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The Progress Principle

Teresa M. Amabile, Edsel Bryant Ford Professor of Business Administration and Director of Research
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What really makes people happy, motivated, productive, and creative at work? Our new research, based on analyzing nearly 12,000 daily diaries of team members working on collaborative creative projects, reveals some surprising answers. Inner work life—a person's day-by-day emotions, perceptions and motivation—has a profound effect on the person's creative productivity. And, of all the good things that can boost inner work life, the single most important is simply making progress on meaningful work—even if that progress is a small step forward. This is the Progress Principle. Its implication? Sustained creative productivity and employee well-being depend less on elaborate incentive systems or performance-management processes than on techniques for facilitating the small wins that constitute daily work progress.

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Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


Manufacturing Morals: A View From Within HBS

Michel Anteby, Associate Professor of Business Administration
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How are morals manufactured? To start answering this question, the session will preview the results of an ethnographic project focused on HBS and titled "Manufacturing Morals: The Values of Silence in Business School Education." With an initial goal of promoting better business standards, few organizations have aimed to produce higher morals as deliberately as HBS. Moreover, few have done so on such a large scale. The session will look at HBS faculty socialization dynamics as a window into such a pursuit. If you have ever wondered what faculty members do, this session is for you.

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Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


How Do You Harness Human Nature for Global Health

Nava Ashraf, Associate Professor, MBA Class of 1966 Faculty Research Fellow and Atul Gawande, MD, MPH, Founder and Director, Ariadne Labs: A Joint Center for Health Systems Innovation
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Each year, there are more than 13 million deaths from health conditions for which there exist safe, effective, and affordable prevention and treatment methods. Billions of dollars have been invested in global health, yet the gap between the existence of health technologies and their consistent use when people need them persists. Progress toward ending the update gap requires a deep knowledge of the decision-making processes of both the consumer/patient and the caregiver. The challenge is not necessarily a lack of resources or knowledge but, rather, designing health products, services, and work in a way that creates greatest impact.

Professors Gawande and Ashraf, in separate field experiments and work around the world, have identified the critical levers of checklists, norms, and behavioral design. In this session, they present a short overview of their respective work and then engage in a dialogue on what works and what doesn't when we're trying to enable systems that produce better healthcare.

Nava Ashraf is Associate Professor at HBS, where she teaches the EC course Managing Global Health: Applying Behavioral Economics to Create Impact. Atul Gawande is a surgeon at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Professor at Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School, and Director of Ariadne Labs: A Joint Center for Health System Innovation. He is also the author of Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an Imperfect Science; Better; and The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


Secrets of Effective Change Agents: The Power of Networks

Julie Battilana, Associate Professor of Business Administration
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Instituting change has always been the bane of leaders. Numerous studies show that employees tend to instinctively oppose such initiatives because they disrupt established positions, power structures, and ways of getting things done. At the same time, much of their resistance is not overt or even conscious. So change agents must infer people's attitudes and then work to bring them on side. However, some leaders do succeed—often spectacularly—at transforming their organizations. What makes one manager triumph in a situation when the vast majority would fail? Existing models of change management provide only partial answers as to why the results are so variable. So we set out to investigate what successful change agents do differently, focusing on organizations in which size, complexity, history, and tradition make it exceptionally difficult to push change through. Our findings were striking. They show that the network of relationships that change agents establish with colleagues in their organization is essential to their ability to push change through. The most effective change agents relied on three network "secrets" to get their initiatives adopted, and in so doing, they offer lessons for anyone trying to effect change, whether you are the boss or a middle manager.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


How Will You Measure Your Life?

Clayton M. Christensen, Kim B. Clark Professor of Business Administration
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Professor Christensen tackles the question of how to live a happy, meaningful, purpose-filled life. Even before his stroke and cancer diagnosis, Christensen routinely questioned his students not just about their career ambitions but about what they hoped for in their lives. He extends that conversation here, distilling lessons learned from studying businesses over the course of his academic career and spinning them into deeply personal wisdom. He draws on examples from companies such as Intel, Disney, and Iridium to illustrate how to align actions, time, and resources with priorities; manage relationships; and even improve parenting. He interweaves personal stories into these lessons, including his early, never realized desire to be the editor of the Wall Street Journal; being fired from a CEO job; his passion for teaching; and his own parenting experiences.

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Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


Decent Profit, Decently: Innovative Financial Services for the World's Poor

Shawn A. Cole, Associate Professor of Business Administration
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In the next 20 years, more than a billion people in emerging markets will enter the formal financial system. This transformation represents a tremendous opportunity, as low-income households gain access to savings, credit, and risk-management services for the first time. But it also poses significant risks, for poorly designed or improperly distributed financial products can harm consumers, push firms to bankruptcy, and undermine economic growth. Drawing on insights from behavioral finance, marketing, and economics, this session will describe what is necessary to build an inclusive financial system, one that allows firms to profitably offer financial services and customers to select products that improve their welfare. How can, and how should, firms design innovative products for a population traditionally thought impossible to serve profitably? Faced with a range of new and complex products, will consumers make good decisions, or will low financial literacy and behavioral biases limit potential gains?

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Fall 2013 Presentation Slides
Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


How to Boost Your Power through Body Language

Amy J.C. Cuddy, Associate Professor of Business Administration and Hellman Faculty Fellow
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Our judgments of others—and their judgments of us—are largely based on nonverbal cues, such as how we stand, move, and smile. By making simple adjustments to our own nonverbal behaviors, we change how powerful we feel and how powerful we appear to others. Recent behavioral science breakthroughs reveal how body language affects our hormone levels, thoughts, feelings, behaviors, and interactions. This session focuses on how we can embody power through minimal adjustments that lead to high-impact outcomes.

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Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


The Rise and Fall of Family Wealth

John A. Davis, Senior Lecturer of Business Administration
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Wealth and the motivation to create wealth is a predominant force in society, and yet there has been little formal study of the creation of wealth or its impact on the families who possess it. Davis discusses the major issues that wealth presents to a family and how families successfully manage both the opportunities and challenges created by wealth.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


Why Smart People Won't Change

Thomas J. DeLong, Philip J. Stomberg Professor of Management Practice
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Many people with a high need for achievement find the process of individual change very difficult. Some professionals resign themselves to organizational, personal, and life situations that are miserable or where they feel caught. Professor DeLong discusses individual motivation and how to leverage the opportunities that confront people in their professional and private lives. The presentation is based on DeLong's book, Flying Without A Net: Turn Fear of Change Into Fuel for Success.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


Innocents Abroad: Lessons about Emerging Market Investing from Recent Research

Mihir A. Desai, Mizuho Financial Group Professor of Finance and Senior Associate Dean for Planning and University Affairs
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With tempting growth projections, emerging markets continue to attract institutional and individual investors. What have we learned about the perils and rewards of investing in emerging markets?

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Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


Case Discussion - Terror at the Taj Bombay: Customer-Centric Leadership "The Ordinary Heroes of the Taj"

Rohit Deshpandé, Sebastian S. Kresge Professor of Marketing
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Join a case discussion about the bravery and resourcefulness shown by the rank-and-file employees of the Taj Mahal Palace and Tower luxury hotel during the terrorist attacks that took place in Mumbai, India, on Nov. 26, 2008. Excerpts from the "Terror at the Taj" multimedia case will be shown during the session, featuring video interviews with hotel staff and executives combined with security footage of the attack, which create a documentary-like account of the events that took place. The case also covers the hotel's history, its approach to training, and the "guest is God" philosophy inherent in Indian culture. Why did the Taj employees stay at their posts, jeopardizing their safety in order to save hotel guests? And is this level of loyalty and dedication something that can be replicated and scaled elsewhere?

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View Case


Building a Performance-Driven Social Sector

Alnoor Ebrahim, Associate Professor of Business Administration
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How can social sector organizations such as social enterprises, nonprofits, and foundations better measure their performance in order to drive social change? Should they measure short-term results that they can control, or aim for long-term results under conditions of limited control? Associate Professor Ebrahim discusses his research on innovative organizations that are attempting to crack this problem, and he leads a conversation about the future of this field.


Google and Facebook

Benjamin G. Edelman, Associate Professor of Business Administration and Marvin Bower Fellow; John A. Deighton, Harold M. Brierley Professor of Business Administration and Mikolaj Jan Piskorski, Associate Professor of Business Administration and Richard Hodgson Fellow
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Ford and the Model T changed the physical world. The Internet is changing the mental world. First there was Google, which put a dent in world ignorance, and later Facebook, which did the same for global loneliness. Do these virtues come at a cost? They alter the line between private life and life in the marketplace; they change the balance of information between buyers and sellers; they turn word of mouth from a one-to-one sharing activity to one-to-many broadcasting. And as Google enters Facebook's domain with Google+, what will happen to the balance of information-age power?

