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The Progress Principle

Teresa M. Amabile, Edsel Bryant Ford Professor of Business Administration, Director of Research
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What really makes people happy, motivated, productive, and creative at work? Professor Amabile’s new research, based on analyzing nearly 12,000 daily diaries of team members working on collaborative creative projects, reveals some surprising answers. Inner work life—a person’s day-by-day emotions, perceptions, and motivation—has a profound effect on the person’s creative productivity. And of all the good things that can boost inner work life, the single most important is simply making progress on meaningful work, even if that progress is a small step forward. This is the Progress Principle. Its implication? Sustained creative productivity and employee well-being depend less on elaborate incentive systems or performance-management processes than on techniques for facilitating the small wins that constitute daily work progress.

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Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


The Low Risk Anomaly: Implications for Investment, Asset Allocation, and Corporate Finance

Malcolm P. Baker (PhDBE 2000), Robert G. Kirby Professor of Business Administration
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One of the basic principles of finance is that, in competitive and efficient markets, investors earn higher average returns only by taking greater risks. Asset classes follow this pattern: Stocks have returned more than bonds, and bonds have returned more than cash. But, within the stock market, the pattern is reversed. Low-risk stocks, whether measured by volatility or market beta, have outperformed high-risk stocks, on average, in 80 years of US stock market history and in 30 years of international data. Drawing on his research, Professor Baker will describe the behavioral and institutional explanations for this anomaly and discuss the potential implications for investment, asset allocation, and corporate finance.

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Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


Business Ethics Made Simple

Joseph L. Badaracco, John Shad Professor of Business Ethics
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Managers often face complicated ethical issues and trade-offs. They can’t study these issues forever and need to take action. This raises the question of how they can find what is simple and fundamental in the midst of complexity. In other words, are there ways to cut to the core of complex ethical issues in organizations and find the right way to resolve them, successfully, responsibly, and expeditiously? This session, based on a book Professor Badaracco is now writing, will address this issue directly. Using several brief case studies, Professor Badaracco will encourage participants to describe what they have found to be the most valuable and practical way of thinking through hard ethical issues. He will also present the approach he has developed and describe the practical guidance it suggests for managers.


Effective Change Agents: The Power of Networks

Julie Battilana, Associate Professor of Business Administration
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Instituting change has always been the bane of leaders. Numerous studies show that employees tend to instinctively oppose such initiatives because they disrupt established positions, power structures, and ways of getting things done. At the same time, much of their resistance is not overt or even conscious. So change agents must infer people's attitudes and then work to bring them on side. But some leaders do succeed—often spectacularly—at transforming their organizations. What makes one manager triumph in a situation when the vast majority would fail? Existing models of change management provide only partial answers as to why the results are so variable. So we set out to investigate what successful change agents do differently, focusing on organizations in which size, complexity, history, and tradition make it exceptionally difficult to push change through. Our findings were striking. They show that the network of relationships that change agents establish with colleagues in their organization is essential to their ability to push change through. The most effective change agents relied on three network "secrets" to get their initiatives adopted, and in so doing, they offer lessons for anyone trying to effect change, whether you are the boss or a middle manager.

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Spring 2014 Presentation Slides


The Power of Noticing

Max H. Bazerman, Jesse Isidor Straus Professor of Business Administration
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The Power of Noticing is deeply rooted in the rapidly evolving field of behavioral decision research, now popularized through such acclaimed books as Nudge and Thinking, Fast and Slow; Predictably Irrational. In Thinking, Fast and Slow, Kahneman argues that people jump to conclusions based on limited information. He introduces the acronym WYSIATI to describe decision making that is based on the faulty assumption that “what you see is all there is.” The Power of Noticing addresses this limitation in human thinking, identifies what information we do not see or notice, and describes how we can use this knowledge to seek the information that will be most useful for making great decisions. While I agree with Kahneman’s description of how humans act, leaders need to realize that “what you see is not all there is” (WYSINATI) and to identify when and how to obtain the missing information. The talk focuses on the journey needed for leaders to become first class noticers.

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Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


Why Business Must Step Up to Save Capitalism

Joseph L. Bower (MBA 1961), Baker Foundation Professor
and Lynn S. Paine, John G. McLean Professor of Business Administration
Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Development
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Initial research for the book Capitalism at Risk, by HBS professors Joe Bower, Dutch Leonard, and Lynn Paine, showed that business leaders around the world shared two main concerns: first, that a number of powerful forces playing out within and across various regions could disrupt the progress of global capitalism; and, second, that the governments of most countries, as well as the world’s major international institutions, were too weak economically and politically to do much about it. Since then, researchers have been working with leading companies to understand how they are attacking some of these problems on their own. In this session, Professors Bower and Paine will summarize their findings and discuss examples of what companies are doing to devise profitable, sustainable strategies that mitigate some of those threats. Participants will use the last part of the session to explore what they think ought to be done once people stop saying, “The government should….”

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Spring 2014 Presentation Slides


Aligning Strategy and Sales

Frank V. Cespedes, MBA Class of 1973 Senior Lecturer of Business Administration
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For most companies, the most expensive part of implementation is aligning sales and other go-to-market efforts with their strategies and goals. Yet, research indicates a big gap between strategy and field execution in sales. On average, companies deliver only about 50% of the financial performance that their strategies and sales forecasts promise. That’s a lot of wasted money and managerial effort. This session will focus on tools to help close that gap and improve selling and strategy in your organization. Cespedes will outline what research for his new book, Aligning Strategy and Sales: The Choices, Systems, and Behaviors That Drive Effective Selling (Harvard Business Review Press), can say about improving performance in this area. He will also leave attendees with diagnostics that they can use when they return to their organizations.

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Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


Capitalist Dilemma and How Will You Measure Your Life

Clayton M. Christensen (MBA 1979), Kim B. Clark Professor of Business Administration
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Professor Christensen loves to tackle questions. Whether they are about how to live a happy, meaningful, purpose-filled life to what are patterns in the economic recovery cycle. Using a set of theories as lenses to the world, he routinely asks his students to share what they see through these lenses. He continues the conversation and shares insights from these conversations here. He’ll talk about his current research looking at the economy along with how this same research applies to family relationships, aligning resources with priorities, and how he has chosen to measure his life.

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Spring 2014 Presentation Slides
Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


Design Thinking and Innovative Problem Solving

Srikant M. Datar, Arthur Lowes Dickinson Professor of Accounting
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In their book, Rethinking the MBA: Business Education at a Crossroads (Harvard Business Review Press), Professors Srikant Datar and David Garvin and researcher Patrick Cullen identified creative and innovative thinking as an essential skill for managers operating in a world of rapidly evolving product and business models and ever-increasing complexity. In this talk, Professor Datar will describe how managers can develop design thinking and innovative problem-solving skills. These skills include the ability to gain deep insights about users (the core of design thinking), to define and reframe problems, and to overcome fixedness in thinking to generate, develop, and implement novel and effective solutions. Professor Datar will also discuss how managers can build innovative organizations, identify innovative individuals, form innovative teams, and nurture innovative cultures.

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Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


Google, Facebook and the End of Anonymity

John A. Deighton, Harold M. Brierley Professor of Business Administration
and Benjamin G. Edelman, Associate Professor of Business Administration

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The automobile changed the physical world. The Internet is changing the mental world. First came Google, which put a dent in human ignorance, and then Facebook, which did the same for loneliness. Do these virtues come at a cost? They alter the line between private life and life in the marketplace; they change the balance of information between buyers and sellers, they change what it means to be alone. This session will report on research that finds that US firms spend $156 billion to buy marketing services grounded in microdata about individual consumers. Are marketers getting value for this spending? Are consumers?

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Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


Getting Where You Want to Go: Overcoming the Cognitive Distortions That Get in the Way

Thomas J. DeLong, Philip J. Stomberg Professor of Management Practice
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While the assumption is that people are all accomplishing all of their career and life goals, there are some very talented individuals who may come up short and unknowingly sabotage their own efforts. This session will explore the cognitive distortions that play out in people's thinking processes and behaviors that prevent them from realizing their goals. Avoiding important conversations, allowing fears to dominate thinking, allowing negative experiences to have undue influence on future behavior are examples of behaviors that inhibit the ability to think clearly and act in ways that serve oneself. The intent of the session is not only to learn about these patterns of thinking and feeling but how to confront and manage them.

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Spring 2014 Presentation Slides


The Slow-Motion LBO of America

Mihir A. Desai, Mizuho Financial Group Professor of Finance, Senior Associate Dean for Planning and University Affairs
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Corporations are capitalizing on record profits and attractive borrowing opportunities to repurchase their shares in record amounts, effectively recapitalizing themselves slowly—much like a leveraged buyout does instantly. Tax reform that allows offshore cash to come home will only accelerate this trend. Is this a rational adjustment to a new reality or a massive, missed opportunity? How should boards, investors, and regulators understand repurchase activity, and what new rules and metrics might we use to assess these activities?

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Spring 2014 Presentation Slides


Case Discussion – Terror at the Taj Bombay: Customer-Centric Leadership

Rohit Deshpandé, Sebastian S. Kresge Professor of Marketing
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“The Ordinary Heroes of the Taj”—Join a case discussion about the bravery and resourcefulness shown by the rank-and-file employees of the Taj Mahal Palace and Tower luxury hotel during the terrorist attacks that took place in Mumbai, India, on Nov. 26, 2008. Excerpts from the “Terror at the Taj” multimedia case will be shown during the session, featuring video interviews with hotel staff and executives combined with security footage of the attack, which create a documentary-like account of the events that took place. The case also covers the hotel’s history, its approach to training, and the “guest is God” philosophy inherent in Indian culture. Why did the Taj employees stay at their posts, jeopardizing their safety in order to save hotel guests? And is this level of loyalty and dedication something that can be replicated and scaled elsewhere?

Note: The Terror at the Taj Bombay case discussion will be based on a video case shown live in the classroom; no pre-reading or viewing is required.

