976)
CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
This book offers guidance to baby-boomers in three main sections. “Finding Your Gifts” helps you appreciate the good things in your life, how to add to them, and make the best of your resources. “Digging the Challenges” contains guidance and resources for dealing with difficulties (such as failing health, fears of growing older, and grieving lost loved ones) and shares positive ways to meet your financial needs. And “Fresh Maps,” complete with advice from a range of role models, provides insights for changing unhelpful patterns and for becoming a “wise elder” and shares useful hints, forecasts, and opportunities for the decade ahead.

 

Navigating India $18 Trillion Opportunity
by Bharat Joshi (OPM 47, 2015)
Rupa Publications
This book is an account of the possibilities that define India amidst magnificent paradoxes. It provides a guide through firsthand accounts and insights from some of India’s most respected names in business, public governance, diplomacy, and the intelligentsia. It explains the frequent and vital intersections between government and business, culture and modernity, and demographics and democracy.

 

Global Business
by Mahesh Joshi (AMP 185, 2013) and J.R. Klein
Oxford University Press
In the wake of the Brexit vote and the election of Donald Trump, globalization is increasingly under the microscope. The view that the reversal of globalization and a return to protectionism and isolation will cure the world’s ills is touted by many. With insights and observations from academics, practitioners, and practical thinkers from around the world, this book demystifies the economic, social, and cultural effects of globalism and globalization and presents a balanced explanation of what is happening and how it affects everyone.

 

The Story of a Modestly Successful Harvard Business School Graduate, As Told in the Case Study Method
by Fred Kahn (MBA 1963)
CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
In this memoir, Kahn uses the case-study method to examine the most pivotal moments in his decades-long career in business. In plain prose, he describes each situation, the actions he took, the results achieved, and the specific lessons he learned. He provides a helpful, realistic picture of what it means to achieve a rewarding and happy career without reaching the very pinnacle of one’s profession.

 

Architects’ Gravesites: A Serendipitous Guide
by Henry H. Kuehn (MBA 1969)
MIT Press
An illustrated guide to more than 200 gravesites of famous architects from Aalto Alvar to Frank Lloyd Wright. All working architects leave behind a string of monuments to themselves in the form of buildings they have designed. But most architects’ graves are not monumental but rather modest, and many architects did not design their final resting places.

 

Light, Bright, Damn Near White: Stories and Reflections of a Multi-Racial Black Man’s Battles with Racism in America
by Richard Lawrence (PMD 30, 1975)
Onearth Publishing
Integration and black power collide and force a black man who has walked comfortably in the black and white communities to realize he is not free in either place and needs to work for a level of interracial justice in which all of us can be true to our roots and feel at home anywhere in the world.

 

Reflections, Memories, and Confessions
by John L. Loeb Jr. (MBA 1954)
John L. Loeb

 

CEOs Have to Be a Little Crazy: Shenanigans and Valuable Lessons from Notorious Business Renegades
by Joseph Mancuso (MBA 1965)
CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
Since its founding in Manhattan in 1977, the CEO Clubs has sought to create a nurturing environment for CEOs, dedicated to improving the quality and profitability of their life and enterprise, through shared experiences and personal growth. Today, the CEO Clubs is a worldwide phenomenon with new chapters springing up from New York to Los Angeles to mainland China. In this book, business entrepreneur Mancuso tells the tales of the most remarkable people he has met in the business world who have been involved with the CEO Clubs.

 

From Wall Street to Bay Street: The Origins and Evolution of American and Canadian Finance
by Joe Martin (AMP 91, 1983) and Chris Kobrak
Rotman UTP Publishing
The 2008 financial crisis triggered a worldwide recession. Unlike the American banking system, which experienced massive losses, takeovers, and taxpayer-funded bailouts, Canada’s banking system withstood the crisis relatively well and maintained its liquidity and profitability. The divergence in the two banking systems can be traced to their distinct institutional and political histories. The authors argue that while Canada has preserved a Hamiltonian financial tradition, the United States has favored the populist Jacksonian tradition since the 1830s.

