Dean Nitin Nohria

Dean Nohria's welcome remarks to alumni for an update on HBS today. Welcoming remarks by Robert S. Kaplan (MBA 1983), Senior Associate Dean for External Relations and Chair, HBS Campaign Planning

Baker Library Services for Alumni

Mallory Stark and Jen Beauregard, Curriculum and Learning Services

Emilie Codega, Information Research Specialist, Harvard Business School

Did you know that alumni privileges at HBS include access to the world-class resources at Baker Library for your career and professional research needs? Knowledge and Library Services will provide an overview of these services available for job and career research, exploring trends and ideas, investigating new markets, starting and growing a business.

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Spring 2012 Presentation Slides

Impacting Global Health: Harnessing Human Nature to Design Better Programs and Products

Nava Ashraf, Associate Professor and MBA Class of 1966 Faculty Research Fellow
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Each year there are more than 13 million deaths from health conditions for which there exist safe, effective, and affordable prevention and treatment methods. Billions of dollars have been invested in global health, yet the gap between the existence of health technologies and their consistent use by consumers persists. This presentation addresses this critical usage gap through renewed focus on the "end user," a role traditionally defined as the donor organization funding the intervention, which Ms. Ashraf instead identifies as the consumers and providers of health care. Progress toward ending the usage gap requires a deep knowledge of the decision-making processes of these actors. Ashraf's presentation will describe findings from her field experiments in Lusaka, Zambia, which give insight into the true co-producers of global health.

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Fall 2012 Presentation Slides


The Quiet Leader—And How to Be One

Joseph L. Badaracco, John Shad Professor of Business Ethics
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Think of a business leader and who comes to mind? A bold type like Jack Welch or Steve Jobs? But real leaders solve tough problems in all kinds of ways, and often quietly. Quiet leaders—managers who apply modesty, restraint, and tenacity to solve particularly difficult problems—are more common than we think, says Professor Badaracco. In this talk, he will describe what quiet leaders do and how they make the workplace, and the world, better.

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Fall 2012 Presentation Slides


Bounded Ethicality

Max H. Bazerman, Jesse Isidor Straus Professor of Business Administration
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This talk is not about intentional unethical action, entailing the conscious deliberations between right and wrong that are the focus of most treatments of ethics. Rather, bounded ethicality describes the systematic and predictable psychological processes that lead people to engage in ethically questionable behaviors that are inconsistent with their own preferred ethics. This perspective explains how an executive can make a decision that not only harms others, but is also inconsistent with his or her conscious beliefs and preferences.


Designing Controls for Empowerment

Dennis Campbell, Associate Professor of Business Administration
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Organizations in a variety of service and retail contexts are characterized by distributed operations exposed to highly variable customer behavior. Control systems in these contexts must not only motivate current performance but also need to motivate employees to learn about, anticipate, and adapt to customers with heterogeneous demands, preferences, and expectations. Complicating things further, the output resulting from customer service experiences is often intangible and difficult to define in terms of both quantity and quality leading to significant challenges in performance measurement and the provision of incentives for customer-facing employees.

This presentation will discuss empirical research exploring how control system choices made at the organizational level influence, and are influenced by, the organization's customer-facing operations. In particular, I will discuss archival, field, and case-based research documenting how choices related to performance measures, incentives, empowerment, and monitoring are made in response to the complexity of an organization's customer facing operations, how these choices affect the quality of local decision-making, and the extent to which various choices on these dimensions trade off current performance benefits for employee learning.

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Fall 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


How Will You Measure Your Life?

Clayton M. Christensen, Kim B. Clark Professor of Business Administration
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Professor Christensen tackles the question of how to live a happy, meaningful, purpose-filled life. Even before his stroke and cancer diagnosis, Christensen routinely questioned his students not just about their career ambitions but about what they hoped for in their lives. He extends that conversation here, distilling lessons learned from studying businesses over the course of his academic career and spinning them into deeply personal wisdom. He draws on examples from companies such as Intel, Disney, and Iridium to illustrate how to align actions, time, and resources with priorities; manage relationships; and even improve parenting. He interweaves personal stories into these lessons, including his early, never realized desire to be the editor of the Wall Street Journal; being fired from a CEO job; his passion for teaching; and his own parenting experiences.