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View Case


Building a Performance-Driven Social Sector: Implications for Managers and Board Members of Nonprofits and Social Enterprises

Alnoor Ebrahim, Associate Professor of Business Administration
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How can social sector organizations such as social enterprises, nonprofits, and foundations better measure their performance in order to drive social change? Under what conditions should they measure short-term results that they can control, as compared to long-term results that depend on many other partners in an ecosystem? Associate Professor Ebrahim will discuss his research on innovative organizations that are attempting to crack this problem, and he will lead a conversation about the future of this field.


Fixing the Internet

Benjamin G. Edelman, Associate Professor of Business Administration
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The Internet is what we make it. Is it what we want it to be? We'll look at several areas where improvements are both feasible and desirable. We'll explore why online privacy has been so thorny – companies not complying with their own privacy commitments, but also consumers' mixed views on whether they actually care about privacy. In online search and advertising, we'll see market dominance that leaves surprisingly few choices for both consumers and advertisers. And we'll look at some of the web's most vile material – online "reviews" that defame competitors; and services that solicit illicit photographs, hate, and worse. One might hope that entrepreneurs and competition would help fix these problems, or that the legal system would step in. We'll look at what has worked and what is left to do.

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Spring 2014 Presentation Slides


Product Management 101

Thomas R. Eisenmann (MBA 1983), Howard H. Stevenson Professor of Business Administration
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Great product managers (PMs) can have a tremendous impact on a technology company's performance. PMs define a product, then lead a cross-functional team responsible for its development, launch, and ongoing improvement. The elective course Product Management 101 aims to prepare MBAs for this demanding and crucial role by using a learning-by-doing approach. Over the course of a year, PM101 students conduct research on user needs for a software application, specify functional requirements, recruit and supervise programmers, and then manage the application's launch. Professor Eisenmann will describe the challenges and rewards of designing and delivering a course that eschews the traditional HBS case method and instead relies solely on its complement, the field method. He also will discuss how PM101 fits into broader efforts underway at HBS to better prepare students for entrepreneurial careers.

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Spring 2014 Presentation Slides


Lean Experimentation

Thomas R. Eisenmann (MBA 1983), Howard H. Stevenson Professor of Business Administration
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Entrepreneurs who follow the “lean start-up” approach strive to avoid wasting time and money. As quickly as possible, they launch a “minimum viable product” (MVP) with the smallest feature set necessary to rigorously test hypotheses about their opportunity, based on feedback from early adopters. They rapidly iterate this MVP based on a succession of tests, and pivot to a new product design, market segment, or business model when hypotheses are disproved. Professor Eisenmann describes how lean start-up principles are being taught in the required first-year MBA course, The Entrepreneurial Manager, and applied in the new FIELD course, which requires all first-year students to launch a new venture. He will also discuss the Rock Accelerator Program, a competition through which HBS this year made $5,000 grants to 20 MBA start-ups based in part on the quality of MVP tests they proposed.

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Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


Strategic Marketing Management: Betting on Blockbusters and Superstars

Anita Elberse, Lincoln Filene Professor of Business Administration
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Big bets on blockbusters and superstars are commonplace in the business of entertainment, but such strategies increasingly pervade other consumer-goods sectors, too, including fashion, electronics, luxury goods, beverages, and apparel. That’s why managers in a wide range of industries can benefit from understanding successful strategies in show business. Drawing on a decade worth of research on the creative industries, Professor Elberse will describe which strategies give leaders in film, television, music, publishing, and sports an edge over their rivals. Along the way, she will reveal why the search for the next blockbuster often is so costly, why superstars can earn unimaginable sums, how digital technologies are transforming the entertainment landscape—and what the key lessons are for managers across a wide range of other industries.


Financial Crisis and Money-Market Funds: Was there a linkage and is it now gone?

Kenneth A. Froot, Professor of Business Administration, Retired
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Money market funds, which have been seen as stable, high quality, and low risk—and which grew tremendously in use over the past two decades—played a central role in the 2008 financial crisis. And even then people were lucky—they could have done far more damage. Regulators have recently revisited this problem and made several changes to the way these funds work. Are these changes sufficient? Can money market funds still serve as the Achilles heel among investible assets for major financial instability?

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Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


U.S. Competitiveness: Building America's Middle Skills

Joseph B. Fuller (MBA 1981), Senior Lecturer of Business Administration
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The jobs market in the United States offers a number of paradoxes. Employers complain about the unavailability of skilled workers, while millions remain unemployed, underemployed, or have withdrawn from the workforce. Middle-skills jobs have attracted particular attention. By some estimates these jobs account for about half of the labor force. Historically, they represented a reliable path to the middle class. But many of those jobs have been automated out of existence, relocated offshore, or have seen their wages stagnate. In this session, Professor Fuller will discuss research on the role of businesses in closing middle-skills gaps. He will explain why the traditional definition of “middle skills” is inadequate and present a unique view of jobs data. He will argue that by adopting a broad-based focus on US competitiveness, employers, educators, and policymakers can address the skills gap and eroding standards of living.

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Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


Sidetracked: Why Our Decisions Get Derailed, and How We Can Stick to the Plan

Francesca Gino, Professor of Business Administration
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Professor Gino has long studied the factors at play when judgment and decision making collide with the results of people’s choices in real life. She will explore how inconsistent decisions play out in a wide range of circumstances—from people’s roles as consumers and employees (what they buy, how they manage others) to the choices they make more broadly as human beings (whom they date, how they deal with friendships). She will discuss when a mismatch is most likely to occur between what people want and what they end up doing. Participants will learn what people can do to correct for the subtle influences that derail decisions, to better understand the nuances of their decisions and how they get derailed, so they have more control over keeping them on track.


Is Japan Headed toward the Same Fate as Greece?

Robin Greenwood, George Gund Professor of Finance and Banking
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Professor Greenwood will discuss the case “Hayman Capital Management,” which concerns an investor’s investment decision on Japan. Japan has the world’s highest debt burden, whether expressed as a percentage of GDP or government revenue. Guided by recent global events, Professor Greenwood will lead a discussion about whether Japan will have the same fate as Greece or whether a smooth landing is in store, as well as the broader role that investors have played in recent global economic fluctuations.


Transforming America's Schools: How Business Leaders Can Help

Allen Grossman, MBA Class of 1957 Professor of Management Practice, Retired; and Jan Rivkin, Bruce V. Rauner Professor of Business Administration
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The time has come for America's business leaders to reconsider how they work with educators to support public schools. Trends are converging to create fresh opportunities, greater need, and a unique moment for business involvement. In this session, Allen Grossman and Jan Rivkin will discuss current research—conducted with the Gates Foundation and BCG as part of HBS's project on US competitiveness—on business's role in education. The work highlights how business can move from "checkbook philanthropy" toward lasting impact on student outcomes. They will also describe specific ways that alumni can get involved in local public schools.

Related link: PK-12 publications

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Spring 2014 Presentation Slides (Grossman & Rivkin)
Fall 2014 Presentation Slides (Grossman)


Digital Transformation

Sunil Gupta, Edward W. Carter Professor of Business Administration
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Digital technology is disrupting almost every industry. Netflix wiped away Blockbuster, and Best Buy is becoming a showroom for Amazon. Telecom firms are afraid to become dumb pipes even as mobile usage increases exponentially. Even large and successful offline players, like Wal-Mart, are struggling to build a digital business. In this session, participants will discuss a framework for digital transformation of large firms.


Value Claimers and Value Creators? What is the difference and why does it matter

Brian J. Hall, Albert H. Gordon Professor of Business Administration
Unit Head, Negotiation, Organizations & Markets

Less Info

This talk will explore the difference between value claiming and value creating. Professor Hall argues that understanding this distinction delivers great insight into the central issue in business. What is the purpose of business and how do we get there? What is the purpose of business leaders? What does value claiming look like in practice? What does value creating look like in practice? Why is it so hard to get to value creation and what can be done about it? What is the evidence that being a value claimer or value creator leads to a better life? To a better society? What can everyone do, in terribly practical ways, to ensure that the businesses they help lead create a better world for themselves and for the world?

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Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


The Allure of the Long Tail: The History of Venture Capital in America

Felda Hardymon, MBA Class of 1975 Professor of Management Practice
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The venture-capital industry represents one of the most significant mechanisms for growth, innovation, and wealth accumulation in history, and, like jazz, baseball, and blue jeans, it appears to be an American invention. Professor Hardymon started the HBS History of Venture Capital project to study this industry, which is closely identified with HBS. By some estimates, about 25% of professional VCs are HBS graduates. This session draws on the course Venture Capital in Historical Perspective and will examine early hybrid models for entrepreneurial financing, pioneers such as Georges Doriot and Arthur Rock, and the pivotal firms that created a pathway to modern venture finance. It will also document the rise of hotspots like Silicon Valley. The objective will be to look at the industry's past as a guide to the present and the future.


Sustainable Capitalism: An Oxymoron?

Rebecca M. Henderson (MBA 1985), John and Natty McArthur University Professor
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The world’s population has doubled in Professor Henderson’s lifetime and tripled in her father’s. These growing numbers are placing increasing pressure on many of the earth’s resources, but particularly on land and water, while accelerating economic growth is simultaneously accelerating emissions of greenhouse gases, so that there is now a serious risk of destabilizing the earth’s climate. Business is often identified as the source of many of these problems, but business is also the source of the freedom, prosperity, and opportunity that is so central to meeting humanity’s needs. In this talk Professor Henderson will explore both the risks and the tremendous opportunities inherent in harnessing the power of private enterprise to build a more sustainable world, and explore how people can hold the tension between the demands of the bottom line and their desire to make a difference in the world.

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Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


Health Care, What's Next?

Regina E. Herzlinger (DBA 1971), Nancy R. McPherson Professor of Business Administration
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Professor Herzlinger will discuss the impact of the health care reform legislation on the US health care system and economy, worldwide developments, and HBS curriculum for innovating in health care.