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


Teaming: How the Learning Organization Works

Amy C. Edmondson, Novartis Professor of Leadership and Management
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This talk reviews research on interpersonal dynamics that affect organizational learning. Teaming – the dynamic interactions through which interdependent work is carried out – emphasizes the action rather than the structures of teamwork. This perspective on organizational learning emerged through field research in settings ranging from the front lines of health care delivery, to the Space Shuttle program at NASA, to the management conference room. It emphasizes the debilitating effects of interpersonal fear and examines the role of leadership in counteracting these effects.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


Innovating at Frontiers of Art & Science

David A. Edwards, Gordon McKay Professor of the Practice of Biomedical Engineering, Harvard University Faculty of Arts and Sciences
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The famous divide between the arts and sciences has emerged as one of the most exciting contemporary settings for learning and discovery. In this talk Professor Edwards describes a new art & science public engagement paradigm that guides learning and discovery toward disruptive innovation. This paradigm, explored in recent years at the School of Engineering & Applied Sciences at Harvard University, and spun out in the form of ArtScience Labs, forms the basis of a cultural incubator (Le Laboratoire) next to the Louvre in Paris, and a new Cambridge cultural incubator to open in 2014 (The Lab Cambridge) next to MIT. Via these public art and design centers ArtScience Labs engages leading international artists, designers and scientists in public experimentation that assumes the form of cultural exhibitions and innovative food experiences. Several of these have led over recent years to unusual consumer product platform technologies and Cambridge-area startups, backed by Polaris Partners and Flagship Ventures. These include edible packaging, or WikiCells, by which foods and beverages are packaged in fruit-like skins and shells; breathable food, or the Aero, the basis of AeroShot Energy that presently sells in around 20,000 stores in the USA, and the new Ophone, by which Onotes and Otracks can be generated and exchanged with the facility of email and text messaging.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


Next Generation Program: Lit Motors (Case Discussion for Kids)

Thomas R. Eisenmann, Howard H. Stevenson Professor of Business Administration
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Next Generation Program: Case Discussion for Kids: Lit Motors is an early-stage startup developing a revolutionary electric-powered, gyroscope-stablized, two-wheeled vehicle that is easy to park and fun to drive like a motorcycle, and fully-enclosed to protect the driver like a car. The case describes how founder Danny Kim, despite having raised only $720,000 from angel investors, developed a working full-scale prototype and tested demand for his concept, and asks what Danny should do next to turn his dream into a reality.

Parents are welcome to watch a simulcast of the case discussion from an adjacent room.


The Lean Startup

Thomas R. Eisenmann, Howard H. Stevenson Professor of Business Administration
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Entrepreneurs who follow the "lean startup" approach strive to avoid wasting time and money. As quickly as possible, they launch a "minimum viable product" (MVP) with the smallest feature set necessary to rigorously test hypotheses about their opportunity, based on feedback from early adopters. They rapidly iterate this MVP based on a succession of tests, and pivot to a new product design, market segment, or business model when hypotheses are disproved. Professor Eisenmann describes how lean startup principles are being taught in the required first-year MBA course, The Entrepreneurial Manager, and applied in the new FIELD course, which requires all first-year students to launch a new venture. He also discusses the Rock Accelerator Program, a competition through which HBS this year made $5,000 grants to twenty MBA startups based in part on the quality of MVP tests they proposed.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


PANEL: The Thrills and Spills of Entrepreneurship

Thomas R. Eisenmann, Howard H. Stevenson Professor of Business Administration (moderator)
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Marc Cenedella, MBA 1998
Founder and Executive Chairman
TheLadders, Inc.

Jennifer Lee Koss, MBA 2008
Cofounder
BRIKA

Sheila Lirio Marcelo, MBA 1998
Founder and CEO
Care.com

David Andrew Vivero, MBA 2008
Founder and CEO
RentJuice
formerly VP Rentals
Zillow


Blockbusters: Hit-making, Risk-taking, and the Big Business of Entertainment

Anita Elberse, Lincoln Filene Professor of Business Administration
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What is the effect of digital technology on the entertainment industries and their business models? In this session, Professor Elberse previews her new book, Blockbusters (launched in October 2013), in which she shows that although digital technologies are undeniably transforming the entertainment landscape, building a business around blockbuster bets remains the surest path to long-term success. Along the way, she reveals why the search for the next blockbuster is so costly, why superstars are paid unimaginable sums, and which strategies give leaders in film, television, music, publishing, and sports an edge over their rivals in the digital age.


50 Years of Women at HBS: Findings and Insights on the "Life and Leadership After HBS" Study

Robin J. Ely, Diane Doerge Wilson Professor of Business Administration, and Senior Associate Dean for Culture and Community
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An expert in the field of gender, race, and organizational change, Professor Ely leads the HBS Culture and Community Initiative (CCI), a multiyear effort to advance inclusion, one of the School's five priorities. Integral to the CCI is the School's commemoration of the 50th anniversary of women being admitted to the two-year MBA program. The School is using the occasion to ask the question, What can HBS do, what can organizations do, what can individual women and men do to ensure that women are thriving and reaching their potential for exercising leadership in the world? HBS began the commemoration with the study of "Life and Leadership After HBS," a survey of the School's 12,000 women graduates and 14,000 men on their aspirations, career choices, and other life decisions. Professor Ely shares findings and insights from the survey and other school-wide efforts.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


Sidetracked: Why Our Decisions Get Derailed, and How We Can Stick to the Plan

Francesca Gino, Associate Professor of Business Administration
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Associate Professor Gino has long studied the factors at play when judgment and decision-making collide with the results of people's choices in real life. She will explore how inconsistent decisions play out in a wide range of circumstances - from people's roles as consumers and employees (what they buy, how they manage others) to the choices that they make more broadly as human beings (who they date, how they deal with friendships). She will discuss when a mismatch is most likely to occur between what people want and what they end up doing. Participants will learn what people can do to correct for the subtle influences that derail decisions, to better understand the nuances of their decisions and how they get derailed - so they have more control over keeping them on track.


Is Japan Headed toward the Same Fate as Greece?

Robin Greenwood, George Gund Professor of Finance and Banking
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Professor Greenwood will discuss the case "Hayman Capital Management," which concerns an investor's investment decision on Japan. Japan has the world's highest debt burden, whether expressed as a percentage of GDP or government revenue. Guided by recent global events, Professor Greenwood will lead a discussion about whether Japan will have the same fate as Greece or, alternatively, whether a smooth landing is in store, as well as the broader role that investors have played in recent global economic fluctuations.


Digital Strategy

Sunil Gupta, Edward W. Carter Professor of Business Administration
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Digital and mobile technologies have transformed the way consumers interact with each other, obtain information, and buy products. This has a dramatic impact on industry dynamics and firms' business models. Professor Gupta will discuss trends in digital technology and a framework for formulating digital strategy.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


Healing Ourselves: Addressing Healthcare's Innovation Challenge

Richard G. Hamermesh, MBA Class of 1961 Professor of Management Practice
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Innovation is central to any sound approach—whether private or public—to healthcare reform. Recognizing this fact, Harvard Business School and Harvard Medical School created the Forum on Healthcare Innovation, a collaboration to identify key actions that can be taken to stimulate innovation across all sectors of the industry. This session summarizes the findings of the forum's inaugural conference of healthcare leaders—which took place at HBS in November 2012—and the companion Survey of Executive Sentiment in Healthcare.

Related Resources:
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides
Fall 2013 Video: "Making a Difference in Health Care at HBS"


The Allure of the Long Tail: The History of Venture Capital in America

G. Felda Hardymon, MBA Class of 1975 Professor of Management Practice; and Tom Nicholas, William J. Abernathy Professor of Business Administration
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The venture–capital industry represents one of the most significant mechanisms for growth, innovation, and wealth accumulation in history and, like jazz, baseball, and blue jeans, it appears to be an American invention. Professors Hardymon and Tom Nicholas have started the HBS History of Venture Capital project to study this industry, which is closely identified with HBS; by some estimates, about 25% of professional VCs are HBS graduates. This session draws on the course Venture Capital in Historical Perspective and examines early hybrid models for entrepreneurial financing, pioneers such as Georges Doriot and Arthur Rock, and the pivotal firms that created a pathway to modern venture finance. It also documents the rise of hotspots like Silicon Valley. The objective is to look at the industry's past as a guide to the present and the future.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


Health Care, What's Next?