Fall 2012 Presentation Slides


Principles of Management That We Teach That Are Not Always True

Clayton M. Christensen, Kim B. Clark Professor of Business Administration
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Historically, innovation has seemed to be expensive and risky. Our research has shown, however, that the root cause of the spotty results is often the principles of "good management" that are taught at HBS and elsewhere. In this session, we'll describe which of the principles we teach are the greatest culprits in causing innovations to fail.

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Fall 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


How to Decode Insider Trading

Lauren H. Cohen, Associate Professor of Business Administration and Marvin Bower Fellow
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This presentation will discuss a new technique for decoding the information in insider trades. Exploiting the fact that insiders trade for a variety of reasons, we'll show that there is predictable, identifiable "routine" insider trading that is not informative for the future of firms. Stripping away these routine trades, which comprise over half of all insider trades, leaves a set of information-rich "opportunistic" trades that contain all the predictive power in the insider trading universe. A portfolio strategy that focuses solely on opportunistic insider trades yields value-weight abnormal returns of 82 basis points a month, while the abnormal returns associated with routine traders are essentially zero. Further, opportunistic trades predict future news and events at a firm level, while routine trades do not.


How to Boost Your Power through Body Language

Amy J. C. Cuddy, Associate Professor of Business Administration
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Our judgments of others—and their judgments of us—are largely based on nonverbal cues, such as how we stand, move, and smile. By making simple adjustments to our own nonverbal behaviors, we change how powerful we feel and how powerful we appear to others. Recent behavioral science breakthroughs reveal how body language affects our hormone levels, thoughts, feelings, behaviors, and interactions. This session focuses on how we can embody power through minimal adjustments that lead to high impact outcomes.


Managing the Impact of Wealth on Families

John A. Davis, Senior Lecturer of Business Administration
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Wealth and the motivation to create wealth is a predominant force in society, and yet there has been little formal study of the creation of wealth or its impact on the families who possess it. Professor Davis will discuss the major issues that wealth presents to a family and how families successfully manage both the opportunities and challenges created by wealth.

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Fall 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


Google and Facebook

John A. Deighton, Harold M. Brierley Professor of Business Administration
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Ford and the Model T changed the physical world. The internet is changing our mental world. First there was Google, which put a dent in world ignorance, and later Facebook, which did the same for global loneliness. Do these virtues come at a cost? They alter the line between private life and life in the marketplace; they change the balance of information between buyers and sellers; they turn word-of-mouth from a one-to-one sharing activity to one-to-many broadcasting. And as Google enters Facebook's domain with Google+, what will happen to the balance of information-age power?

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Fall 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


Why Smart People Won't Change

Thomas J. DeLong, Philip J. Stomberg Professor of Management Practice
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Many people with a high need for achievement find the process of individual change very difficult. Some professionals resign themselves to organizational, personal, and life situations that are miserable or where they feel caught. Professor DeLong will discuss individual motivation and how to leverage the opportunities that confront us in our professional and private lives. The presentation is based on DeLong's book, Flying Without A Net: Turn Fear of Change Into Fuel for Success.

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Fall 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


The Incentive Bubble

Mihir A. Desai, Mizuho Financial Group Professor of Finance and Senior Associate Dean for Planning and University Affairs
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As a faculty contributor to the HBS project on US Competitiveness, Professor Desai examined the changing nature of incentives for managers and investors. He traced the twin crises of modern American capitalism—repeated governance crises and rising income inequality—to the proliferation of incentive contracts for investors and managers that outsource evaluation and compensation to financial markets. These contracts have an intuitive appeal but, as implemented, they have led to skewed incentives, windfalls and misallocations of financial, real and human capital. Professor Desai will discuss various steps toward popping this financial incentive bubble (FIB).

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Spring 2012 Presentation Slides
US Competitiveness Project webpage


Why You Aren't Buying Venezuelan Chocolate

Rohit Deshpandé, Sebastian S. Kresge Professor of Marketing
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As a faculty contributor to the HBS project on US Competitiveness, Professor Desai examined the changing nature of incentives for managers and investors. He traced the twin crises of modern American capitalism—repeated governance crises and rising income inequality—to the proliferation of incentive contracts for investors and managers that outsource evaluation and compensation to financial markets. These contracts have an intuitive appeal but, as implemented, they have led to skewed incentives, windfalls and misallocations of financial, real and human capital. Professor Desai will discuss various steps toward popping this financial incentive bubble (FIB).