The Art and Practice of Leading Innovation

Linda Hill, Wallace Brett Donham Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

What does it take to build an organization that can innovate in today’s global economy? What kind of leadership is needed? How can one select and develop the kind of leadership talent needed? These are questions Professor Hill has been researching along with, among others, the former senior vice president of technology for Pixar. She will share examples from her new book of leaders who have learned how to cultivate “collective genius” and provide a framework for creating organizations in which people are willing and able to innovate.


Digital Innovation And Transformation: What Are Nest And WhatsApp Really Worth And What Does It Mean For The Rest Of Us?

Marco Iansiti, David Sarnoff Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

The ubiquity of digital connectivity is creating new giants and transforming old industries. This session will focus on the changes driven by digital innovation, and its implications for business value creation and capture. We will discuss emerging business and operating models, and their foundations in technology and economics. The content will draw from Digital Innovation and Transformation, a new Elective Curriculum course introduced this last spring.


Cultures of Confidence, Dynamics of Decline, and How to Turn Around Nearly Anything

Rosabeth M. Kanter, Ernest L. Arbuckle Professor of Business Administration
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This presentation provides a guide to leadership action in a networked world of volatility and change. It identifies the surprisingly universal behaviors associated with the momentum of growth or decline across industries or countries. It covers topics related to effective turnarounds of businesses, sports teams, schools, health centers, communities, and even family relationships, including:

  • how values-based leadership can reverse decline and build cultures of confidence by stressing purpose and principles over short-term gains;
  • the connection between collaboration and innovation: how the community supports the entrepreneur;
  • how small investments and small wins can have catalytic chain reactions that can revive stagnating regions or relationships;
  • leadership actions that can turn ordinary organizations of all sizes into “SuperCorps” that can perform seeming miracles;
  • inclusion and empowerment as keys to resilience.

What You're Really Meant to Do

Robert Steven Kaplan (MBA 1983), Martin Marshall Professor of Management Practice in Business Administration, Senior Associate Dean, External Relations, and Faculty Chair, The Harvard Business School Campaign
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How do you reach your unique potential? How can you manage yourself in order to meet this lifelong challenge? This talk will discuss a roadmap for creating one's own definition of success—and then achieving it.

Related Resources:
Spring 2014 Presentation Slides


How to Reconcile Mission and Margin in Healthcare: Deliver Better Outcomes at Lower Cost

Robert S. (Bob) Kaplan, Marvin Bower Professor of Leadership Development, EmeritusR
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Recent attempts at health care reform have focused on the “demand” side, attempting to improve patients’ access to the system. Professor Bob Kaplan will discuss his collaboration with Michael Porter on the “supply” side, helping health care providers deliver better value: improving their patient outcomes while incurring lower total costs. He will describe the HBS-supported work using time-driven, activity-based costing for accurate and transparent costing at the individual patient level. The approach promises to transform the economics of the health care industry by facilitating major improvements in process efficiencies, resource deployment and utilization, and costs without compromising patient outcomes. It will also accelerate the replacement of fee-for-service payment models with bundled payment reimbursements that reward providers for delivering the best outcomes at the lowest cost, not those that perform multiple and expensive procedures.

Related Resources:
Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


American Public Education Reform: What's Next

John Jong-Hyun Kim, Senior Lecturer of Business Administration
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More than 15,000 public school districts operate in the United States, spending about $600 billion annually. There are more students enrolled in public schools today—nearly 50 million—than at any other point in the history of the United States. The 100 largest districts serve about 22 percent of total students and 35 percent of the nation’s minority students. While pockets of high performance exist in these large systems, excellence at scale remains an elusive goal in education. The costs of inconsistent quality of schooling—particularly for minority students—are tremendous, amounting to nearly a trillion dollars a year in GDP. There are many reform efforts underway, ranging from federal and state governments’ taking a more proactive role in school reform to education technology start-ups seeking ways to integrate technology to improve learning. This session will explore some of those efforts.

Related Resources:
Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


Can China Lead?

William C. Kirby, Spangler Family Professor of Business Administration; T. M. Chang Professor of China Studies, Harvard University
Less Info

Europe led the world in the 19th century. The United States was the dominant power of the 20th century. What are the prospects for the 21st century being the "Chinese Century?" The question of whether China can sustain its remarkable emergence of the past 35 years is the subject of Professor Kirby's new book, Can China Lead? Reaching the Limits of Power and Growth, coauthored with Regina M. Abrami and F. Warren McFarlan (Harvard Business Review Press, Feb. 2014). Looking at business, education, and politics, Professor Kirby will talk in this session about the challenges and opportunities for China and for the United States.


Digital Innovation and Transformation: Lessons from Startups and Industrial Giants on How to Win in a World of Digital Convergence

Karim R. Lakhani, Lumry Family Associate Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

The ubiquity of digital connectivity is creating new giants and transforming old industries. This session will focus on the changes driven by digital innovation, and its implications for business value creation and capture. We will discuss emerging business and operating models, and their foundations in technology and economics. The content will draw from Digital Innovation and Transformation, a new Elective Curriculum course introduced this last spring.

Related Resources:
Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


Future of Retailing: Will Your Store Survive?

Rajiv Lal, Stanley Roth, Sr. Professor of Retailing
Less Info

“Category killers,” those highly focused retailers that specialize in a category of goods, including Barnes & Noble, Best Buy, and Staples, were once the bane of mass-market retailers’ existence. Their wide assortment, aggressive pricing, large stores, extensive store network, and deep expertise in the categories they served proved a massive competitive advantage. Today, however, these same distinguishing characteristics may prove to be the undoing of the big-box stores. Retailing, generally, is at a tipping point, with category killers being the first significant casualties of the (r)evolution that is occurring. Retail store asset productivity has been in decline since the start of the recession in 2007, and this trend will accelerate over the coming years. For mass-market retailers that can see this trend coming and react quickly enough, this upheaval is survivable. But those slow to register the tsunami wave on the horizon stand to be swept away. What can retailers do to survive or thrive?


Private Equity at a Crossroads: What's Next?

Josh Lerner (PMD 62), Jacob H. Schiff Professor of Investment Banking
Less Info

Both the buyout and venture capital industries face unprecedented challenges today. After an orgy of investments in the mid-2000s, private equity funds suffered a hangover of epic proportions. In recent quarters, however, the portfolios of the private equity funds have recovered in a manner that has surprised even the most optimistic observers. Meanwhile, venture capital, after a prolonged drought, has experienced new life—and even the repeat of bubble-like behavior, according to some observers. But all is not rosy: many of the investors on which these funds have traditionally depended, such as endowments and pensions, have increasingly looked to bypass funds and to instead pursue direct investments into private firms. This talk will explore this unsettled and often mysterious territory and offer some surprising predictions about the future of these sectors.

Related Resources:
Spring 2014 Presentation Slides
Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


How Companies Hide Bad News and Manipulate Their Stock Prices

Christopher Malloy, Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

This session will explore how companies hide bad news from the stock market by manipulating the information they release to the market. Professor Malloy will highlight one particular, seemingly innocuous, channel: the way firms set up their public conference calls. He will show that firms manipulate and choreograph these calls in order to control the information flow to the market. Firms that "cast" their conference calls by disproportionately calling on optimistic analysts tend to under-perform in the future. These firms that call on more favorable analysts also barely exceed or meet earnings forecasts on the calls that they cast, and in the quarter directly following their casting tend to issue equity and have significantly more insider selling. All of these behaviors are consistent with firms actively trying to manipulate their stock prices. Session participants will also discuss the policy implications of these findings, as well as what actions executives can take to avoid being perceived as market manipulators.

Related Resources:
Spring 2014 Presentation Slides


Case Discussion—Leadership Lessons from Chobani: Growing a Live and Active Culture

Joshua Margolis, James Dinan and Elizabeth Miller Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

Join a case discussion about the surprising rise of Greek-yogurt maker Chobani, as participants try to unravel the puzzle of how its founder and CEO, Hamdi Ulukaya, reinvigorated the dairy aisle and transformed the yogurt category. Through a series of video excerpts from the multimedia case about Chobani and its leader, participants will uncover the leadership lessons that apply beyond start-ups and yogurt, and consider how he should address the challenges that lie ahead.

Note: The Chobani case discussion will be based on a video case shown live in the classroom; no pre-reading or viewing is required.

Related Resources:
Full multimedia case


Defining Greatness: Lessons Learned from Business Legends

Anthony Mayo, Thomas S. Murphy Senior Lecturer of Business Administration
Less Info

Would Walt Disney be a success in today's hypermedia environment? Would Henry Ford's uncompromising focus on productivity through mass production resonate with today's automobile industry? Could Jack Welch lead today with the approach that gave him and his company such prominence just a few years ago? Business leaders do not operate in a vacuum. In any era, executives lead within environments that are constantly reconfigured by contextual factors. Which of the 20th century's great leaders were most adept at exploiting the opportunities of their times? This session will explore lessons from historically great leaders to better understand what can be applied to our current understanding of leadership, and how one can build his or her personal capabilities to be both contextually and emotionally intelligent—two key skills that are important components of the FIELD course at HBS.

Related Resources:
Spring 2014 Presentation Slides


Can China Lead?

F. Warren McFarlan (MBA 1961), Baker Foundation Professor Albert H. Gordon Professor of Business Administration, Emeritus
Less Info

The question of whether China can sustain its remarkable emergence of the past 35 years is the subject of Professor F. Warren McFarlan’s HBR Press book, Can China Lead? Reaching the Limits of Power and Growth, coauthored with Regina M. Abrami and William C. Kirby, published in January 2014. Looking at the subject through the lenses of a historian, a political economist, and a general management scholar, respectively, the book’s answer is almost surely “No.” For multiple reasons, China will be a leader, but not the leader. Professor McFarlan will talk about both the challenges and opportunities for those seeking to do business with and within China over the next several decades.