Regina E. Herzlinger, Nancy R. McPherson Professor of Business Administration
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Professor Herzlinger will discuss the impact of the healthcare reform legislation on the US healthcare system and economy.


Being the Boss

Linda A. Hill, Wallace Brett Donham Professor of Business Administration
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Are you a great boss or a good boss? Professor Hill leads a case discussion and discusses the imperatives of leadership.

Related Resources:
Case available here.
Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


Healing Ourselves: Addressing Healthcare's Innovation Challenge

Robert S. Huckman, Albert J. Weatherhead III Professor of Business Administration
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Innovation is central to any sound approach—whether private or public—to healthcare reform. Recognizing this fact, Harvard Business School and Harvard Medical School created the Forum on Healthcare Innovation, a collaboration to identify key actions that can be taken to stimulate innovation across all sectors of the industry. This session summarizes the findings of the forum's inaugural conference of healthcare leaders—which took place at HBS in November 2012—and the companion Survey of Executive Sentiment in Healthcare.

Related Resources:
Summer 2013 Report: 5 Imperatives for Addressing Healthcare's Innovation Challenge (pdf)


Harvard Innovation Lab Presentation and Tour

Gordon Jones, Managing Director, Harvard Innovation Lab; and Joseph B. Lassiter, Senator John Heinz Professor of Management Practice in Environmental Management
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Newly opened in Nov. 2011, the Innovation Lab, or i-Lab, is designed to foster team-based and entrepreneurial activities and to deepen interactions among students, faculty, entrepreneurs, and the Boston community. The lab provides public areas and meeting rooms designed to foster project work as well as business development resources for companies, nonprofits, entrepreneurs, and other individuals in the Allston-Brighton neighborhood and Boston area. This is a central place where students, practitioners, and local businesses can work together, share knowledge, and collaborate on ideas.


Cultures of Confidence, Dynamics of Decline, and How to Turn Around Nearly Anything

Rosabeth M. Kanter, Ernest L. Arbuckle Professor of Business Administration
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This presentation provides a guide to leadership action in a networked world of volatility and change. It identifies the surprisingly universal behaviors associated with the momentum of growth or decline across industries or countries. It covers topics related to effective turnarounds of businesses, sports teams, schools, health centers, communities, and even family relationships, including:

  • how values-based leadership can reverse decline and build cultures of confidence by stressing purpose and principles over short-term gains
  • the connection between collaboration and innovation: how the community supports the entrepreneur
  • how small investments and small wins can have catalytic chain reactions that can revive stagnating regions or relationships
  • leadership actions that can turn ordinary organizations of all sizes into "SuperCorps" that can perform seeming miracles
  • inclusion and empowerment as keys to resilience


Value-Based Healthcare Delivery: Solving the Cost Crisis in Healthcare

Robert S. (Bob) Kaplan, Marvin Bower Professor of Leadership Development, Emeritus
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This session provides a state-of-the-art summary of the Porter-Kaplan value-based healthcare project. Value-based competition rewards entities that deliver superior outcomes at lower costs. Until now, however, healthcare providers did not measure either their clinical outcomes or their costs, so that value-based competition was not feasible. Michael Porter, in 2012, established the International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurements to facilitate outcomes measurement and global benchmarking. Professor Kaplan is introducing time-driven, activity-based costing at two dozen sites for accurate and transparent costing at the individual patient level. These two initiatives promise to transform the economics of the healthcare industry by accelerating the introduction of innovative reimbursement approaches. Bundled payments for treating a given clinical condition will reward providers that deliver the best outcomes at the lowest cost, not those that perform multiple and expensive procedures.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


What You're Really Meant to Do

Robert Steven Kaplan, Martin Marshall Professor of Management Practice in Business Administration and Senior Associate Dean for External Relations
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How do you reach your unique potential? How can you manage yourself in order to meet this lifelong challenge? This talk will discuss a roadmap for creating one's own definition of success—and then achieving it.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


American Public Education Reform: What's Next

John Jong-Hyun Kim, Senior Lecturer of Business Administration
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American Public Education Reform — What's Next? More than 15,000 public school districts operate in the United States, spending approximately $600 billion annually. There are more students enrolled in public schools today — nearly 50 million — than at any point in the history of the United States. The 100 largest districts serve approximately 22% of total students and 35% of the nation's minority students. While pockets of high performance exist in these large systems, excellence at scale remains an elusive goal in education. The costs of inconsistent quality of schooling — particularly for minority students — are tremendous, amounting to nearly a trillion dollars a year in GDP. Even with existing political and governance constraints, school districts could perform considerably better. There are many reform efforts underway ranging from federal and state governments' taking a more proactive role in school reform to education technology start-ups seeking ways to integrate technology to improve learning. At HBS, the Public Education Leadership Project (PELP), a joint HBS-HGSE project, was established in January 2004 to build management knowledge and leadership capacity in urban school districts. This session will explore some of the education reform efforts currently underway in the United States.

Related Resources:
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


Leadership in Crisis: Lessons for Here and Now

Nancy F. Koehn, James E. Robison Professor of Business Administration
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Through interactive lecture and visual images, this presentation explores three examples of effective leadership in moments of great turbulence: Abraham Lincoln's presidency during the Civil War; Antarctic explorer Ernest Shackleton's leadership when his ship, the Endurance, became stuck in the ice in 1915–16, and Rachel Carson's leadership as she tried to outrun cancer in 1962 and finish Silent Spring, the book that would launch the modern environmental movement and change the world. The presentation draws together several key lessons about individual leadership and its impact. It concludes by applying these insights to the current turbulent moment.


The Crowd as an Innovation Partner: Lessons from NASA, Harvard Medical School and Beyond

Karim R. Lakhani, Lumry Family Associate Professor of Business Administration
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Over the last decade, crowd-based modes of organizing for innovation have established themselves firmly within the economy. Crowds are now an important innovation partner to organizations in a range scientific and commercial settings. In this talk, Lakhani discusses the four fundamental modes of organizing crowds and what types of problems are best suited to each mode. Using examples from NASA, the US Space Agency, and the Harvard Medical School, he presents evidence on important factors that determine success and performance when deploying crowds to solve innovation problems. He also discusses the internal challenges of organizations using external innovation through crowds.

Related Resources:
Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


Harvard Innovation Lab Presentation and Tour

Joseph B. Lassiter, Senator John Heinz Professor of Management Practice in Environmental Management and Gordon Jones, Managing Director, Harvard Innovation Lab
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Newly opened in Nov. 2011, the Innovation Lab, or i-Lab, is designed to foster team-based and entrepreneurial activities and to deepen interactions among students, faculty, entrepreneurs, and the Boston community. The lab provides public areas and meeting rooms designed to foster project work as well as business development resources for companies, nonprofits, entrepreneurs, and other individuals in the Allston-Brighton neighborhood and Boston area. This is a central place where students, practitioners, and local businesses can work together, share knowledge, and collaborate on ideas. Join us for a presentation, video, and tour of the Harvard Innovation Lab.


Private Equity at a Crossroads: What's Next?

Josh Lerner, Jacob H. Schiff Professor of Investment Banking
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Both the buyout and venture-capital industries face unprecedented challenges today. After an orgy of investments in the mid-2000s, private-equity funds suffered a hangover of epic proportions. In recent quarters, however, the portfolios of the private equity funds have recovered in a manner that has surprised even the most optimistic observers. Meanwhile, venture capital, after a prolonged drought, shows some signs of recovery. But all is not rosy: many of the investors on which these funds have traditionally depended, such as endowments and pensions, have deep problems, which is affecting the flow of capital to the sector. This talk explores this unsettled and often mysterious territory and offers some surprising predictions about the future of these sectors.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


Powerful Politicians: Earmarks, Social Connections, and Insider Trading

Christopher J. Malloy, Associate Professor of Business Administration and Marvin Bower Fellow
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This session investigates links between US politicians and corporate America. It explores the process by which powerful politicians use their power to obtain earmarks and increased government spending for their home states. It shows that this type of government spending has distortionary effects on private-sector economic activity, in the form of reduced investment and R&D by corporations. It demonstrates that social connections among politicians, and between politicians and firms, have a significant impact on the voting behavior of legislators. Lastly, it investigates recent claims that politicians may be trading on illegal insider information in their personal stock portfolios.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


Can China Lead?