The next wave of global challengers will be firms from emergent market countries like Brazil, China, and India. Who are these companies, and what are the barriers they are trying to overcome? Professor Deshpandé will report on his research on the Provenance Paradox in global branding where companies try to be authentic to their national origins yet cannot command a "first country" price. What can companies in BRIC countries learn from their Japanese and Korean counterparts about competing against American and European firms for the hearts and minds of customers worldwide? And what can the latter firms do about the new emergent market global competitors?

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Fall 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


Building a Performance-Driven Social Sector

Alnoor Ebrahim, Associate Professor of Business Administration
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How can social sector organizations—such as social enterprises, nonprofits, and foundations—better measure their performance in order to drive social change? Should they measure short-term results that they can control, or aim for long-term results under conditions of limited control? Professor Ebrahim will discuss his research on innovative organizations that are attempting to crack this problem, and he will lead a conversation about the future of this field.


Google and Facebook

Benjamin G. Edelman, Associate Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

Ford and the Model T changed the physical world. The internet is changing our mental world. First there was Google, which put a dent in world ignorance, and later Facebook, which did the same for global loneliness. Do these virtues come at a cost? They alter the line between private life and life in the marketplace; they change the balance of information between buyers and sellers; they turn word-of-mouth from a one-to-one sharing activity to one-to-many broadcasting. And as Google enters Facebook's domain with Google+, what will happen to the balance of information-age power?

Related Resources:
Fall 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


The Lean Startup

Thomas R. Eisenmann, Howard H. Stevenson Professor of Business Administration and Chair, MBA Elective Curriculum
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Entrepreneurs who follow the "lean startup" approach strive to avoid wasting time and money. As quickly as possible, they launch a "minimum viable product" (MVP) with the smallest feature set necessary to rigorously test hypotheses about their opportunity, based on feedback from early adopters. They rapidly iterate this MVP based on a succession of tests, and pivot to a new product design, market segment, or business model when hypotheses are disproved. Professor Eisenmann will describe how lean startup principles are being taught in the required first-year MBA course, The Entrepreneurial Manager, and applied in the new FIELD course, which requires all first-year students to launch a new venture. He also will discuss the MVP Fund, a competition through which HBS this year made $5,000 grants to about 20 MBA startups based on the quality and potential impact of MVP tests they proposed.

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Fall 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


Blockbuster Strategies: Will Creative Industries Survive the Rise of Digital Technology?

Anita Elberse, Associate Professor of Business Administration
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The emergence of digital technology is having a profound impact on the media and entertainment industries and is putting pressure on existing business models. Drawing on empirical research involving large data sets as well as in depth case studies of companies in this space, Professor Elberse will offer insights into consumer behavior in digital channels and the likely consequences for managers. The central question is whether popular "blockbuster strategies" remain viable in the digital age. The session will focus on issues such as the possibilities for monetizing the "long tail" of media content, the consequences of the unbundling of content, and the new rules of promoting content online.


The Culture and Community Initiative: Reflections on HBS's Student Culture

Robin J. Ely, Warren Alpert Professor of Business Administration and Senior Associate Dean for Culture and Community
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The Culture and Community Initiative (CCI) advances inclusion, one of the School's five priorities. The CCI builds on a long history of efforts at HBS to advance this goal; it is designed to cultivate a culture that enables all members of our community—faculty, staff, and students—to thrive and realize their full potential for advancing HBS's mission of educating leaders who make a difference in the world. To ground the CCI in a thorough understanding of our culture, we are undertaking a series of self-assessment projects, one focused on MBA Program students, a second on faculty, a third on staff, and a fourth on alumni/ae. This session will provide an overview of the CCI, with a focus on the Student Culture Project, a comprehensive, rigorous investigation into the nature of students' experience at HBS. This project provides the basis for faculty and students to engage together in ongoing, constructive dialogue on matters pertaining to our student culture with the goal of increasing accountability and undertaking change in a thoughtful and sustained manner.