Related Resources:
Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


Threats to the Global Economy

David A. Moss, John G. McLean Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

Is globalization in trouble, and if so, what are the biggest challenges it faces? In this lecture, Professor Moss will survey major threats to the global economy, particularly emanating from Europe, the United States, and China. He will pay particular attention to the potential economic and financial consequences of mounting political problems in each of these centers of power. Using history as a guide, he will explore what could go wrong and, where possible, how these risks might be mitigated. There is no case or other reading associated with this lecture, and no preparation by participants in advance of the session is required. After the lecture, there should be time for Q&A.


When Leaders Make a Difference

Gautam Mukunda, Assistant Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

Assistant Professor Mukunda will describe how his research, detailed in his book, Indispensable: When Leaders Really Matter, shows when and how individual leaders in fields as diverse as politics, business, and science can save or destroy the organizations they lead.

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Spring 2014 Presentation Slides
Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


Leveraging Service Excellence to Enhance Customer Profitability

Das Narayandas, James J. Hill Professor of Business Administration
Senior Associate Dean for HBS Publishing; Senior Associate Dean, Chair, Executive Education

Less Info

Firms are increasingly looking toward service excellence to augment their core offerings and create sustainable differentiation that, in turn, increases customer satisfaction and profitability. Participants will discuss specific initiatives and actions that firms can implement to leverage their employees to deliver superior service and ensure and enhance the success of their customer retention strategies.


Happy Money: How Charitable Giving Improves Your Own Happiness – and Your Organization's Bottom Line

Michael I. Norton, Associate Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

Can money make a perrson happy? Professor Norton’s research suggests that it can—if you give it away. Encouraging people to spend on others makes those people happier than spending on themselves. In addition, the positive impact of behaving charitably can improve organizational health and performance. “Prosocial incentives” dramatically improve employee satisfaction and job performance. Professor Norton will discuss this new research and how the findings should change the way organizations think about incentivizing employees and how people should think about spending their own money.

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Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


It Doesn't Have to Be This Way: A New Model for Thriving in Our Hyperconnected and Hyperefficient World

Leslie A. Perlow, Konosuke Matsushita Professor of Leadership
Less Info

What happens when tremendous changes are imposed in the workplace—ubiquitous technology, 24/7 globalization, and hyperefficiency—but fail to change the way people work? People have become less efficient, unable to plan or prioritize work; less effective, with speed substituting for strategy and innovation; more isolated, as technology (paradoxically) reduces real human interaction; overwhelmed, unable to plan or collaborate; and more harried, as the dividing line between work and home disappears. But it doesn’t have to be this way. Professor Perlow’s research shows that workplaces must go beyond simply accommodating these recent developments; they must change.


Investing in Real Assets

André Perold, George Gund Professor of Finance and Banking, Emeritus
Less Info

This session will focus on investing in "real assets" such as timberland, farmland, water, shipping, oil and gas, metals, and power generation. Despite their manifest differences, real assets have similarities among their investment characteristics, including being subject to common supply-and-demand dynamics. This session will examine a spectrum of real asset opportunities in the current environment and highlight some of the key drivers of today's global economy.


Value Based Health Care Delivery in the United States

Michael E. Porter (MBA 1971), Bishop William Lawrence University Professor
Less Info

What drives value in health care? How do care teams evaluate their work and improve over time? How are best-care practices discovered and disseminated—across physicians, facilities, and regions of the world? Too often, we focus on what we do—discrete interventions and procedures—rather than the results we achieve. That’s why The Boston Consulting Group, Professor Porter, and the Karolinska Institutet came together in 2012 to found ICHOM—the International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement. ICHOM’s goal is to make health outcomes the primary focus of providers and the ultimate measure of successful care. ICHOM brings together physician leaders and patients to develop Standard Sets of outcomes for particular medical conditions.In November 2013 ICHOM released its first four Standard Sets of outcomes. ICHOM aims to have published Standard Sets for more than 50 of the world’s most burdensome conditions by 2017.

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Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


The Market for Smaller Firms

Richard S. Ruback, Willard Prescott Smith Professor of Corporate Finance
and Royce G. Yudkoff, Senior Lecturer of Business Administration

Less Info

Smaller firms sell for substantially lower multiples than larger firms in similar businesses. These smaller firms—with transaction values below $10 million—typically sell for four times EBITDA, multiples that are half to a third as large as those for comparable larger companies. These low multiples seem to provide enormous opportunities for potential buyers. The magic of small-firm investing is surely these low multiples. This talk will offer some thoughts about the market for smaller firms and the dynamics that result in the low multiples for smaller firms.

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Spring 2014 Presentation Slides
Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


Twenty-First Century Energy

Forest Reinhardt, John D. Black Professor
Less Info

The world of energy is in turmoil: technological innovations on the supply side, exploding demand from developing nations, shifts in the geopolitical landscape, and pressures on the natural environment seem to render much of what people thought they knew about the economics and politics of energy obsolete. But is this really true? How can people make sense of these seismic shifts? What will the energy industries of the future look like? Who will benefit from the changes, and who will suffer? Drawing on the fundamental ideas of strategy and leadership that alumni remember from their time at HBS, participants will attempt some answers to these complicated questions.

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Spring 2014 Presentation Slides


Barclays & The LIBOR Scandal - Exploring Failure, Leadership And The Relationship Between Wall Street And The Government

Clayton S. Rose, Professor of Management Practice; Chair, MBA Community Standards
Less Info

Barclays PLC was the first of the world's largest banks to settle with authorities and acknowledged that the firm had manipulated LIBOR—a benchmark interest rate that was fundamental to the operation of international financial markets and was the basis for trillions of dollars of financial transactions. Much of which occurred on the cusp of the global financial crisis brought into question both the credibility of LIBOR and the public's trust in the financial system. It cost Barclays' chairman and its controversial CEO Bob Diamond their positions and called into question the actions of the Bank of England, the UK's central bank. Participants will discuss the culpability of traders, senior management, and regulators in the manipulation and ensuing scandal, ask whether it is acceptable to cheat to "save the financial system," and more generally explore how a business leader should act in a corrupt system.


The Basis for Optimism

William Sahlman (MBA 1975), Dimitri V. D'Arbeloff - MBA Class of 1955 Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

This talk focuses on the challenges confronting the United States and other countries and the entrepreneurial actors who are hard at work finding solutions. If K‒12 education is failing in the United States, entrepreneurs are designing new systems that are less costly and more effective. If climate change threatens life as we know it, entrepreneurs are searching for scalable, clean, low-cost alternatives to hydrocarbons. That’s the basic duality participants will discuss.

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Spring 2014 Presentation Slides


The General Manager's Job in a New World of Business: Key Challenges and Dilemmas

Leonard A. Schlesinger, Baker Foundation Professor
Less Info

It has been over 30 years since John Kotter conducted his groundbreaking research reported in The General Managers. The world has changed in many ways—his population was largely white males in US business environments, and the competitive environments for their firms were relatively benign compared to today. Most significantly, there was little facilitating technology embedded in their day-to-day work. What do general managers do today? Who are they, where do they come from, and what is the nature of their contribution in a world loaded with both "big data" and "unknown unknowns"? In this session, participants will explore timeless lessons from decades of prior research and discuss the challenges of redefining the role for a new era of global commerce and technology-mediated disruption, with its associated questions for management education and development.

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Spring 2014 Presentation Slides
Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


Learning from Harvard's "Great Negotiators"

James K. Sebenius (PhDBE 1980), Gordon Donaldson Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

What can we learn from closely studying great negotiators at work? Since 2001, the Program on Negotiation—an interuniversity consortium involving Harvard, MIT, and Tufts—has annually bestowed the “Great Negotiator Award” on men and women such as George Mitchell, Bruce Wasserstein, Richard Holbrooke, Charlene Barshefsky, and James Baker. By systematically probing the strategies and tactics of this distinguished group, one can uncover broader lessons about negotiation. The Great Negotiator in 2014 was Tommy Koh of Singapore, who chaired the Law of the Sea Negotiations and the UN’s Rio Earth Summit, mediated an ugly dispute between the Russian Federation and the Baltics, and served as Singapore’s chief negotiator for the U.S.-Singapore Free Trade Agreement. During this session, Professor Sebenius will sketch the Great Negotiators program and, as an example, probe Koh’s unusual approach to the Free Trade negotiations for broader insight into complex dealmaking.

Related Resources:
Fall 2014 Presentation Slides - 1 of 2
Fall 2014 Presentation Slides - 2 of 2


Alzheimer's Disease Progress and Prospects

Kevin W. Sharer, Senior Lecturer of Business Administration
Less Info

Senior Lecturer Sharer, former Chairman and CEO of the biotechnology company Amgen, will lead a discussion focused on the prevalence, disease mechanisms from a biological perspective, current therapies, and state of research in the field of Alzheimer’s disease. He will be joined by a leading researcher currently working in the field to help answer questions and provide perspective. The presentation and discussion will be structured to both inform the layperson and bring the more knowledgeable attendee up-to-date information at the scientific level typically found in the New York Times Science section. After the background materials presentation and discussion, the group will engage in a case study‒like dialogue about what actions a leading biopharmaceutical company should take to best assure that an effective and safe Alzheimer’s medicine reaches the market as soon as is feasible.

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Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


Producing Prosperity: Why America Needs Manufacturing Renaissance

Willy C. Shih, Robert and Jane Cizik Professor of Management Practice in Business Administration
Less Info

In this session, Professor Shih, drawing from his recent book, Producing Prosperity (coauthored with Gary Pisano), will discuss the competitive position of the United States in the global economy, and why a strong manufacturing sector is critical to America’s capacity for innovation and long-term economic health. He will discuss how both management and public policies are critical to restoring the health of America’s eroding “industrial commons.”