 

Choice Matters: How Healthcare Consumers Make Decisions (and Why Clinicians and Managers Should Care)
by Gordon Moore (AMP 79, 1978), John A. Quelch, and Emily Boudreau
Oxford University Press
The direct-to-consumer business model has transformed how people seek out goods and services from music to mortgages. So what happens now that the revolution has come to health care? While consumers have begun to insist on health care that is as convenient and personalized as nearly every other good or service, most health care provider organizations, physicians, and insurance companies remain unprepared to meet this demand. This book is the health care sector’s guide to understanding and delivering the brand of consumer-centered care that is imperative for today. It aims to help clinicians and managers better understand the differences between health care and other consumer-driven markets, what factors are most important for consumers in seeking care providers, how consumers make decisions about health care, the system-wide effects of increased consumer choice in health care, and the important distinction between patients and consumers.

 

The Risk Underwriters
by Herbert Onye Orji (PMD 57, 1989)
AuthorHouse
The Vietnam War damaged the US’s social psyche, as did widespread drug use and chemical dependency. Vivid pictures of violence in Vietnam on TV plus incessant riots in major US cities began to blur the differences between crime, punishment, and socialized violence. In this fictional milieu, James Payne, a blue-blood and a rising corporate attorney, was charged with murdering his lover, also a rising advertising executive in Manhattan. The dramatic trial that followed this incident played out for several years, mirroring the loss of sensibility to crime, violence, and punishment in the larger society.

 

Omar Nelson Bradley: America’s GI General, 1893-1981
by Steven L. Ossad (MBA 1976)
University of Missouri
When Omar Nelson Bradley began his military career more than a century ago, the army rode horses into combat and had less than 200,000 men. No one had heard of mustard gas. At the height of his career, Bradley led 1.23 million men as commander of 12 Army Group on the Western Front to bring an end to World War II. Bradley was the youngest and last of nine men to earn five-star rank and the only army officer so honored after World War II. This new biography by Steven Ossad gives an account of Bradley’s formative years, his decorated career, and his postwar life.

 

Sail the World: Everything You Need to Know to Circumnavigate the Globe
by Erick A. Reickert (MBA 1965)
CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
Reickert explains the whole process of what is required to sail around the world in comfort and style: the essential skills, the selection of a boat that is up to the task, the necessary equipment, and the planning required for world cruising. Costs are discussed as well as the type of ownership, taxes, insurance, and governmental requirements. The nitty-gritty of maintenance and provisioning are covered. Weather and heavy weather sailing are presented based on first-hand experience. Cruising risks, including pirates, are laid bare. All of this is supported with examples of the author’s experience.

 

A Member Is Worth a Thousand Visitors: A Proven Method for Making More Money Online
by Rob Ristagno (MBA 2005)
Independently published
Ristagno guides you step-by-step through the five forces of dramatic online revenue growth and shows why it is vital to identify your very best customers and focus relentlessly on their wants and needs.

 

Digital Resilience: Is Your Company Ready for the Next Cyber Threat?
by Ray Rothrock (MBA 1988)
Amacom
Rothrock lays bare tactics used by hackers, vulnerabilities lurking in networks, and strategies not just for surviving attacks but also for thriving even while under assault. This book helps businesses understand the threats they face, assess the resilience of their networks against attacks, identify and address weaknesses, and respond to data theft swiftly and effectively.

 

Fusion Leadership: Unleashing the Movement of Monday Morning Enthusiasts
by Dudley R. Slater (MBA 1985) and Steven T. Taylor
Greenleaf Book Group Press
Seventy percent of US workers hate their jobs and don’t want to show up on Monday morning, and Slater lays some of the blame for this at the doors of leaders: When their selfish actions diminish the effectiveness of their teams, they commit the ultimate failure in leadership. But when leaders learn how to successfully balance the needs of their egos with the collective needs of their organizations, they can see increased profits and a workforce unified around a common goal.

 

The War on Error: A Hospital Field Manual
by W.T. Subalusky (AMP 112, 1993)
WT Subalusky
Hundreds of thousands of people are seriously injured or die every year from avoidable medical errors. This field manual provides practical guidance on how hospital patients and their advocates can avoid those errors by taking up a weapon and bringing the fight to the enemy.

 

48 Peaks: Hiking and Healing in the White Mountains
by Cheryl Suchors (MBA 1977)
She Writes Press
Floundering in her second career, Suchors decided that, despite a fear of heights, her midlife success depended on hiking 48 of the highest White Mountains in New Hampshire. She endured injuries, novice mistakes, the loss of a best friend, and breast cancer while seeking solace and recovery in the wild. Connecting with friends and with nature, she eventually redefined success, discovering a source of spiritual nourishment in spaces powerful enough to absorb her grief and joy in the persistence of love and beauty.