Authentic Leadership Development

William W. George, Professor of Management Practice
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Professor George will lead a discussion on ways leadership is changing in the 21st century and how leaders are adapting to demands on themselves in the environment and from their workforce. The discussion will be built on authentic leadership, through which leaders align their organizations around mission and values, empower people at all levels to step up and lead, focus on service to all their stakeholders, and create highly collaborative environments to sustain superior performance. Finally, the discussion will focus on how HBS is changing to develop "leaders that make a difference in the world," including the use of six-person leadership development groups to provide confidential, intimate support groups.

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Fall 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


Sidetracked: Why Our Decisions Get Derailed, and How We Can Stick to the Plan

Francesca Gino, Associate Professor of Business Administration
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Ms. Gino has long studied the factors at play when judgment and decision-making collide with the results of our choices in real life. She will explore how inconsistent decisions play out in a wide range of circumstances—from our roles as consumers and employees (what we buy, how we manage others) to the choices that we make more broadly as human beings (who we date, how we deal with friendships). Learn when a mismatch is most likely to occur between what you want and what you end up doing. Learn what you can do to correct for the subtle influences that derail decisions to better understand the nuances of your decisions and how they get derailed—so you have more control over keeping them on track.


Is Japan Headed towards the Same Fate as Greece?

Robin Greenwood, Associate Professor of Business Administration
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Professor Greenwood will discuss the case "Hayman Capital Management" about investor Kyle Bass's position on Japan. Japan has the world's highest debt burden, whether expressed as a percentage of GDP or government revenue. Guided by recent global events, Professor Greenwood will lead a discussion about whether the country will have the same fate as Greece, or alternatively whether a smooth landing is in store, as well as the broader role that investors have played in recent global economic fluctuations.


Building and Sustaining High-Performing Nonprofit Organizations

Allen S. Grossman, MBA Class of 1957 Professor of Management Practice
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In a time of shrinking resources, donors and board members are demanding higher levels of performance from nonprofit organizations. More than ever before, these stakeholders expect demonstrable results for their investments of time and money. However, high performance in the nonprofit sector is often elusive—hard to define and difficult to achieve. Key to the challenge is that the numerous barriers to nonprofit high performance are often different from those in the for-profit sector. This session will analyze some of the barriers to high performance and discuss a new framework to address them.

Fall 2012 Presentation Slides


Driving Growth in Turbulent Markets

Ranjay Gulati, Jaime and Josefina Chua Tiampo Professor of Business Administration and Unit Head, Organizational Behavior and Chair, Advanced Management Program
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In a presentation based on his new book, Reorganize for Resilience, Professor Gulati reveals how "resilient" companies—those that prosper in turbulent markets—are driving growth and increasing profitability by immersing themselves in the lives of their customers. By reorienting their organizations to be proactive, flexible, and truly customer-centric, these pioneering companies have driven growth in difficult times.

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Fall 2012 Presentation Slides


Digital Strategy

Sunil Gupta, Edward W. Carter Professor of Business Administration and Unit Head, Marketing
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Digital media and, in particular, social media like YouTube, Facebook, blogs, and Twitter represent radically new tools for reaching and collaborating with customers. This presentation will discuss the trends in new media and a framework for formulating digital strategy.

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Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


Sustainable Capitalism: An Oxymoron?

Rebecca M. Henderson, John and Natty McArthur University Professor
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The world's population has doubled in my lifetime and tripled in my fathers. Our growing numbers are placing increasing pressure on many of the earth's resources, but particularly on land and water, while our accelerating economic growth is simultaneously accelerating our emissions of greenhouse gases, so that we now run a serious risk of destabilizing the earth's climate. Business is often identified as the source of many of these problems, but business is also the source of the freedom, prosperity and opportunity that is so central to meeting humanity's needs. In this talk I will explore both the risks and the tremendous opportunities inherent in harnessing the power of private enterprise to build a more sustainable world, and explore how we can hold the tension between the demands of the bottom line and our desire to make a difference in the world.


Healthcare, What's Next?

Regina E. Herzlinger, Nancy R. McPherson Professor of Business Administration
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Professor Herzlinger will discuss the impact of the healthcare reform legislation on the US healthcare system and economy.