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Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


Seven Strategy Questions: A Simple Approach for Better Execution

Robert Simons, Charles M. Williams Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

Executing strategy requires tough choices. Unfortunately, many managers avoid choosing in the mistaken belief that they can have it all. Instead of focusing on one primary customer, they try to serve many different types of customers. Instead of instilling values that prioritize the interests of shareholders, customers, and employees, they develop lists of aspirational attributes. Instead of focusing on what could cause their strategy to fail, they build complex scorecards with an overload of measures. The result: disappointing performance and declining market position. To guard against these risks, Professor Simons will review the seven strategy questions that all executives (and directors) should ask to ensure that business leaders are making the tough choices that ensure successful strategy execution and winning in highly competitive, global markets.

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Spring 2014 Presentation Slides
Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


What it Takes to BE(come) a World-Class Leader: Authentic Leader(ship) Development

Scott A. Snook (MBA 1987), MBA Class of 1958 Senior Lecturer of Business Administration
Less Info

This session will be an interactive discussion that draws on Snook’s 30-plus years of experience as a leader, teacher, and researcher. Using a series of short video vignettes and personal stories, Snook will argue that success is as much about who you are as it is about what you know and what you can do. Drawing from the emerging fields of positive psychology and authentic leader development, Snook will demonstrate the potential of this novel approach by introducing participants to a wide range of interesting characters, including The Happy Greeter, General Norman Schwarzkopf, Simon Cowell, and Michael Jordan. Based on his experience teaching the highly popular HBS course Authentic Leadership Development, Snook will lead participants through a reflective exercise designed to help them experience what it feels like to actually BE(come) more authentic.

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Spring 2014 Presentation Slides
Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


Wealth: A Nice Problem to Have

Howard Stevenson (MBA 1965), Sarofim-Rock Professor of Business Administration, Emeritus
Less Info

HBS boasts many wealthy graduates, many self-made. Many people think that money solves all problems—and it certainly can help—but it creates other challenges. At the request of his children, Professor Stevenson has been trying to capture what he has learned about wealth in a “book” for the family. In this seminar, he will share his latest thinking about wealth, which he defines as the accumulation of a pool of assets that give choice; and investing, where his experiences as the first president and a cofounder of Baupost, a $26 billion investment fund, and with his family’s investment partnership affords him some special insights. He also will counter common wisdom on the particularly thorny issue of wealth and families, and offer some suggestions for raising wealthy children.

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Spring 2014 Presentation Slides
Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


The Economics of Attention

Thales S. Teixeira, Assistant Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

Attention is a necessary ingredient for effective advertising. The market for consumer attention (or “eyeballs”) has become so competitive that attention can be regarded as a currency. The rising cost of this ingredient in the marketplace is causing marketers to waste money on costly attention sources or reduce their investment in promoting their brands. Instead, they should be thinking about how to “buy” cheaper attention and how to use it more effectively. Research in the emerging field of the economics of attention shows how this can be achieved.

Related Resources:
Working Paper: The Rising Cost of Consumer Attention: Why You Should Care, and What You Can Do About It
Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


Designing and Building a (Great) Customer Experience

Stefan Thomke, William Barclay Harding Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

Why do some customer experiences have that magical “wow” factor, making them destined for success, while others get few, if any, enthusiastic customer responses? How would one design a great customer experience? These are some of the questions in this new and innovative classroom exercise. Participants should bring creativity, imagination, and a willingness to use the left and right parts of the brain.
NOTE: The session will require participants to build Lego models; it is based on the Lego Serious Play methodology. Participants should arrive on time (space is limited to classroom seats).

Preparation questions:

  1. Think of a terrible customer experience. Why was the experience so poor?
  2. Now think of a great customer experience. What made it so memorable for you? Compare it with your terrible experience. What are the differences?

Leading Innovation and Change: The Challenge of Innovation Streams and Open Innovation on Incumbent Firms

Michael Tushman, Paul R. Lawrence MBA Class of 1942 Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

This interactive session will explore the challenges of building organizations, both public and private, that can excel at today's innovation as well as create tomorrow's innovation. It will emphasize, with a range of video examples, the challenges of open innovation on incumbent firms and focus on the characteristics of senior leaders that build effective ambidextrous firms.


Wealth Management in the XXIst Century

Luis M. Viceira, George E. Bates Professor
Less Info

With more than $15 trillion in assets under management, the US retail wealth management industry is the largest of its kind in the world, and one of the most highly competitive and innovative. Recent demographic, cultural, and industry trends are transforming the wealth management business. This talk will explore these trends, how the traditional wealth management business is responding to them, and how new business models are emerging and disrupting traditional firms.


Deficits and Debt in the USA

Richard H.K. Vietor, Paul Whiton Cherington Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

This presentation, after a brief background on US economic strategies in the Reagan, Bush, Clinton, and Bush eras, will focus on America’s twin deficits in the 2000s. It will examine the causes of America’s fiscal deficits, its current account deficit, and the recent congressional compromise on the debt ceiling. It will conclude by forecasting deficits in the next 10 years and by considering an alternative to congressional action.

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Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


The Founder's Dilemmas: Anticipating and Avoiding the Pitfalls That Can Sink a Startup

Noam Wasserman, Associate Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

Worried about being blindsided on your entrepreneurial journey? Since 2000, Associate Professor Wasserman has focused on founders' early "people decisions" that tend to get them into trouble down the road. The potential consequences include the splintering of the founding team, the harming of company growth, and being fired as CEO. At this session, he will discuss his award-winning HBS course, Founders' Dilemmas, and his best-selling book, The Founder's Dilemmas: Anticipating and Avoiding the Pitfalls That Can Sink a Startup. The book and the course integrate his research results, quantitative data on 10,000 founders, and case studies to help founders, investors, and others involved in startups understand where their early decisions are likely to lead.

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Spring 2014 Presentation Slides


The Roots of the Debate over Tax Reform

Matthew Weinzierl, Associate Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

Fundamental tax reform is overdue in the United States. While the outlines of a compromise seem clear, agreement remains elusive. Associate Professor Weinzierl studies the roots of this stalemate, and in this interactive discussion participants will explore some of the underlying tensions driving the current debate. They may even come to appreciate the other side of the debate a bit better.

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Spring 2014 Presentation Slides


From Good to Great to Gone: Winners and Losers in Consumer Electronics Retailing

John R. Wells (MBA 1979), Professor of Management Practice
Less Info

In today’s world, only the smartest survive. The competitive landscape is littered with the graves of well-known firms whose revenues, profits, and stock prices rose for decades until they suddenly imploded. In fast-changing business environments, intelligent companies constantly adapt their strategies and innovate to remain at the top. But many successful firms are not so vigilant. They succumb to inertia, they hesitate, or they stick blindly to their old strategies until they find themselves in crisis. And once the crisis hits, it is often difficult to recover; they have gone beyond the point of no return. The ability to adapt to change is a measure of intelligence—so why do firms demonstrate such low “strategic IQ”? What causes inertia and why is it so deadly? How can leaders help their firms to act more intelligently?

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Spring 2014 Presentation Slides
Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


The Art of Negotiation: How to Improvise Agreement in a Chaotic World

Michael Wheeler, MBA Class of 1952 Professor of Management Practice, Retired
Less Info

Professor Wheeler presents a fresh and dynamic approach to negotiation, one that challenges the static assumptions of win-win and hard-bargaining models. The simple truth is that negotiation can’t be scripted. People can’t dictate what other parties will say or do any more than they would let others dominate them. Success thus requires strategic agility and the capacity to be nimble from moment to moment. Professor Wheeler draws practical lessons from masters of improvisation in other fields, including jazz, comedy, competitive sports, and even warfare. He is the author of The Art of Negotiation (Simon & Schuster).

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Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


The Digital Revolution: How Technology Is Changing the World

David Yoffie, Max and Doris Starr Professor of International Business Administration
Less Info

Cloud computing, social networking, the explosion of smartphones and tablets, and the drive to connect all digital products together are having a profound impact on management, strategies, and the way people live their lives. This session will explore the underlying drivers of technological change, the critical trends in technology today, and the impact this revolution will have on tomorrow.

Related Resources:
Spring 2014 Presentation Slides


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Campus Tour

James E. Aisner, Director of Media and Public Relations
Less Info

Want to see what happened to the WAC chute? Interested in learning what an i-lab is? Ever wonder why the chapel is round? Join 30-year HBS veteran Jim Aisner, the School’s director of media and public relations, on a campus tour filled with anecdotes and memories.


 

Why Is There Any Life in the Universe at All?

Charles Roger Alcock, Professor of Astronomy; Director, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
Less Info

The early universe did not offer promising opportunities for life to develop. At the most elementary level, we think life needs a warm place and a mixture of chemical elements, neither of which was present as the universe expanded after the Big Bang. The universe cooled as it expanded and was for a few million years at hospitable temperatures, after which it became very cold and profoundly dark. We are now investigating the developments that led to the first stars, the chemical elements, and the circumstances that would permit life to develop here on Earth and elsewhere.


Nice Start! Now What?

Mark Chussil (MBA 1979), Founder and CEO of Advanced Competitive Strategies, Inc.
Less Info

Life is not a checklist, bucket list, or shopping list. So what is your life?
In this highly interactive session, participants will ask, and answer, thought-provoking questions about themselves and their lives. They will

  • Find out who they are at the core;
  • Learn how to recognize when they’ve stopped thinking too soon;
  • Consider whether it’s bad to lose $80 million;
  • Explore how many days they have felt truly alive;
  • Get to know their one-way trips, two life-changing words, and fighting tigers. (No, not Princeton.)

And much more. Participants should come prepared to think, share, and smile.


The Next Harvard: Planning for Transformation

Angela Quinn Crispi (MBA 1990), Associate Dean for Administration and Senior Executive Officer
and Andrew O'Brien, Chief of Operations
Less Info

Harvard and HBS are undertaking one of the largest real estate developments in the City of Boston. This interactive discussion will showcase these evolving plans. Learn how Harvard’s vision for Allston will create a campus of the next century, putting HBS, long recognized as one of the most renowned campuses in higher education, at the center of the University’s master plan. Hear how the HBS campus has evolved over the past five years and which innovations are planned for the next five as it designs the campus of the future.