F. Warren McFarlan, Baker Foundation Professor and Albert H. Gordon Professor of Business Administration, Emeritus
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Can China sustain its remarkable emergence of the past 35 years is the subject of Professor F. Warren McFarlan's forthcoming HBR Press book, Can China Lead? Reaching the Limits of Power and Growth, coauthored with Regina M. Abrami and William C. Kirby, to be published in January 2014. Looking at the subject respectively through the lenses of a historian, a political economist, and a general management scholar, the book's answer is almost surely "No." For multiple reasons, China will be a leader, but not the leader. Professor McFarlan will talk about both the challenges and opportunities for those seeking to do business with and within China over the next several decades.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


Putting the Financial Crisis in Perspective: What History Tells Us about the Crisis, and What We Can Expect Next

David A. Moss, John G. McLean Professor of Business Administration
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In his talk, Professor Moss briefly examines the history of financial crises and financial regulation in the United States and suggest what this history reveals about the recent crisis and how best to ensure a healthy and stable financial system going forward. He also assesses the current state of the financial system and considers whether the worst of the turmoil is truly ever, or another round is still yet to come.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


When Leaders Make a Difference

Gautam Mukunda, Assistant Professor of Business Administration
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Assistant Professor Mukunda will describe how his research, detailed in his new book, Indispensable: When Leaders Really Matter, shows when and how individual leaders in fields as diverse as politics, business, and science can save or destroy the organizations they lead.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


Leveraging Service Excellence

Das Narayandas, James J. Hill Professor of Business Administration, Senior Associate Dean for HBS Publishing, and Senior Associate Dean, Chair, Executive Education
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Firms are increasingly looking towards service excellence to augment their core offerings and create sustainable differentiation that, in turn, increases customer retention and profitability. This cascading model (i.e., the Service Profit Chain) has been studied extensively over the years by various faculty at HBS. This talk examines specific initiatives and actions that firms can implement to ensure and enhance the success of their service excellence strategies.


Reinventing the MBA: Action Learning and the New FIELD course at HBS

Felix Oberholzer-Gee, Andreas Andresen Professor of Business Administration and Senior Associate Dean for International Development
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Field Immersion Experience for Leadership Development (FIELD) is an innovative new First Year Required Course that helps students put theories into practice, working in small teams on intensive projects to solve real-world problems. Created to complement the school's traditional case-based method of pedagogy, FIELD provides a rigorous new platform for students to develop skills that focus on hands-on learning, teamwork, and self-awareness. In this session, Professor Oberholzer-Gee describes the objectives of FIELD and how these are realized in a design that includes learning about effective leadership styles, engaging in a global immersion experience in one of twelve emerging markets, and taking a business idea from concept to fruition over the course of a single semester.


Winning in Emerging Markets

Krishna G. Palepu, Ross Graham Walker Professor of Business Administration
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This presentation is based on a book published by Tarun Khanna and Krishna Palepu, Winning in Emerging Markets: A Road Map for Strategy and Execution. The presentation will discuss: Unique opportunities and challenges in operating in fast rising emerging markets of the world. Using case examples, the presentation discusses strategic and execution ideas for success in emerging markets for western multinationals, international investors, and new multinationals being created from emerging markets.

Related Resources:
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


It Doesn't Have to be This Way: A New Model for Thriving in Our Over-connected and Hyper-efficient World

Leslie A. Perlow, Konosuke Matsushita Professor of Leadership
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What happens when you impose tremendous changes in the workplace — ubiquitous technology, 24/7 globalization and hyper-efficiency — but fail to change the way you work? We have become less efficient, unable to plan or prioritize work; less effective, with speed substituting for strategy and innovation; more isolated, as technology (paradoxically) reduces real human interaction; overwhelmed, unable to plan or collaborate; and more harried, as the dividing line between work and home disappears. But it doesn't have to be this way. Professor Perlow's research shows that we must go beyond simply accommodating these recent developments — we must change the work itself. She will share an exciting new approach and the impressive results: improved performance for companies and better lives for workers.


Producing Prosperity: Why America Needs Manufacturing Renaissance

Gary P. Pisano, Harry E. Figgie, Jr. Professor of Business Administration
Willy C. Shih, Robert and Jane Cizik Professor of Management Practice in Business Administration
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In this session, Professors Pisano and Shih, drawing from their recent book, Producing Prosperity, will discuss the competitive position of the US in the global economy, and why a strong manufacturing sector is critical to America's capacity for innovation and long-term economic health. They will discuss how both management and public policies are critical to restoring the health of America's eroding "industrial commons."

Related Resources:
Spring 2013 Presentation Slides
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


The Looming Challenge to U.S. Competitiveness

Michael E. Porter, Bishop William Lawrence University Professor
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The United States is a competitive location to the extent that firms operating in the U.S. are able to compete successfully in the global economy while supporting high and rising living standards for the average American. Seen through this lens, America is suffering from long-term structural decline. Two surveys of nearly 10,000 HBS alumni show that the U.S. retains profound competitive strengths—for instance, in higher education and entrepreneurship. But those strengths are increasingly threatened by weaknesses in areas such as the tax code, basic education, macroeconomic policies, and regulation. To reverse the decline, business leaders can and must take action and commit to improving America's competitiveness.

Read about ways your business can help improve U.S. competitiveness and follow our latest research, including articles on the imperatives of U.S. federal policy, the role of business—and "Prosperity at Risk" and "Competitiveness at a Crossroads,"— two reports on Harvard Business School's alumni surveys on U.S. competitiveness, on the U.S. competitiveness website."

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Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


Extreme Productivity: Boost Your Results, Reduce Your Hours

Robert C. Pozen, Senior Lecturer of Business Administration
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In this talk, Pozen will share his practical suggestions on how to get more done at work, taken from his new book on personal productivity. His key concept is: focus on the results you achieve, not the hours you log. Specifically, he will discuss how to: 1) set and prioritize goals, 2) establish a daily routine in the office and on the road, 3) read and write more effectively, 4) manage up and down the corporate ladder, and 5) improve decisions about career and work/life balance. This talk is for anyone feeling overwhelmed by an existing workload, facing many competing demands and multiple project deadlines.


Twenty-First Century Energy

Forest L. Reinhardt, John D. Black Professor of Business Administration
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The world of energy is in turmoil: technological innovations on the supply side, exploding demand from developing nations, shifts in the geopolitical landscape, and pressures on the natural environment seem to render much of what people thought they knew about the economics and politics of energy obsolete. But is this really true? How can people make sense of these seismic shifts? What will the energy industries of the future look like? Who will benefit from the changes, and who will suffer? Drawing on the fundamental ideas of strategy and leadership that alumni remember from their time at HBS, participants will attempt some answers to these complicated questions.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


Urbanization and the Future of China

Meg Rithmire, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, Hellman Faculty Fellow
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Urbanization in China during the past thirty years is both a construction project and a process of human migration of historically unparalleled scale, yet proceeding without private property rights over land and despite restricted citizenship for rural-to-urban migrants. Professor Rithmire will make sense of the contradictions of the Chinese urban project and the possible futures of Chinese capitalism.

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Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


Scandals & Screw-Ups: Wall Street today and What We Should Worry About

Clayton S. Rose, Professor of Management Practice and Chair, MBA Community Standards
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Professor Rose considers the current state and future prospects for the financial system by examining three recent "scandals" or "screw-ups": Barclays' involvement with the LIBOR rate setting, MF Global's failure and JP Morgan's "London Whale" situation. Each case provides different insights into errors in leadership, compliance with the spirit and letter of the rules, and the effectiveness of regulation and regulators, among others. Taken together these cases suggest that the "post-crisis" financial system may require a different approach to leadership and different oversight.