Competing Through Culture

James L. Heskett, UPS Foundation Professor of Business Logistics, Emeritus
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The impact of culture on competitive performance is measurable and can be remarkable. Organization cultures develop with or without intervention. Leaders and managers can't stop the process, so the most successful shape it. This session, based on Jim Heskett's latest book, The Culture Cycle, focuses on successes and failures in the development of cultures that deliver competitive advantage. Based on 20 years of field research, he will discuss how cultures are formed, measured, managed, and changed; why great cultures are vulnerable; and how the effectiveness of the very best is preserved.

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Fall 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


Where Will We Find Tomorrow's Leaders?

Linda A. Hill, Wallace Brett Donham Professor of Business Administration
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What kind of leadership do world-class organizations need? Professor Hill will discuss the three imperatives of leading in today's dynamic global economy.


Healthcare's Humpty Dumpty Challenge: Specialization in the Era of Accountable Care

Robert S. Huckman, Professor of Business Administration
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The American healthcare system is becoming increasingly specialized. Proponents of this trend tout the benefits of simplicity, standardization, and greater expertise. At the same time, critics fear that increased specialization will exacerbate the problem of fragmentation in healthcare delivery. To address this concern, recent federal legislation—most notably, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and the Affordable Care Act of 2010—contains provisions aimed at improving the coordination of care delivered by specialized providers. This session will consider how the tension between specialization and coordination can be managed to improve quality and control cost growth in healthcare delivery.


Beauty Imagined

Geoffrey G. Jones, Isidor Straus Professor of Business History
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This talk will discuss highlights from Professor Jones's book on the global beauty industry from the 19th century to the present day. He explores how successive generations of entrepreneurs built brands that shaped perceptions of beauty worldwide. They democratized access to beauty products, once the privilege of elites, but they also defined the gender and ethnic borders of beauty and its association with a handful of cities, notably Paris and, later, New York. Today, globalization is changing the beauty industry again. Global brands have swept into China, Russia, and India, but at the same time, these brands are responding to a far greater diversity of cultures and lifestyles as new markets are opened up worldwide.

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Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


How to Solve the Cost Crisis in Healthcare

Robert S. (Bob) Kaplan, Marvin Bower Professor of Leadership Development, Emeritus
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In their September 2011 paper published in Harvard Business Review, Professors Kaplan and Michael E. Porter describe a fundamental problem in healthcare: providers do not understand their costs for delivering healthcare to patients nor how to relate costs to outcomes. Kaplan and Porter demonstrate how time-driven, activity-based costing provides accurate and transparent costing at the individual patient level. The approach promises to transform the economics of the health care industry by facilitating major improvements in process efficiencies, resource deployment and utilization, and sustainable cost reductions without compromising patient outcomes. It will accelerate the introduction of innovative reimbursement approaches that reward providers for delivering the best outcomes at the lowest cost, not those that perform multiple and expensive procedures. The new approach "is the previously hidden secret for solving the health care cost crisis."


Every Child, Every Classroom: Innovations to Achieve Better Student Outcomes in Public Education

Robert Steven Kaplan, Professor of Management Practice; Senior Associate Dean, External Relations and Chair, HBS Campaign Planning
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We know the problem: high drop-out rates in our nation's largest cities, persistent achievement gaps, and low international rankings on standardized tests. Education is front and center in national debates about the future of the country. This attention, coupled with unprecedented investments, both private and public, has created a window of opportunity for action. At the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE), the belief is that education is not an intractable problem, and that higher education has a critical role to play in bringing good ideas to scale. Robert Steven Kaplan, Professor of Management Practice and Senior Associate Dean, External Relations will interview Kathleen McCartney, Dean, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

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Fall 2012 Presentation Slides


What to Ask the Person in the Mirror: Critical Questions for Becoming a More Effective Leader and Reaching Your Potential

Robert Steven Kaplan, Professor of Management Practice; Senior Associate Dean, External Relations and Chair, HBS Campaign Planning
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It sometimes seems as though the best leaders are naturally blessed with a knack for having the right answers. These executives appear to have been born with superb instincts, natural charisma, great insight, excellent organizational skills, and an ability to inspire others. They also appear very sure of themselves, as though leading and managing comes quite easily to them. The reality is far more complicated. The truth is that successful leaders, no matter how talented, go through periods of confusion and uncertainty—even, on occasion, grasping for answers and feeling fundamentally alone and apprehensive. A key difference between those who reach their potential and those who do not is how they deal with these periods of struggle. Professor Kaplan discusses how the challenge lies not in avoiding these difficult periods, but in knowing how to step back and ask the right questions—questions that help you gain insight, diagnose problems, regroup, and move forward.