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Spring 2014 Presentation Slides


 

Innovating at Frontiers of Art and Science

David A. Edwards, Professor of the Practice of Idea Translation, Harvard University Faculty of Arts and Science
Less Info

The famous divide between the arts and sciences has emerged as one of the most exciting contemporary settings for learning and discovery. In this talk, Professor Edwards will describe a new art and science public engagement paradigm that guides learning and discovery toward disruptive innovation. This paradigm, explored in recent years at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University and spun out in the form of ArtScience Labs, forms the basis of a cultural incubator (Le Laboratoire) next to the Louvre in Paris and a new Cambridge cultural incubator to open in 2014 (The Lab Cambridge) next to MIT. Via these centers, ArtScience Labs engages leading international artists, designers, and scientists in public experimentation that assumes the form of cultural exhibitions and innovative food experiences. Several of these have led to unusual consumer product platform technologies and Cambridge-area startups, backed by Polaris Partners and Flagship Ventures. These include edible packaging, or WikiCells, by which foods and beverages are packaged in fruit-like skins and shells; breathable food, or the Aero, the basis of AeroShot Energy that presently sells in around 20,000 stores in the US, and the new Ophone, by which Onotes and Otracks can be generated and exchanged with the facility of e-mail and text messaging.

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Spring 2014 Presentation Slides


How Biology Has Changed the Global Economy, Is Transforming the World's Largest Businesses, and Will Change Even the Human Species

Juan Enriquez (MBA 1986), Managing Director, Excel Venture Management
Less Info

We have had 26 species of humans and are now beginning to birth the 27th. As we modify viruses and bacteria to compute, vaccinate, retrovirally treat, or crowd out harmful pathogens, we begin to take direct and deliberate control over the evolution of various species. We are doing the same with bacteria, plants, animals, and ourselves. This changes man from a humanoid that is aware of and modifies its environment into a species that directly and deliberately guides evolution. And this is changing everything, including our life span, religions, ethics, the power of various countries, and, not least, businesses and industries.

Related Resources:
Spring 2014 Presentation Slides


The Future of Ford Motor Company

Conversation with Mark Fields (MBA 1989), President and Chief Executive Officer,
Ford Motor Company
and Robert Steven Kaplan (MBA 1983), Professor of Management Practice; Senior Associate Dean, External Relations; and Faculty Chair, The Harvard Business School Campaign.


Harvard Innovation Lab Presentation and Tour

Gordon Jones, Managing Director, Harvard Innovation Lab
Joseph B. Lassiter, Senator John Heinz Professor of Management Practice in
  Environmental Management
Jodi Goldstein, Director, Harvard Innovation Lab
Less Info

Opened in November 2011, the Harvard Innovation Lab, or i-lab, is designed to foster team-based and entrepreneurial activities across Harvard and to deepen interactions among students, faculty, entrepreneurs, and the Boston community. The lab provides public areas and meeting rooms designed to foster project work as well as business- development resources for companies, nonprofits, entrepreneurs, and other individuals in the Allston-Brighton neighborhood and Boston area. This is a central place where students, practitioners, and local businesses can work together, share knowledge, and collaborate on ideas. Join us for a presentation, video, and tour of the Harvard Innovation Lab.


 

The Coming Transformation of US K‒12 Education

Thomas Kane, Professor of Education and Economics, GSE; Member of Faculty, Harvard Kennedy School
Less Info

More than three decades after the Nation At Risk report and after several waves of largely symbolic reform efforts, the transformation of the US education system has finally begun. Tom Kane, Faculty Director of the Center for Education Policy Research and former Deputy Director of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's K‒12 reform efforts, will describe four ideas that will raise student outcomes over the next decade: better feedback for teachers on the job, Common Core standards, personalized learning, and big data. The United States can close the gap with top-performing countries within ten years. Come and hear how.


HBX Business Education Reimagined for the Digital Age

Jana Kierstead, Executive Director, HBX
and V.G. Narayanan, Thomas D. Casserly, Jr. Professor of Business Administration
Unit Head, Accounting and Management

Less Info

Jana Kierstead and V.G. Narayanan present HBX, a digital learning initiative powered by Harvard Business School. They will cover the historical context of HBX in relation to other online education platforms and Dean Nohria’s vision of HBS as a leader in business school innovation. Professor Narayanan will provide a deep-dive into the Credential of Readiness (CORe) program, a primer on the fundamentals of business. Jana Kierstead will introduce HBX Live!, a one-of-a-kind digital classroom that will enable learners world-wide to connect in real time. Platform demonstrations will illustrate the technology and teaching elements that make HBX unique.

HBX: http://www.hbx.hbs.edu/


Saving and Investing For a Secure Future

Stuart E. Lucas (MBA 1989), Chairman and CIO, Wealth Strategist Partners
Less Info

For many people, long-term wealth planning suffers because they are wrapped up in the day-to-day details of careers and family. In a world of slowing growth, low interest rates, higher taxes, and greater longevity, the challenge of managing wealth is even tougher. Lucas will confront this challenge by drawing from his insider experience managing his own family’s good fortune, his 30-plus years as a successful investment professional, and his interactions with hundreds of other wealthy families from around the world. He will share well-tested, practical frameworks to help participants navigate the financial services industry and manage their wealth strategically, comprehensively, and even simply. By compounding profits, controlling cost, developing effective governance, and transferring values to future generations, people can meet their financial objectives while maintaining their focus on career and family. Each participant will receive a copy of Wealth: Grow It and Protect It, Lucas’s highly acclaimed and practical book about managing long-term wealth.


 

Educating the Innovators of the 21st Century: Can We Teach Innovation?

Eric Mazur, Balkanski Professor of Physics and Applied Physics; Area Dean for Applied Physics
Less Info

Innovation requires whole-brain thinking — left-brain thinking for creativity and imagination, and right-brain thinking for planning and execution. The current approach to education in science and technology focuses on the transfer of information, developing mostly right-brain thinking by stressing copying and reproducing existing ideas rather than generating new ones. Professor Mazur will show how shifting the focus in lectures from delivering information to teamwork and creative thinking greatly improves the learning that takes place in the classroom and promotes independent thinking.

Related Resources:
Spring 2014 Presentation Slides


Discover The 7 Best Time Management Practices of Highly Productive Executives & Get Better Results with Your Time

Kathryn McKinnon (MBA 1989), HBS Executive Coach, Time Management Expert, Speaker, Trainer, Author of "Triple Your Time Today!"
Less Info

No one can run on all cylinders 24/7, yet that’s exactly what’s happening today, when people are constantly connected to their electronic devices and are expected to be available to every demand for their time. This session is designed to help people who are always looking for more time. They are so busy and stressed that they never have enough time to focus. They procrastinate on important projects because they have too many priorities. They find themselves reacting to their day instead of planning ahead. They can’t get important work done because they spend their time in meetings, catching up on email, and responding to urgent requests. In this executive coaching session, Kathryn McKinnon will share seven best practices to help participants address these issues and achieve better results with their time.

Participants should come with a time management or productivity issue and start to solve it.

Related Resources:
Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


 

The Promise of Stem Cell Science

Douglas Melton, Thomas Dudley Cabot Professor of the Natural Sciences, Xander University Professor, Faculty of Arts and Sciences Harvard University
Less Info

Advances in stem cell science have moved closer to the development of new medicines and cellular transplantations for degenerative diseases. This science of how people’s bodies are made and maintained by stem cells is also opening a door to regeneration and a life of healthy aging.

Related Resources:
Fall 2014 Presentation Slides


Endowment Management in a Changing World

Jane Mendillo, President and CEO, Harvard Management Company
Less Info

Harvard Management Company (HMC) is dedicated to the management of Harvard University's endowment and related assets. With about one-third of the University's annual budget dependent on endowment income, HMC's mission is to produce long-term investment results that support the goals of the University. Over the last 20 years, HMC's average annual return of 12% is substantially better than that of a US 60/40 stock/bond portfolio and the 9.1% annual return for the endowment's Policy Portfolio benchmark. HMC employs a unique hybrid model of investment management, using both internal portfolio managers as well as a select set of high-quality external investment management firms across a range of asset classes and geographies. This hybrid approach gives Harvard several advantages, ranging from significant cost savings associated with its internal management platform to greater degrees of market insight and increased nimbleness in taking advantage of investment opportunities.


Disrupt The Workforce: Unlock The power Of Independent Talent- What It Means For You

Jill Perrin (MBA 1985) and Laura Klein (MBA 1996)
Less Info

Last October, Clay Christensen asserted that the consulting industry stood at the brink of disruption. This interactive work session will focus on one of the forces poised to disrupt it: the high-growth marketplace for independent consulting. We'll cover "hot areas" and share how both companies and consultants can take advantage of this new paradigm in human capital. Through discussion with presenters Jill Perrin (MBA 1985) and Laura Klein (MBA 1996) as well as other attendees, we'll cover topics such as:

  • How independent consultants can launch, scale and nurture career paths that are meaningful and impactful—on their own terms
  • How companies can leverage independent talent as a competitive advantage
  • Structuring projects for success from both client and consultant perspectives
  • Lessons gleaned from those serving at the front lines of this emerging marketplace

 

Finding Huck Finn: Reclaiming Childhood from a River of Electronic Screens

Michael Ogden Rich, MD, MPH, Mediatrician and Director, Center on Media and Child Health, Children's Hospital Boston, and Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School
Less Info

Today's children are growing up in a world transformed by interactive media. How can parents and others who care for children tell if these media are helping or hurting them? How can they make sure that the media environment supports children's health and development? As Mediatrician and director of the Center on Media and Child Health at Boston Children's Hospital, Dr. Rich offers research-based, balanced answers to these and other urgent questions about parenting in the digital age.