The Market for Smaller Firms

Richard S. Ruback, Willard Prescott Smith Professor of Corporate Finance
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Smaller firms sell for substantially lower multiples than larger firms in similar businesses. These smaller firms—with transaction values below $10 million—typically sell for four times EBITDA, multiples that are half to a third as large as those for comparable larger companies. These low multiples seem to provide enormous opportunities for potential buyers. The magic of small-firm investing is surely these low multiples. This talk offers some thoughts about the market for smaller firms and the dynamics that result in the low multiples for smaller firms.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


The Basis for Optimism

William A. Sahlman, Dimitri V. D'Arbeloff - MBA Class of 1955 Professor of Business Administration and Senior Associate Dean for External Relations
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This talk focuses on the challenges confronting the US and other countries and the entrepreneurial actors who are hard at work finding solutions. If K-12 education is failing in the US, entrepreneurs are designing new systems that are less costly and more effective. If climate change threatens life as we know it, entrepreneurs are searching for scalable, clean, low-cost alternatives to hydrocarbons. That's the basic duality we will discuss.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


PANEL: The Venture Financing Dance: How Investors and Entrepreneurs Find Each Other, Negotiate and Engage

William A. Sahlman, Dimitri V. D'Arbeloff — MBA Class of 1955 Professor of Business Administration; Senior Associate Dean for External Relations (moderator)
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David A. Frankel, MBA 2003
General Partner, Founder
Founder Collective

Aaref A. Hilaly, MBA 1998
Partner
Sequoia Capital

Christopher P. Michel, MBA 1998
Managing Director
Nautilus Ventures

Bejul P. Somaia, MBA 1998
Managing Director
Lightspeed Venture Partners


The Future of Energy in a Changing World

Daniel P. Schrag, Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology, Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering, and Director of the Harvard University Center for the Environment
Less Info

Concerns about climate change and about conventional air pollution have motivated a worldwide effort to eliminate the use of fossil fuels. How much progress has been made? Remarkable improvements in the cost of renewable energy have occurred over the past decade, but the largest innovation has been in hydrocarbon extraction, specifically through improvements in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. How is the world energy system likely to develop over the coming decades, in the face of serious environmental challenges? A variety of strategies are discussed for meeting the world's energy needs with the smallest possible impact on the atmosphere.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


Why I Love Real Estate and Other Such Views on Investing Today

Arthur I. Segel, Poorvu Family Professor of Management Practice

Seven Strategy Questions: A Simple Approach for Better Execution

Robert Simons, Charles M. Williams Professor of Business Administration
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Executing strategy requires tough choices. Unfortunately, many managers avoid choosing in the mistaken belief that they can have it all. Instead of focusing on one primary customer, they try to serve many different types of customers. Instead of instilling values that prioritize the interests of shareholders, customers, and employees, they develop lists of aspirational attributes. Instead of focusing on what could cause their strategy to fail, they build complex scorecards with an overload of measures. The result: disappointing performance and declining market position. To guard against these risks, Professor Simons will review the seven strategy questions that all executives (and directors) should ask to ensure that business leaders are making the tough choices that ensure successful strategy execution and winning in highly competitive, global markets.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


The Wise Leader

Hirotaka Takeuchi, Professor of Management Practice
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To become a wise leader, he or she will have to be many things at the same time:

  • a philosopher who grasps the essence of a problem and draws general conclusions from random observations
  • a master craftsman who understands the key issues of the moment and acts on them immediately
  • an idealist who will do what he believes is right and good for the company and society
  • a politician who can spur people to action
  • a novelist who uses metaphors, stories, and rhetoric
  • a teacher with good values and strong principles, from whom others want to learn

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


How to Profit from "Lean Advertising"

Thales S. Teixeira, Assistant Professor of Business Administration
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This talk introduces the concept of Lean Advertising, i.e., how to use non-traditional approaches to create and distribute advertising using extremely low-cost tools on the Web. The target audience are owners or partners of small and medium firms or marketing managers of brands with small budgets in large firms. The goal is to propose cost-effective ways to promote products and services on a small budget by reaching 80% of the effectiveness of a traditional ad campaign (e.g., on TV) at 20% of the cost. A framework for Lean Advertising is proposed that identifies the four ways in which companies can execute marketing campaigns with low budgets. Special guest Sarah Wood, COO and Founder, Unruly Group Ltd., will offer perspective at the end of the session.

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Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


Why Some Companies Are More Innovative Than Others

Stefan H. Thomke, William Barclay Harding Professor of Business Administration
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Why do companies like Apple constantly come out with exciting innovations while others have great difficulty going beyond traditional product and service offerings? Professor Thomke argues that an organization's ability to innovate depends on constantly experimenting with new products, processes, and business models. He will explain why experimentation is so critical to the management of innovation, underscore the impact of new technologies, and outline what managers must do to integrate them successfully. Drawing on a decade of research in multiple industries as diverse as automotive, semiconductors, pharmaceuticals, chemicals, and banking, he will provide striking illustrations of how companies drive strategy and value creation by accommodating their organizations to experimentation approaches. Participants should think about the session's title and be ready to share their experiences.

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Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


Deficits and Debt in the USA

Richard H.K. Vietor, Paul Whiton Cherington Professor of Business Administration and Senior Associate Dean, Asian Initiative
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Why do companies like Apple constantly come out with exciting innovations while others have great difficulty going beyond traditional product and service offerings? Professor Thomke argues that an organization's ability to innovate depends on constantly experimenting with new products, processes, and business models. He will explain why experimentation is so critical to the management of innovation, underscore the impact of new technologies, and outline what managers must do to integrate them successfully. Drawing on a decade of research in multiple industries as diverse as automotive, semiconductors, pharmaceuticals, chemicals, and banking, he will provide striking illustrations of how companies drive strategy and value creation by accommodating their organizations to experimentation approaches. Participants should think about the session's title and be ready to share their experiences.

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Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


The Founder's Dilemmas: Anticipating and Avoiding the Pitfalls That Can Sink a Startup

Noam T. Wasserman, Associate Professor of Business Administration
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Worried about being blindsided on your entrepreneurial journey? Since 2000, Associate Professor Wasserman has focused on founders' early "people decisions" that tend to get them into trouble down the road. The potential consequences include the splintering of the founding team, the harming of company growth, and being fired as CEO. At this session, he will discuss his award-winning HBS course, Founders' Dilemmas, and his best-selling book, The Founder's Dilemmas: Anticipating and Avoiding the Pitfalls That Can Sink a Startup. The book and the course integrate his research results, quantitative data on 10,000 founders, and case studies to help founders, investors, and others involved in startups understand where their early decisions are likely to lead.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


The Roots of the Debate over Tax Reform

Matthew C. Weinzierl, Associate Professor of Business Administration, Marvin Bower Fellow
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Fundamental tax reform is overdue in the United States. While the outlines of a compromise seem clear, agreement remains elusive. Professor Weinzierl studies the roots of this stalemate, and in this interactive discussion you will explore some of the underlying tensions driving the current debate. You may even come to appreciate the other side of the debate a bit better.

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Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


The Art of Negotiation: How to Improvise Agreement in a Chaotic World

Michael A. Wheeler, MBA Class of 1952 Professor of Management Practice, Retired
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Professor Wheeler presents a fresh and dynamic approach to negotiation, one that challenges the static assumptions of win-win and hard-bargaining models. The simple truth is that negotiation can't be scripted. People can't dictate what other parties will say or do any more than they would let others dominate them. Success thus requires strategic agility and the capacity to be nimble from moment to moment. Professor Wheeler draws practical lessons from masters of improvisation in other fields, including jazz, comedy, competitive sports, and even warfare. He is the author of Art of Negotiation (forthcoming from Simon & Schuster).

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


The Digital Revolution: How Technology Is Changing the World

David B. Yoffie, Max and Doris Starr Professor of International Business Administration
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Cloud computing, social networking, the explosion of smartphones and tablets, and the drive to connect all digital products together are having a profound impact on management, strategies, and the way people live their lives. This session explores the underlying drivers of technological change, the critical trends in technology today, and the impact this revolution will have on tomorrow.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


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"Years of Living Dangerously" at HBS

Daniel Abbasi (MBA 1998), Executive Producer of Years of Living Dangerously and Managing Director of GameChange Capital, LLC
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Human civilization recently surpassed the 400 parts per million threshold of heat-trapping carbon dioxide in Earth's atmosphere. Many now regard the inertia toward devastating climate change as unstoppable. Others refuse to give up. With backing from Chris Cooper-Hohn, MBA 1993, Jeremy Grantham, MBA 1966, and other visionaries, Dan Abbasi, MBA 1998, is executive producing with James Cameron, Arnold Schwarzenegger and several 60 Minutes veterans a Showtime TV series called "Years of Living Dangerously". The eight-part series will dramatize the impacts of climate change on Americans and spotlight urgent solutions. At this session, Dan provides a sneak preview of season 1 footage before its 2014 airing. He also engages fellow alumni in helping to shape a new initiative he is launching to harness HBS' powerful alumni network in pressing for a change in climate policy in the U.S. and around the world. This is not about symposia or case studies; it's about action.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


Why is there any life in the universe at all?