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Fall 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


Managing Urban School Districts for High Performance

John Jong-Hyun Kim, Senior Lecturer of Business Administration
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Nearly 14,000 public school districts operate in the United States, spending about $600 billion annually. There are more students enrolled in public schools today—nearly 50 million—than at any point in the history of the United States. The 100 largest districts serve about 22% of total students and 35% of the nation's minority students. While pockets of high performance exist in these large systems, excellence at scale remains an elusive goal in education. The costs of inconsistent quality of schooling—particularly for minority students—are tremendous, amounting to nearly a trillion dollars a year in GDP. Even with existing political and governance constraints, districts could perform considerably better. A key element in realizing this potential is improved leadership and management. However, there are few sources of specialized management knowledge for the public education sector. While much of the existing business knowledge is germane to public school districts, little has been adapted to accommodate the unique and complex environment in which public schools function. The Public Education Leadership Project (PELP), a joint HBS-HGSE project, was established in January 2004 to address this gap in management knowledge and build leadership capacity in urban schools districts.


The Visible Hand in China: Entrepreneurs, Entrepreneurship, and the Role of the State

Elisabeth Köll, Associate Professor of Business Administration
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The nature of entrepreneurship in China, in particular the relationship between private entrepreneurs and the government, reflects the constantly changing economic and political dynamics. Considering the strong return of state capitalism in China since 2008, the serious domestic challenges to socio-economic stability and simultaneous pursuit of strong economic growth at home and in the global market, private entrepreneurship remains crucial for improving economic development and the business environment. What role do private entrepreneurs play in a vibrant economy characterized by state capitalism? We will explore the historical legacies of China's new entrepreneurial class, the transformation of entrepreneurs and their companies under changing political frameworks, and what this means for our assessment of private companies, state-owned enterprises, and hybrid models in China's economy today. Professor Koll will address the opportunities and challenges for entrepreneurial activities as well as the resulting implications for foreign companies with business interests in China.


Contests and Communities: New Ways to Drive Innovation from Unexpected Sources

Karim R. Lakhani, Assistant Professor of Business Administration
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Innovation has become an urgent imperative for entrepreneurial and established organizations. Over the last decade, in industries as diverse as fashion design, media software, life sciences, pharmaceuticals and automotive, the most cutting edge organizations have started to externalize their innovation process by working actively with communities and sponsoring contests. TOM Professor Karim R. Lakhani, Principal Investigator for the Harvard—NASA Tournament Labs, will provide best practice examples and a framework for using communities and contests to solve the most pressing innovation problems.

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Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


European Debt Crisis

Rajiv Lal, Stanley Roth Sr. Professor of Retailing; Dante Roscini, Senior Lecturer and L. E. Simmons Faculty Fellow
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Moderated by Professor Lal, the panel will include: Giorgos Papakonstantinou, finance minister of Greece at the inception of the Greek crisis, who negotiated the first loan package with the European Union, the International Monetary Fund, and the European Central Bank (ECB); Senior Lecturer Dante Roscini, a senior bank executive for more than twenty years and author of the current HBS cases on Greece and the European crisis; and Professor Luis M. Viceira from the Finance Unit, advisor to large intitutional investors and consultant to central banks, including the ECB. This session will explore the causes of the crisis, potential scenarios for its unfolding, possible policy response to it, and how institutions such as the German and other European governments, the ECB, and the Bundesbank could affect its course. The panel will consider what impact the crisis is likely to have on different sectors of the economy and what steps businesses might take to protect themselves.


The Greatly Exaggerated Death of Financial Incentives

Ian Larkin, Assistant Professor of Business Administration
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In recent years, financial incentives have been roundly criticized by academics and business practitioners, faulted for leading to fraud, stifling creativity, and everything in between. How should executives think about financial incentives in the day of (to quote best-selling author Dan Pink) employee "autonomy, mastery, and purpose?" Larkin's research suggests that some form of "pay-for-performance" can and should play a role in the compensation of most employees. Financial and non-financial incentives are tools to be used in the right situations; abandoning financial incentives altogether is a mistake. Larkin will discuss how managers can use all the motivational tools at their disposal—financial incentives, other extrinsic motivators such as peer recognition, purely intrinsic motivators, and even influence techniques not explicitly focused on motivation—to best stimulate value-creating behavior by employees.