Related Resources:
Spring 2014 Presentation Slides


Tour of the Western Avenue Foundation, Future Home of the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Daniel Rico, Project Manager, Harvard Planning and Project Management
Less Info

Meet in the lobby of Batten Hall
Join Harvard University Project Manager, Daniel Rico, on a tour of the Western Avenue Foundation, the site of a new facility that will house a portion of the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Initial planning and programming for the new facility is underway and design is expected to begin soon. The foundation, which covers approximately five acres and extends 45' underground, has been designed for flexibility, and can support a wide range of activities and structures that may be constructed on it in the future. Join Mr. Rico to hear about plans to date, to see models of the Allston plan, and to tour this massive foundation. The tour will last approximately 30-45 minutes.


Living an Extraordinary Life

Stever Robbins (MBA 1991), Executive Coach, Stever Robbins, Inc.
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How would life change if people committed to living only a life that they defined as extraordinary? In this presentation, Robbins will identify myths about jobs and careers and practical strategies that work. The material is drawn from Robbins’s own experiment in extraordinary living but is also grounded in multidisciplinary science and research. He will cover topics from entrepreneurship to decision making, learning, and career planning. Participants will walk away with new insight into how they have shaped their lives and strategies for making changes in pursuit of whatever life they define as extraordinary.
They will learn that:

  • Planning a life doesn’t work very well, but there are other things they can do instead;
  • Fear isn’t what holds people back; habit is;
  • Intelligence, willpower, and drive aren’t the keys to having the life one wants; systems and people are.

 

The Future of Energy in a Changing World

Daniel P. Schrag, Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology, Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering, and Director of the Harvard University Center for the Environment
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Concerns about climate change and about conventional air pollution have motivated a worldwide effort to eliminate the use of fossil fuels. How much progress has been made? Remarkable improvements in the cost of renewable energy have occurred over the past decade, but the largest innovation has been in hydrocarbon extraction, specifically through improvements in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. How is the world energy system likely to develop over the coming decades, in the face of serious environmental challenges? A variety of strategies will be discussed for meeting the world's energy needs with the smallest possible impact on the atmosphere.

Related Resources:
Spring 2014 Presentation Slides


The Agility Advantage: How to Win Market Leadership in a Fast-Changing World

Amanda Setili (MBA 1990), Managing Partner, Setili & Associates, and Author of "The Agility Advantage, How to Identify and Act On Opportunities in a Fast-Changing World"
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In the past, companies could pick a strategy and stick with it, maintaining a competitive edge for years. But today, companies surge ahead, fall behind, or even disappear from view in mere months. The future will present more opportunities but also narrower windows through which to capture them. Amanda Setili has worked with and studied dozens of companies to identify the mindsets, habits, and capabilities that enable strategic agility—the ability to spot and jump on new opportunities being created by market change.

Participants will learn how the most agile companies:

  • Identify those elements of their business where agility is crucial;
  • Learn from their most fastest-growing and most forward-thinking customers;
  • Anticipate the changes that may affect their business and recognize emerging business opportunities;
  • Capitalize on market changes to establish new competitive advantage;
  • Inspire employees around a compelling purpose and grant them the autonomy and resources to continuously experiment, adapt, and adjust course.

Startup Showcase

Batten Hall/Harvard iLab, Second and Third Floors
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As part of our spring reunion programming, we are running this exciting program featuring alumni from the 5th, 10th, 15th, and 20th Reunions. The goal of the program is to showcase and support reunion attendees in the process of building new business ventures while creating entrepreneurial spirit within the HBS alumni community. For this event, a startup will be considered a company or partnership designed to create a repeatable and scalable business model. These companies, generally newly created within five years, are in a phase of development and research for markets. Each startup will have the opportunity to give a 60-second pitch on basic concept, funding to date, potential application/market, and what they need. Following the pitches, there will be time allocated for networking and follow-up discussion. All alumni and guests are invited to attend as audience members. Registration for startup pitches is closed.


Sustainable Peak Performance: Helping High Achievers Be At The Top Of Their Game Sustainably

Cindy Tran (MBA 2004)
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High Achievers, by definition, are motivated by achievement. They think big, play to win, and refuse to give up. The strong drive for success may also carry with it various blind spots with serious consequences. For High Achievers to be at the top of their game sustainably, it is important to understand: a) What would it take to be at one's best? b) How to sustain this 'peak performance'?

Cindy Tran, ACC (MBA 2004) - Certified Executive Coach & Leadership Development Consultant – has conducted a series of research works to find holistic and systematic answers to these key questions. The end goal is to identify the most important development opportunities for High Achievers to be at their best in a sustainable way.

You will walk away from the session with:

  • Fresh new perspectives on achievement and what it means for you
  • Heightened awareness of key blind spots that often derail High Achievers
  • Practical frameworks and tools to help you be at your best sustainably

Panel – Aging Parents: Navigating the Journey Successfully (Spring 2014)

Moderator: Janet Simpson Benvenuti (MBA 1985), Founder and CEO, Circle of Life Partners
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  • Kim Cantor Burns (MBA 2009), Georgia-Pacific
  • Carin Knoop (MBA 1994), Harvard Business School
  • Stephen Spano, Esq., Spano & Dawicki, Elder Law
  • Lisa Wright (MBA 1999), Wright Consulting Partners

Are you responsible for aging parents and other loved ones while juggling the demands of your professional career? If so, join a panel of alumni and aging experts to hear about specific strategies and resources for navigating your parents' later years successfully. Learn how to address the legal, financial, medical, and caregiving challenges while enjoying the benefits of multi-generational families. Each participant will receive a copy of Don't Give Up on Me! Supporting Aging Parents Successfully, Janet's highly acclaimed guide through the unpredictable last years of her journey with her own parents. This book has become a must read for adult children who find suddenly, just when life is on overload, that their parents need help.


Panel – Aging Parents: Navigating the Journey Successfully (Fall 2014)

Moderator: Janet Simpson Benvenuti (MBA 1985), Founder and CEO, Circle of Life Partners
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  • Jean-Jacques Illi (MBA 1989)
  • Stephen Spano, Esq., Spano & Dawicki, Elder Law
  • Dr. Heidi Wyle (MBA 1989), Biotech Executive and Author
  • Jeffrey Ziment (MBA 1984), Ziment Financial Advisors

This session is aimed at people who are responsible for aging parents and other loved ones while juggling the demands of their own professional careers. A panel of alumni and aging experts will discuss specific strategies and resources for navigating one’s parents’ later years successfully. Participants will learn how to address legal, financial, medical, and caregiving challenges while enjoying the benefits of multigenerational families. Each participant will receive a copy of Don’t Give Up on Me! Supporting Aging Parents Successfully, Benvenuti’s highly acclaimed guide through the unpredictable last years of her journey with her own parents. This book has become a must-read for adult children who find suddenly, just when life is on overload, that their parents need help.


Panel – Asset Management (Spring 2014)

Moderator: Robert Steven Kaplan (MBA 1983), Martin Marshall Professor of Management Practice in Business Administration, Senior Associate Dean, External Relations, and Faculty Chair, The Harvard Business School Campaign
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  • Edmund A. Hajim (MBA 1964), President, Diker Management, LLC; formerly chairman and CEO, ING Furman Selz Asset Management; formerly chairman and CEO, Lehman Management
  • Carter Brooks (MBA 2004), Managing Director, Blue Ridge Capital
  • Whitney R. Tilson (MBA 1994), Managing Director, Kase Capital
  • Sturgis P. Woodberry (MBA 1994), Managing Director, Iridian Asset Management

Panel – Asset Management (Fall 2014)

Moderator: Luis M. Viceira, George E. Bates Professor
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  • Vikram S. Gandhi (MBA 1989), Founder and CEO, VSG Capital Advisors, Founder, Asha Impact
  • Nami Park (MBA 1989), Managing Director, Strategic Product Management, BlackRock Inc.
  • Sarah Keohane Williamson (MBA 1989), Partner, Director of Alternative Investments, Wellington Management Company, LLP

Panel – Balancing or Blending Your Life – Whatever It Is, Let's Do It

Moderator: Gina LaRoche (MBA 1994), Director, Seven Stones Leadership
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  • Elisabeth Bentel Carpenter (MBA 1994), Chief Operating Officer, Evertrue, Inc.
  • Scott Holley (MBA 2009), Director, Harken Capital
  • Katherine Johnson (MBA 1999), SVP and Chief Marketing Officer, Jones Broadcast Group and Independent Consultant
  • Eric C. Lohrer (MBA 2004), Private Investor, Loreda Holding

Panel – Buying a Company: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

Moderator: Jason Grinstead (MBA 1999), President, Care at Home, Inc.
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  • Pankaj S. Amin (MBA 1999), SC VENTURES
  • Ann M. Bilyew (MBA 1994), CEO, MDeverywhere
  • David S. Chellgren (MBA 2004), Chief Financial Officer, Devcon (TCI) Ltd.
  • John D. Spottiswood (MBA 1994), EVP Business & Corporate Development, Inflection

Panel – Climate Change

Moderator: Betsy Harper (MBA 1984), Energy Project Manager, MA Dept of Housing & Community Development
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  • Brad H. Dockser (MBA 1989), CEO, Green Generation Solutions
  • John Levy (MBA 1979), Chairman, BioLite
  • John McCall MacBain (MBA 1984), Founding Chair, European Climate Foundation, President, McCall MacBain Foundation
  • Roger E. Shamel (MBA 1974), Chief Executive Officer, Consulting Resources Corp

Panel – Entrepreneurial Ventures: What Is It Like Being an Entrepreneur and Should You Be One

Moderator: Chip Hazard (MBA 1994), General Partner, Flybridge Capital Partners
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  • Rahul Anand (MBA 2009), CEO, Founder, Hopscotch.In
  • Thomas Clayton (MBA 2004), CEO, Bubbly
  • Jeffrey R. Glass (MBA 1994), CEO, Skyhook Wireless
  • Maia Haag (MBA 1994), President, I See Me! Personalized Books & Gifts
  • Rick Marini (MBA 1999), Founder & Chief Executive Officer, BranchOut Inc.