Charles Alcock, Professor of Astronomy, Director of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
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The early universe did not offer promising opportunities for life to develop. At the most elementary level, we think life needs a warm place and a mixture of chemical elements, neither of which was present as the universe expanded following the big bang. The universe cooled as it expanded, and was for a few million years at hospitable temperatures, after which it became very cold and profoundly dark. We are now investigating the developments that led to the first stars, the chemical elements, and the circumstances that would permit life to develop, here on Earth, and elsewhere.

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Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


PANEL: Aging Parents — Navigating the Journey Successfully

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Moderator: Janet Simpson Benvenuti (MBA 1985)
Founder and CEO
Circle of Life Partners

Nina Cohn (MBA 1983)
Vice President
Sunrise Senior Living

Mick Koffend (MBA 1988)
Founder
Accountable Aging Care Management

Stephen Spano
Esq., Principal
Spano & Dawicki Elder Law

Are you responsible for aging parents and other loved ones while juggling the demands of your professional career? If so, join a panel of alumni and aging experts to hear about specific strategies and resources for navigating your parents' later years successfully. Learn how to address the legal, financial, medical, and caregiving challenges while enjoying the benefits of multi-generational families. Each participant will receive a copy of Don't Give Up on Me! Supporting Aging Parents Successfully, Janet's highly acclaimed guide through the unpredictable last years of her journey with her own parents. This book has become a must read for adult children who find suddenly, just when life is on overload, that their parents need help.


PANEL: Antares — Harnessing commercial enterprise to improve the health of the poor

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Michael Chu
Senior Lecturer of Business Administration
HBS

Roslyn Payne, MBA '70
President,
Jackson Street Partners, Ltd

Thomas C. Barry, MBA '69
CEO & Founder
Zephyr Management, L.P.

Karsten Lunze, MD, MPH '08, DrPH
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Boston University School of Medicine

Leeda Rashid, MD, MPH '09
Founder of Health Education and Development for Afghanistan

Santiago Ocejo, MPH '10, MBA '14

The health of the poor is vital for the world, but can it also be a business opportunity? Antares, a collaboration between HBS and HSPH, focuses on commercial solutions delivering healthcare for low-income populations. For the past seven years, 100 Harvard graduate students have worked with partner organizations in the field in 12 countries on commercial platforms — from opportunities in the Mississippi Delta through baby incubators in Nepal to combining health and microfinance in Latin America. In the process, Antares impacts organizations, changes students' worldview and engages HBS alumni as advisors. Join a discussion of "lessons learned" and next steps.

Related Resources:
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides: Harvard Antares—Harnessing Private Enterprise for Public Health
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides: Private Enterprise for Public Health
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides: Making a Difference While Making a Profit
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides: Setting Health Priorities—Strategy Versus Tactics


The $1,000 Genome: When Will You Get Your Genome Sequenced?

Kevin Davies Ph.D., Founding Editor and Editor-in-Chief of Bio-IT World and author of The $1,000 Genome
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In 2007, James Watson, who co-discovered the iconic double helix, became the first person to have his personal genome decoded, at a cost of around $1 million. Today, the cost of sequencing an individual's personal genome hovers just above $1,000, and the service is available to anybody with a doctor's note. A British company has even unveiled a disposable sequencing device that doubles as a USB thumb drive. In the clinic, genome analysis is offering life-saving diagnoses and treatment options for cancer patients and ending diagnostic odysseys for children with life-threatening, undiagnosed genetic disorders. But are people overpromising the benefits of genome sequencing and underestimating the risks? Davies spotlights the stunning progress in DNA sequencing technology and its growing impact on the clinic, share his experiences in decoding his own genome, and discuss the medical and ethical implications of personal genomics.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


PANEL: Becoming a Consultant

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Moderator: Bert Ely, (MBA 1968)
President
Ely & Company, Inc.

Steven B. Lehrer, (MBA 1988)
Managing Director
SBLehrer LLC

Robbin Feibus Steif, (MBA 1983)
CEO
LunaMetrics

Scott S. Williams, (TGMP 10 2002)
Founder and CEO
Hitchcock Partners

Gloria Zito, (MBA)
Owner
LaunchM.


How Biology Has Changed the Global Economy, Is Transforming the World's Largest Businesses, and Will Change Even the Human Species

Juan Enriquez (MBA 1986), Managing Director, Excel Venture Management
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We have had 26 species of humans and are now beginning to birth the 27th. As we modify viruses and bacteria to compute, vaccinate, retrovirally treat, or crowd out harmful pathogens, we begin to take direct and deliberate control over the evolution of various species. We are doing the same with bacteria, plants, animals, and ourselves. This changes man from a humanoid that is aware of and modifies its environment into a species that directly and deliberately guides evolution. And this is changing everything, including our life span, religions, ethics, the power of various countries, and, not least, businesses and industries.


The 5 Undeniable Rules of Changing Human Behavior

Keith E. Ferrazzi (MBA 1992), Chief Executive Officer, Ferrazzi Greenlight
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Have you ever set a new year's resolution and not met it? Have you ever wondered why your children can't change bad habits even though they say they will? Has your team ever fallen short of your desired objectives even though everyone agrees the objectives make sense and may even be critical to the group's success? Greenlight Research has studied the biggest barriers to humans changing behavior and the most efficient set of interventions which will help all of us in our own lives and helping others through change.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


PANEL: How Harvard MBAs Are Applying Their Skills in the Shift Toward Triple Bottom Line (People, Planet, Profit) Management

Karen Martinsen Fleming (MBA 1993), Professor and Sustainable MBA Program Director, Green Mountain College (moderator)
Less Info

Bertina G. Ceccarelli, MBA 1993
Executive Vice President, Global Resources
Wildlife Conservation Society

Andrew P. Klump, MBA 2003
Founder and CEO
Clean Energy Associates (China) Limited

Keith Symmers, Jr., MBA 1993
Project Director
First Solar, LLC


PANEL: Management/Unique Way to Run a Company

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Moderator: Raymond Gilmartin, (MBA 1968)
Former Chairman and CEO
Merck & Co., Inc.

Thomas C. Nelson, (MBA 1988)
Chairman, President and CEO
National Gypsum Company

Sir Martin S. Sorrell (MBA 1968)
CEO
WPP plc

Kent J. Thiry, (MBA 1983)
Co-Chairman and CEO
DaVita HealthCare Partners Inc.


Talking with Older Children about Money

Al Halliday, Philanthropic Advisor for Harvard University; and Don Etheridge, Director, Gift Planning at Harvard Business School
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This is an interactive discussion led by Al Halliday, Philanthropic Advisor for Harvard University and Don Etheridge, Director, Gift Planning at Harvard Business School. Al graduated from Harvard College in 1982 and, since returning in 2004, has guided Harvard individuals and families in their decisions about wealth, family and philanthropy. Don joined HBS in 2011, coming from 16 years of private law practice where he served as an estate planner and wealth advisor to several families and family offices. Their experiences of working with families often lead to discussions with parents about the meaning of money and its impact on family members. Al and Don share the insights they've learned through their work, and past discussions with reunion alumni.


PANEL: Helping Your Community

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Moderator: Donald J. Hofmann, Jr., (MBA 1983)
Managing Principal
Crystal Ridge Partners

Richard C. Kane, (MBA 1968)
Board member and past president
HBS Club of NY
Board member
HBSCNY Community Partners
Co-chair
HBSCNY Competitiveness Project
Board member
HBS Alumni Angels of NY

Andy Kaplan, (MBA 1978)
CFO
DonorsChoose.org

Philip A. "Monty" Keithahn, (MBA 1983)
Chairman and CEO
ProGrowth Bank

Robert Steven Williams, (MBA 1988)
Owner
Against the Grain Communications


PANEL: Private Equity

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Moderator: Robert Steven Kaplan (MBA 1983)
Martin Marshall Professor of Management Practice in Business Administration, Senior Associate Dean, External Relations, and Chair, HBS Campaign Planning

Greg Brenneman, (MBA 1988)
Chairman
CCMP Capital Advisors, LLC

Jane Brock-Wilson, (MBA 1983)
Managing Director
Berkshire Partners LLC

Glenn M. Creamer, (MBA 1988)
Senior Managing Director
Providence Equity Partners LLC


PANEL: Thinking About a Second Career? Not Ready to Retire? What is Next?