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Fall 2012 Presentation Slides


Doctors are Human, Too: Biases in Physician Decision Making and the Impact on the Health Care System

Ian Larkin, Assistant Professor of Business Administration
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Physicians play a critical role in choosing treatments for patients, which directly affects not only patient health but also health care system costs and the profitability of many companies throughout the value chain. Recent research suggests that when making patient care decisions, physicians are susceptible to many of the same biases and subtle psychological influences as other corporate decision makers. This session will review this research and discuss implications for the health care system, pharmaceutical and insurance companies, and patients.


Harvard i-Lab Presentation & Tour

Joseph B. Lassiter, Senator John Heinz Professor of Management Practice in Environmental Management
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Newly opened in November 2011, the Innovation Lab—or i-lab—is designed to foster team-based and entrepreneurial activities and to deepen interactions among students, faculty, entrepreneurs, and the Boston community. The lab provides public areas and meeting rooms designed to foster project work, as well as business development resources for companies, nonprofits, entrepreneurs, and other individuals in the Allston-Brighton neighborhood and Boston area. This is a central place where students, practitioners, and local businesses can work together, share knowledge, and collaborate on ideas. Join us for a presentation, video, and tour of the Harvard Innovation Lab.

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Harvard innovation lab


Private Equity at a Crossroads: What's Next?

Josh Lerner, Jacob H. Schiff Professor of Investment Banking and Chair, OPM
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Both the buyout and venture-capital industries face unprecedented challenges today. After an orgy of investments in the mid-2000s, private-equity funds suffered a hangover of epic proportions. In recent quarters, however, the portfolios of the private equity funds have recovered in a manner that has surprised even the most optimistic observers. Meanwhile, venture capital, after a prolonged drought, shows signs of a surge in transactions, driven by social media firms. But all is not rosy: many of the investors on which these funds have traditionally depended, such as endowments and pensions, have deep problems, which is affecting the flow of capital to the sector. This talk will explore this unsettled and often mysterious territory and offer some surprising predictions about the future of these sectors.

Related Resources:
Fall 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides

Related HBS Programs:
Private Equity and Venture Capital


MBA Program: FIELD Update

Alan D. MacCormack, MBA Class of 1949 Adjunct Professor of Business Administration
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Faculty will describe the structure and goals of the new FIELD program, as well as provide insights into the student experience after its first year. In addition to Q&A, session participants will engage in a FIELD exercise.


Powerful Politicians: Earmarks, Social Connections, and Insider Trading

Christopher J. Malloy, Associate Professor of Business Administration and Marvin Bower Fellow
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This session will investigate links between US politicians and corporate America. It will explore the process by which powerful politicians use their power to obtain earmarks and increased government spending for their home states. It will show that this type of government spending has distortionary effects on private-sector economic activity, in the form of reduced investment and R&D by corporations. It will demonstrate that social connections among politicians, and between politicians and firms, have a significant impact on the voting behavior of legislators. Lastly, it will investigate recent claims that politicians may be trading on illegal insider information in their personal stock portfolios.

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Fall 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


Social Enterprise Governance—It Is Different

F. Warren McFarlan, Baker Foundation Professor and Albert H. Gordon Professor of Business Administration, Emeritus
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This session will be built off Professor McFarlan's new book, Joining a Nonprofit Board: What You Need to Know. These mission-driven organizations are very different in character from for-profit organizations. The role of board members, the importance of mission identification, measurement of mission performance, and the role of finances and philanthropy create a very different environment from the for-profit board. It is very easy for people from a for-profit background to make false steps in this environment that are difficult to recover from.

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Fall 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


Leading Strategy

Cynthia A. Montgomery, Timken Professor of Business Administration and Director of Research
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Which comes first: the strategy or the strategist? In the last 25 years strategy has striven to become a science. In the process, we've lost sight of its human dimension and what it takes to lead the effort. What does it mean to be responsible for strategy? What skill sets and mind sets are involved?.