Panel – Getting on Boards

Moderator: Melissa Bethell Wong (MBA 1999), Managing Director, Bain Capital
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  • Dan Gertsacov (MBA 2004), CEO, Americas, Lenddo
  • Mauro H. Gimenez (MBA 2004), Managing Director, Russell Reynolds Associates
  • John M. Scott, III (MBA 1994), President and CEO, Belmond (UK) Ltd
  • Harry J. Wilson (MBA 1999), Founder & CEO, MAEVA Group, LLC.

Panel – Helping Your Community

Moderator: Kathleen A. Murray (AMP 112), President, HBS Women's Association of NY; Partner, McMorran Strategists LLC
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  • Mark L. Capaldini (MBA 1979), Immediate Past Chair, Board of Directors, American Red Cross, Northern Minnesota Region
  • Tonye P. Cole (AMP 186), Founding Partner, Sahara Group
  • Howard R. Leibowitz (AMP 106), HL Consulting; former Director of Intergovernmental Relations for the City of Boston
  • Patricia Nettleship (AMP 86), Foundation Director, La Senora Research Institute; served on the Executive Committee of Harvard Business School Alumni Association of California
  • Leighton B. Welch (MBA 1989), President, Welch Capital Partners LLC, Board of The U.S. Soccer Federation Foundation, Co-chair of The U.S. Soccer Federation Foundation NY Leadership Council, former Board member of Lawrence Hospital

Socially responsible is now part of our business lexicon encompassing for-profit and non-profit endeavors as well as more than a thousand B-Corporations in the U.S. Helping the community is no longer a discussion about "either-or". It is about how to help the community "and" be in business. This panel of individuals is weighted towards individuals who have made personal decisions to make a difference by helping their community. The discussion will focus on:

  • In today's global world, what is your community?
  • How to integrate "making a living" with helping others?
  • What are the rewards and risks about deciding to help others?
  • What practical advice to share about how to help your community?
  • How have you been engaged in the community throughout your lifetime?

Join us and add to the conversation.


Panel – Joining & Serving On Boards

Moderator: Howard Brod Brownstein (MBA 1974), The Brownstein Corp.
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  • Secretary Elaine L. Chao (MBA 1979), Chairman, Ruth Mulan Chu Chao Foundation
  • Kenneth A. Goldman (MBA 1974), Chief Financial Officer, Yahoo! Inc.
  • Nancy J. Karch (MBA 1974), Director Emeritus, McKinsey&Co; Board Chair, Kate Spade & Co.
  • Nayla M. Rizk (MBA 1984), retired Spencer Stuart partner, led the firm’s boards search practice on the West Coast. Long term member of several non-profit boards

Panel – Moving from Success to Significance

Moderator: Jennifer Moses (MBA 1989), co-founder, Caliber Schools
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  • Kevin P. Boyle (MBA 1984), Co-Founder of Autism Housing Pathways
  • Bill Roedy (MBA 1979), www.billroedy.com
  • Corrine M. Walijarvi (MBA 1979), Director of Strategic Planning, DePelchin Children's Center
  • Rick Walleigh (MBA 1974), Senior Advisor, TechnoServe

Panel – New Career Path

Moderator: Eunice Zehnder-Lai (MBA 1994), co-CEO, IPM
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  • Raja Ramachandran (MBA 2009), Director of Product Management, Change Healthcare
  • Hem Suri (MBA 2009), Senior Director, Biz Transformation, Mitchell International
  • Brad Sutton (MBA 1999), Senior Partner, The Trium Group
  • Maryam Triebel (MBA 2009), Executive Director Global Retail Strategy - Jo Malone London, The Estee Lauder Companies Inc.
  • Zuhairah Scott Washington (JD/MBA 2005), General Manager, Uber DC

Panel – Powerhouse Investors

  • Arthur Segel, Poorvu Family Professor of Management Practice
  • David Abrams, Abrams Capital Management
  • Jonathon Jacobson (MBA 1987), Highfields Capital Management
  • Seth Klarman (MBA 1982), The Baupost Group
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Professor Segel will lead a discussion about world capital markets and opportunities for investing. Among other topics, the panel will explore changes in the investment business over the last 25 years, the effect of the Federal Reserve's policies on the current economy, the causes of market inefficiencies, and the panelists' perceptions of their own successes.


Panel – Preparing for & Managing Retirement

Moderator: Thomas F. Mann (AMP 102), CFA, MannMaxx Management, LLC
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  • Stephen P. Gosden (MBA 1979), Webmaster, European Commission
  • Margaret Huber, (AMP 108), former Chief of Protocol for Canada, Foreign Affairs & International Trade Department; Fellow in the Harvard University Advanced Leadership Initiative program
  • Steven A. Williams (MBA 1984), Principal, Williams Career Consultants

Panel – Private Equity (Spring 2014)

Moderator: Matthew Rhodes-Kropf, Associate Professor of Business Administration
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  • John P. Connaughton (MBA 1994), Managing Director & Chairman Global Private Equity, Bain Capital, LLC
  • Shashank Singh (MBA 2004), Partner, Apax Partners
  • Glenn A. Youngkin (MBA 1994), Co-President and Co-Chief Operating Officer, The Carlyle Group

Panel – Private Equity (Fall 2014)

Moderator: Robert Steven Kaplan (MBA 1983), Martin Marshall Professor of Management Practice in Business Administration, Senior Associate Dean, External Relations, and Faculty Chair, The Harvard Business School Campaign
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  • Thomas C. Barry (MBA 1969), President and CEO, Zephyr Management, L.P.
  • Jean-Pierre Conte (MBA 1989), Chairman and Managing Director, Genstar Capital
  • Bryan C. Cressey (MBA 1974), Cressey & Co.
  • Mark Nunnelly (MBA 1984), Bain Capital

Panel – Real Estate

Moderator: Arthur I. Segel, Poorvu Family Professor of Management Practice
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  • Gaëtan L. Hannecart (MBA 1994), Managing Partner & CEO, Matexi Group, Inc.
  • W. Matt Kelly (MBA 2004), Managing Partner, The JBG Companies, Inc.
  • Alexander Otto (MBA 1994), CEO, ECE Projektmanagement Gmbh & Co Kg
  • Sid Yog (MBA 2004), Co-Founder & Managing Partner, The Xander Group Inc.

Panel – Technological Developments and Evolution

Moderator: Furqan A. Nazeeri (MBA 1999), Entrepreneur-in-Residence, Softbank Capital
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  • Laetitia Garriott de Cayeux (MBA 2004), Founder and Chief Information Officer, Ajna Partners
  • Sonam Saxena (MBA 2009), Senior Product Manager, Microsoft
  • Anthony C. Soohoo (MBA 1999), Co-Founder & CEO, Dot & Bo Inc.
  • Christopher A. Withers (MBA 2004), Head of Cognitive Computing, IBM Corporation

Panel – The Thrills and Spills of Entrepreneurship

Moderator: Thomas R. Eisenmann (MBA 1983), Howard H. Stevenson Professor of Business Administration
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  • Jennifer Y. Hyman (MBA 2009), CEO and co-Founder, Rent the Runway
  • Asif R. Satchu (MBA 1999), Co-Chairman and Co-CEO, Media Rights Capital
  • Elizabeth R. Whitman (MBA 2009), Cofounder and president, Manicube
  • Alexandra Wilkis Wilson (MBA 2004), Founder and Head of Strategic Alliances, Gilt

Panel – Venture Capital

Moderator: William A. Sahlman (MBA 1975), Dimitri V. D'Arbeloff - MBA Class of 1955 Professor of Business Administration, and Senior Associate Dean for External Relations
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  • Howard Cox (MBA 1969), Advisory Partner, Greylock Partners
  • Doug Mackenzie (MBA 1989), Partner, Radar Partners
  • Paul A. Maeder (MBA 1984), Founding General Partner, Highland Capital Partners
  • Jim White (MBA 1989), Managing Director, Sutter Hill Ventures

Panel – Women Led Startups: Overlooked and Undervalued?

Welcome and Introduction: Nitin Nohria, George F. Baker Professor of Business Administration, and Dean of the Faculty
Moderator: Shikhar Ghosh, Senior Lecturer, Mel Tukman Faculty Fellow

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  • Edith P. Dorsen (MBA 1985), cofounder, Women’s Venture Capital Fund
  • Jennifer Lee Koss (MBA 2008), cofounder, Builder of Business, BRIKA
  • Janet J. Kraus, CEO of Peach and Entrepreneur in Residence, HBS
  • Jules Pieri (MBA 1986), co-founder and CEO, The Grommet; Entrepreneur in Residence, HBS

Early this year Forbes declared that there are “11 Reasons Why 2014 Will Be a Breakout Year for Women Entrepreneurs.” While women represent an increasingly powerful force in the economy, when it comes to venture capital, 90 percent of capital is invested in management teams that include no women. Today opportunities abound to find and invest in potentially undervalued startups featuring women in leadership roles. This panel will discuss the challenges faced by female entrepreneurs, the opportunities for investors, and whether the entire landscape is ripe for change.


Nitin Nohria, George F. Baker Professor of Business Administration and
Dean of the Faculty

Welcome: Robert Steven Kaplan (MBA 1983), Martin Marshall Professor of Management Practice in Business Administration, Senior Associate Dean, External Relations, and Faculty Chair, The Harvard Business School Campaign

Speaker: Nitin Nohria, George F. Baker Professor of Business Administration, and Dean of the Faculty

Mallory Stark, Curriculum Services Specialist, Knowledge and Library Services
and Deb Wallace, Executive Director, Knowledge and Library Services

Did you know that alumni privileges at HBS include access to the world-class resources at Baker Library for your career and professional research needs? Knowledge and Library Services will provide an overview of these services available for job and career research, exploring trends and ideas, investigating new markets, starting and growing a business, or digging deeper into the subjects covered in the reunion panel discussions.

Related Resources:
Spring 2014 Presentation Slides (Stark & Wallace)