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Moderator: Frederick C. Lane, (MBA 1973)
Vice Chairman, Investment Banking, Head of the Consumer and Retailing Group
Raymond James

Harry W. Lange, (MBA 1983)
Chairman
Hedonism II, Negril, Jamaica

David R. Lassman, (MBA 1988)
Distinguished Service Professor
Carnegie Mellon University

Hugh C. Macmillan, (MBA 1973)
Retired. Previously Professor (University of Edinburgh) and Partner (KPMG, London)

Laurie Matthews, (MBA 1983)
HBS Career & Professional Development
HBS


PANEL: Real Estate

Less Info

Moderator: John D. Macomber
Senior Lecturer of Business Administration

Daniel P. Friedman, (MBA 1983)
Managing Member
Radiant Partners, LLC

Jay Sugarman, (MBA 1988)
Chairman and CEO
iStar Financial Inc

Charles F. Wu, (MBA 1983)
Managing Director
Baynorth Capital LLC


PANEL: Preparing for & Managing Retirement

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Moderator: G. Thomas McKane, Jr., (MBA 1968)

Jim A. Bricker, (MBA 1973)
Financial Advisor
Bulfinch Group

Mark DiPaolo, (MBA 1988)
Founder
MJ Investments

Jeff J. Hollings, (MBA 1983)
Former Senior Director of Alliances
Eli Lilly and Company

Frances P. Philip, (MBA 1983)
Former Chief Merchandising Officer
L.L. Bean Inc.


The Promise of Stem Cell Science

Douglas Melton PhD, the Thomas Dudley Cabot Professor in the Natural Sciences at Harvard University and an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and a co-director of Harvard's Stem Cell Institute
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Advances in stem cell science have moved closer to the development of new medicines and cellular transplantations for degenerative diseases. This science of how people's bodies are made and maintained by stem cells is also opening a door to regeneration and a life of healthy aging.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


Endowment Management in a Changing World

Jane Mendillo, President and CEO, Harvard Management Company
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The Harvard Management Company (HMC) is dedicated to the management of Harvard University's endowment and related assets. With about 35% of the University's annual budget dependent on endowment income, HMC's goal is to generate strong, sustainable investment returns to support the needs and goals of the university. Over the last 20 years, HMC's average annual return of 12.3% is substantially better than the 7.9% earned by a 60/40 stock/bond portfolio and the 9.2% annual return for the endowment's Policy Portfolio benchmark. HMC benefits by employing a unique model of investment management, using both internal portfolio managers as well as a select set of high quality external investment management firms across a range of asset classes and geographies. This hybrid approach gives Harvard several advantages as an investor, from significant cost savings associated with its internal management platform to greater degrees of market insight and increased nimbleness in taking advantage of investment opportunities.


PANEL: Sustainability and Why It's Here to Stay: Three Alumni Stories

Less Info

Moderator: Ramana Nanda
Associate Professor of Business Administration, Marvin Bower Fellow

Ben G. Henneke, Jr. (MBA 1973)
President
Clean Air Action Corporation
Co-Founder
TIST

Barry L. Rowan (MBA 1983)
EVP and CFO
Cool Planet Energy Systems; he and his wife lead annual trek to Central America with Harvard graduate students.

Paul J. Zofnass (MBA 1973)
President
Environmental Financial Consulting Group

As we enter this stage of our lives and our careers many of us are thinking more about making a lasting difference in our world. Three alumni will describe their passions for sustaining our environment and our society through their investments in renewables businesses, the developing world, and the next generation.


Independent Consulting: How to Thrive as an Elite Executive and Stand Out from the Competition

Jill Miller Perrin, MBA 1985 (SVP); Chris Panagakos, MBA 1991 (Principal); and, Laura J. Klein, MBA 1996 (Principal); all of Client Services, Business Talent Group, LLC
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This presentation focuses on the new world paradigm of independent consulting as a career choice, not simply a transitory professional state. The session covers "hot areas" and future trends for independent consulting and shares how talent can best take advantage of these trends. Key success factors addressed include:

  • Should you launch an independent practice?
  • How to best prepare for an engagement?
  • What project profiles best lend themselves to interim/consulting roles?
  • Expansion of your independent consulting practice.
  • Tenants of success as a top tier consultant.

Related Resources:
Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


Finding Huck Finn: Reclaiming Childhood from a River of Electronic Screens

Michael Ogden Rich, MD, MPH, Mediatrician and Director, Center on Media and Child Health, Children's Hospital Boston, and Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School
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Today's children are growing up in a world transformed by interactive media. How can parents and others who care for children tell if these media are helping or hurting them? How can they make sure that the media environment supports children's health and development? As Mediatrician and director of the Center on Media and Child Health at Boston Children's Hospital, Rich offers research-based, balanced answers to these and other urgent questions about parenting in the digital age.

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Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


Living an Extraordinary Life

Stever Robbins (MBA 1991), Executive Coach, Stever Robbins, Inc.
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How would life change if you committed to living only a life that you defined as extraordinary? In this highly-practical presentation Stever uses his own experience to identify the myths about jobs and careers that we buy into that just don't work, and practical strategies that do. The material in this presentation draws from Stever's own experiment in extraordinary living, but is also grounded in multidisciplinary science and research. By the time we're done, we'll cover topics from entrepreneurship, decision-making, learning, and career planning. You'll walk away with new insight into how you've shaped your lives, and specific strategies for making minor or major changes in pursuit of whatever life you define as extraordinary.

You'll learn:

  • Planning a life doesn't work very well, but there are other things you can do instead.
  • Fear isn't what holds us back; habit is. Even when we desperately want change.
  • Intelligence, willpower, and drive aren't the keys to having the life you want. Systems and people are.

The Future of Energy in a Changing World

Daniel P. Schrag, Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology, Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering, and Director of the Harvard University Center for the Environment
Less Info

Concerns about climate change and about conventional air pollution have motivated a worldwide effort to eliminate the use of fossil fuels. How much progress has been made? Remarkable improvements in the cost of renewable energy have occurred over the past decade, but the largest innovation has been in hydrocarbon extraction, specifically through improvements in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. How is the world energy system likely to develop over the coming decades, in the face of serious environmental challenges? A variety of strategies will be discussed for meeting the world's energy needs with the smallest possible impact on the atmosphere.

Related Resources:
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


Towards a Remembrance of Things Past: Deciphering Alzheimer's Disease

Dennis J. Selkoe, MD, The Vincent and Stella Coates Professor of Neurologic Diseases, Harvard Medical School and Director, Center for Neurologic Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital
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A remarkable rise in life expectancy during the last century has made Alzheimer's disease (AD) the most common form of cognitive failure in humans. Patients with AD lose their most human qualities: reasoning, abstraction, language and memory. Analyses of the brain changes that Dr. Alzheimer first described have guided the search for the underlying causes of AD. Recent discoveries implicating certain genes have led to the development of ways to possibly treat or prevent AD. Dr. Selkoe's presentation will trace the history of research into AD and explore how such discoveries may improve outcomes for patients.


Building a Magnetic Culture, How to Attract, Engage, and Retain Top Talent

Kevin A. Sheridan (MBA 1988), Chief Engagement Officer, Kevin Sheridan LLC
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To become the best in the business, it is essential to employ the best people. But how do employers build a staff that is ready and able to take an organization to its next level? To reach a high level of success, organizations must build a Magnetic Culture. Through this New York Times Best Seller book, Mr. Sheridan describes how to attract talented employees to the workplace, empower them, and sustain an environment in which they are more likely to stay. He also discusses the power of creating a culture of Employee Engagement by sharing the responsibility for personal Engagement between employees and management. Several 1988 HBS Classmates and their best practices are featured in the Best Seller and will be highlighted during this presentation, including leading executives from Starwood Hotels, Hospira, and Africa.com.

Related Resources:
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides


Next Generation Program: Personal Finance Workshop for Teens (for Ages 13+)

Rick Waechter (MBA 1988), Founder, Old Peak Finance, a wealth management firm
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In this session, Rick Waechter will introduce personal finance concepts to teenagers through "mini" cases. Students will form small teams to solve cases; intent is to maximize interest and encourage hands-on learning. Subjects: Budgeting, credit cards, saving and investing. Rick Waechter is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™. He has over 20 years' experience providing financial advice and has taught this course to over 500 teens.


Startup Showcase

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As part of our spring reunion programming, we are piloting this exciting program featuring alumni from the 5th, 10th, 15th, and 20th Reunions. The goal of the program is to showcase and support reunion attendees in the process of building new business ventures while creating entrepreneurial spirit within the HBS alumni community. For this event, a startup is considered a company or partnership designed to create a repeatable and scalable business model. These companies, generally newly created within 5 years, are in a phase of development and research for markets. Each start-up gives a 60-second pitch on basic concept, funding to date, potential application/market, and what they need. Following the pitches is networking and follow-up discussion.