 

Detonate: Why—and How—Corporations Must Blow Up Best Practices (and Bring a Beginner’s Mind) to Survive
by Geoff Tuff (MBA 2000) and Steven Goldbach
Wiley
Tuff explains how organizations built up bad habits, identifies which ones masquerade as “best practices,” and suggests alternatives that can contribute to winning in the marketplace. The book’s core themes challenge how you think about and approach problems, and its case studies illustrate the challenges you face and how to overcome them.

 

Attentive Leadership: Lead with a Healthy Self-Image
by Flooris van der Walt (AMP 173, 2007)
CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
We can be attentive leaders only when we intimately know our own strengths and weaknesses and know how they are expressed in behavior toward others. We can be authentic leaders only when we are able to thoughtfully compensate for our weaknesses and manage them wisely. The main aim of this book is to focus on developing a completely attainable, healthy self-image in leaders who are excited and driven to take up the challenge of developing a more authentic leadership style.

 

Faculty Books


Food Citizenship: Food System Advocates in an Era of Distrust
by Ray A. Goldberg
Oxford University Press
The global food system is the largest segment of the world’s economy and also the largest health system on the planet. Its size and importance to human, environmental, and economic health means that no system is viewed with as much suspicion by so many people around the globe. Changing societal expectations and scientific and medical advances have made the drivers of the food system—the world’s food citizens—realize they must take more responsibility for society’s nutritional needs, economic development, and the health of the environment. Goldberg argues that the traditionally commodity-oriented, bargaining relationship between segments of the food system has become win-win, collaborative, and characterized by public and private partnerships. Those who are responding to society’s needs are succeeding; those who are not are losing out. The food system’s greatest growth area is the developing world, where millions of small-scale producers, workers, and impoverished consumers need help to become part of the commercial food system.

 

Choice Matters: How Healthcare Consumers Make Decisions (and Why Clinicians and Managers Should Care)
by Gordon Moore (AMP 79, 1978), John A. Quelch, and Emily Boudreau
Oxford University Press
The direct-to-consumer business model has transformed how people seek out goods and services from music to mortgages. So what happens now that the revolution has come for health care? While consumers have begun to insist on health care that is as convenient and personalized as nearly every other good or service they purchase, most health care provider organizations, physicians, and insurance companies remain woefully unprepared to meet this demand. This book is the health care sector’s guide to understanding and delivering the brand of consumer-centered care that is imperative for today. It aims to help clinicians and managers better understand the differences between health care and other consumer-driven markets, what factors are most important for consumers in seeking care providers, how consumers make decisions about health care, the system-wide effects of increased consumer choice in health care, and the important distinction between patients and consumers.

 

Markets, Morals, Politics: Jealousy of Trade and the History of Political Thought
edited by Béla Kapossy,‎ Isaac Nakhimovsky,‎ Sophus Reinert,‎ and Richard Whatmore
Harvard University Press
This collection of essays assesses the influence, ideas, and methods of István Hont, a leader of the Cambridge school of political thought, who argued that to better understand the development of liberalism, one must look not only to the works of great thinkers but also to their reception and use amid revolution and interstate competition. Among the works discussed here is Hont’s 2005 book, Jealousy of Trade, which explores the birth of economic nationalism and other social effects of expanding 18th-century markets.

 

American Fair Trade: Proprietary Capitalism, Corporatism, and the “New Competition,” 1890–1940
by Laura Phillips Sawyer
Cambridge University Press
This book explores the contested political and legal meanings of the term “fair trade” from the late 19th century through the New Deal era. This history of American capitalism argues that business associations partnered with regulators to create codes of fair competition that reshaped both public and private regulatory power. Rather than viewing the history of American capitalism as the unassailable ascent of large-scale corporations and free competition, Sawyer argues that trade associations of independent proprietors lobbied and litigated to reshape competition policy to their benefit. At the turn of the 20th century, this widespread fair trade movement borrowed from progressive law and economics, demonstrating a persistent concern with market fairness—not only fair prices for consumers but also fair competition among businesses. Proponents of fair trade collaborated with regulators to create codes of fair competition and influenced the administrative state’s public-private approach to market regulation. New Deal partnerships in planning borrowed from those efforts to manage competitive markets, yet ultimately discredited the fair trade model by mandating economy-wide trade rules that sharply reduced competition. Sawyer analyses how these efforts to reconcile the American tradition of a well-regulated society with the legacy of Gilded Age laissez-faire capitalism produced the modern American regulatory state.

 
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