Related Resources:
Spring 2013 Program Booklet
Spring 2013 Presentation Slides


PANEL: The 2013 & 2014 Outlook on the Markets — Key Drivers of Value Creation and Destruction

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Is the tumult really over? Where do markets go from here? Who is making smart bets—and where are the land mines hiding? Financial professionals, policy analysts, global operations experts and others discuss what comes next—and who will likely win and lose.

Charles Duhigg, MBA 2003 (moderator)
Investigative Reporter and 2013 Pulitzer Prize winner
The New York Times Company

John Duncan, MBA 1998
Principal
Meridian Research Group
former Senior Advisor to the Speaker of the U.S .House of Representatives

Gaurav Grover, MBA 2003
Head of Asian Equities/Portfolio Manager
Moore Capital

Yasemin Arik Monappa, MBA 2008
Principal
Apax Partners

Ruben Sigala, MBA 2003
Senior Vice President and Chief Analytics Officer
Caesars Entertainment Corporation


PANEL: Aging Parents — Navigating the Journey Successfully

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Are you responsible for aging parents and other loved ones while juggling the demands of your professional career? A panel of alumni and aging experts discuss specific strategies and resources for navigating your parents' later years successfully. Learn how to address the legal, financial, medical, and caregiving challenges while enjoying the benefits of multi-generational families. Each participant receives a copy of Don't Give Up on Me! Supporting Aging Parents Successfully, Janet's highly acclaimed guide through the unpredictable last years of her journey with her own parents. This book has become a must read for adult children who find suddenly, just when life is on overload, that their parents need help.

Janet Simpson Benvenuti, MBA 1985 (moderator)
Founder and CEO
Circle of Life Partners

Dr. Ajay Ahuja, MBA 2003
Vice President
Takeda Pharmaceuticals

Kristen Badgley, MBA 1998
Managing Director
Albertini Group

Hal Barge, MBA 1993
Director
Deep Submergence Systems


PANEL: Buying a Company — The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

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Graham P. Weihmiller, MBA 2003 (moderator)
Chairman
Griswold International

Matthew D. Estep, MBA 2008
Managing Partner and Founder
Bosworth Capital Partners

Arash Farin, MBA 2003
Vice President
Sage Group

Jan C. Reinhart, MBA 1998
Investment Officer
Swisscom AG

Doren Spinner, MBA 2003
Chairman and CEO
Norfil

Jon H. Troen, MBA 2003
President
Colorfx/Rock Communications


PANEL: Entrepreneurial Ventures — Best Practices for Developing a Viable Concept, Securing Capital, Forming the Organization, and Managing the Stages from Start-Up Onward

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Andrew R. Wilson, MBA 1993 (moderator)
Founder and CEO
Rexter Inc.

Vinay K. Bhagat, MBA 1998
Founder and CEO
TrustRadius

Walter I. Delph III, MBA 2003
CEO
Adly

Sarah M. Kauss, MBA 2003
Founder and CEO
S'WELL Bottle

Victoria K. Ransom, MBA 2008
Founder and CEO
Wildfire


PANEL: Getting Onto Boards

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Julie Cohen Norris, MBA 1993 (moderator)
Senior Client Partner
Korn/Ferry International

Arnaud Ajdler, MBA 2003
Managing Member
Engine Capital Management

Sherry L. Coutu, MBA 1993
Chairman
Porpoise Ventures
Entrepreneur, Investor and Non-Executive Director

David A. Janke, MBA 2003
Managing Partner
BlackSwan Partners

Laura B. Rippy, MBA 1993
Chairman of the Board
Zmags


PANEL: Hedge Fund

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Robert Steven Kaplan (moderator)
Martin Marshall Professor of Management Practice in Business Administration; Senior Associate Dean for External Relations
Harvard Business School

Aaron A. Bendikson, MBA 2003
Managing Director
Oaktree Capital Management

Adam Checchi, MBA 2003
Managing Partner
Checchi Capital Advisers

Robert Howard, MBA 1998
Member and Head of KKR Equity Strategies
Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co.


PANEL: Impact Investing

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V. Kasturi Rangan (moderator)
Malcolm P. McNair Professor of Marketing
Harvard Business School

Lisa Hall, MBA 1993
Director of Lending
Calvert Foundation

Fran Seegull, MBA 1998
Chief Investment Officer and Managing Director
ImpactAssets

Lisa Skeete Tatum, MBA 1998
Independent Investor and Board Member


PANEL: Nonprofits — Trends and How to Get Involved

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Christine R. Chin, MBA 1998 (moderator)
Managing Director
Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation

Jennifer W. Aronson, MBA 2003
Senior Director
The Boston Foundation

William C. Morrison, MBA 1998
Cochair
HBSAB Community Action Partners Program

Arden O'Connor, MBA 2008
Founder and CEO
O'Connor Professional Group

Andrew F. Popell, MBA 1993
Chief Business Officer
StratoSolar, Inc.


PANEL: Wealth Management and Estate Planning

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Susanna K. Bracke, MBA 1993 (moderator)
Senior Vice President
UBS Financial Services

Jennifer Dowling Dougherty, MBA 1998
Principal, Wealth Manager
US Boston Capital

Allan A. Gubbins, MBA 2008
Vice President
Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.

Pamela N. Perskie, MBA 2003
Director, Wealth Management
BBR Partners


PANEL: Work-Life Balance — Is it a Misnomer, or is it Actually Possible?

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Wesley M. Brandon, MBA 2003 (moderator)
Vice President of Marketing
NuFACE

Susan Hamilton, MBA 1998
Principal
sh.BRAND

Mia F. Mends, MBA 2003
Vice President of Sales, Americas
Sodexo

Lilijan Sulejmanovic, MBA 2008
CEO
Osvit

Philip L. Terry, MBA 1998
CEO
Creative Good


PANEL: How to Stay Ahead in the Smart World of Technology

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Moderator: Igor Vezmar, (GMP 7 2009)
Principal & COO
Pepé Digital, LLC

Christopher Calisi, (TGMP 3 1998)
CEO
Fair Winds Software

Alec L. Ellison, (MBA 1988)
Vice Chairman
Jefferie

Fred A. Rogers, (MBA 1983)
President
Crucial Trends


PANEL: Gifting and Personal Finance

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Moderator: Rick Waechter, (MBA 1988)
Founder
Old Peak Finance

Jim Carroll, (MBA 1983)
Managing Partner
LongRun Capital Management

Steven M. Carter, (MBA 1978)
Financial Advisor
Northwestern Mutual

Steven D. Schaumberger, (MBA 1988)
Senior Director
NFP

Andrea Spatz, (MBA 1983)
Certified Financial Planner
Wallensky Spatz & Associates


PANEL: Joining & Serving on Boards

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Moderator: Gary J. Yarus, (MBA 1978)
Investor and Advisor; President & Founder
Diversified Capital Corporation

Alison Davis, (MBA 1988)
Managing Partner
Fifth Era
Board Director
Royal Bank of Scotland, Unisys, Diamond Foods, Zoom and Gamefly

Lawrence K. Fish, (MBA 1968)
Former Chairman & CEO
Citizens Financial Group, Inc.

Alnoor Kara, (GMP 6 2009)
Executive Coach & Non-Executive Director

Bing Shen (MBA 1973)
Supervisor and Chairman, Audit Committee
CTCI Corporation
Independent Director and Chairman, Compensation Committee
Far Eastern New Century Corporation


Nitin Nohria, George F. Baker Professor of Business Administration and
Dean of the Faculty

Welcome: Robert Steven Kaplan (MBA 1983), Martin Marshall Professor of Management Practice in Business Administration, Senior Associate Dean, External Relations, and Chair, HBS Campaign Planning

Speaker: Nitin Nohria, George F. Baker Professor of Business Administration, and Dean of the Faculty

Mallory Stark, Curriculum and Learning Services

HBS alumni have access to the world's largest business management education information base. From career to professional research needs, learn how you can bring the world of information to your fingertips. Knowledge and Library Services will provide an overview on how to leverage their expertise for job and career research, exploring trends and ideas, investigation new markets, and starting and growing a business.

Related Resources:
Fall 2013 Presentation Slides (pdf)

Cynthia Churchwell, Curriculum and Learning Services

Did you know that alumni privileges at HBS include access to the world-class resources at Baker Library for your career and professional research needs? A representative of Knowledge and Library Services provides an overview of these services available for job and career research, exploring trends and ideas, investigating new markets, starting and growing a business, and digging deeper into the subjects covered in the reunion panel discussions.

Related Resources:
Spring 2013 Presentation Slides (pdf)