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Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


When Leaders Make a Difference

Gautam Mukunda, Assistant Professor of Business Administration
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Mr. Mukunda will discuss how and when individual leaders really can make a difference. In his research, detailed in his new book, Indispensable: When Leaders Really Matter, he profiles a mix of historic and modern figures—from Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln to Winston Churchill and Judah Folkman—and examines stories of how they came to power and made the most important decisions of their lives. He then reveals how a single person can save or destroy the organization he or she leads, and even change the course of history. By analyzing the hidden patterns of their careers, and by exploring the systems that place these leaders in positions of power, Mukunda will shed new light on how we may be able to identify the best leaders.

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Fall 2012 Presentation Slides


Leveraging Service Excellence

Das Narayandas, James J. Hill Professor of Business Administration; Senior Associate Dean; and Director of HBS Publishing and Chair, Advanced Management Program
Less Info

Firms are increasingly looking towards service excellence to augment their core offerings and create sustainable differentiation that, in turn, increases customer retention and profitability. This cascading model (i.e, the Service Profit Chain) has been studied extensively over the years by various faculty here at HBS. In this talk, we will look at specific initiatives/actions that firms can implement to ensure/enhance the success of their service excellence strategies.


Reinventing the MBA: Action Learning and the New FIELD course at HBS

Felix Oberholzer-Gee, Andreas Andresen Professor of Business Administration; Senior Associate Dean for International Development
Less Info

Field Immersion Experience for Leadership Development (FIELD) is an innovative new First Year Required Course that helps students put theories into practice, working in small teams on intensive projects to solve real-world problems. Created to complement the school's traditional case-based method of pedagogy, FIELD provides a rigorous new platform for students to develop skills that focus on hands-on learning, teamwork, and self-awareness. In this session, Professor Oberholzer-Gee will describe the objectives of FIELD and how these are realized in a design that includes learning about effective leadership styles, engaging in a global immersion experience in one of twelve emerging markets, and taking a business idea from concept to fruition over the course of a single semester.


Investing in Real Assets

André F. Perold, George Gund Professor of Finance and Banking, Retired

Prospects for American Competitiveness

Gary P. Pisano, Harry E. Figgie, Jr. Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

The HBS project on US competitiveness is a multi-faculty effort to examine how firms in the United States can compete successfully in the global economy while raising the living standards of the average American. The project focuses especially on the roles that business leaders can play in improving the US business environment. In this session, Professor Jan Rivkin will give an overview of the project's progress, including the findings from a survey of nearly 10,000 HBS alumni, while Professor Gary Pisano will discuss his work on the future of manufacturing and innovation in America.

Related Resources:
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides—Pisano
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides—Rivkin Part 1
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides—Rivkin Part 2


Extreme Productivity: Boost Your Results, Reduce Your Hours

Robert C. Pozen, Senior Lecturer of Business Administration
Less Info

In this talk, Professor Pozen will share his practical suggestions on how to get more done at work from his new book on personal productivity. His key concept—focus on the results you achieve, not the hours you log. In specific, he will discuss how to: 1) set and prioritize goals, 2) establish a daily routine in the office and on the road, 3) read and write more effectively, 4) manage up and down the corporate ladder, and 5) improve decisions about career and work-life balance. This talk is for anyone feeling overwhelmed by their existing workload—facing many competing demands and multiple project deadlines.


Twenty-First Century Energy

Forest L. Reinhardt, John D. Black Professor
Less Info

The world of energy is in turmoil: technological innovations on the supply side, exploding demand from developing nations, shifts in the geopolitical landscape, and pressures on the natural environment seem to render much of what we thought we knew about the economics and politics of energy obsolete. But is this really true? How can we make sense of these seismic shifts? What will the energy industries of the future look like? Who will benefit from the changes, and who will suffer? Drawing on the fundamental ideas of strategy and leadership that we remember from our time at HBS, we will attempt some answers to these complicated questions.

Related HBS Programs:
Fall 2012 Presentation Slides


Prospects for US Competitiveness: A Conversation with A. G. Lafley

Jan W. Rivkin, Bruce V. Rauner Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

Join A. G. Lafley (MBA 1977), a former member of the President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness and the former CEO of Procter & Gamble, as he is interviewed by Jan Rivkin, co-chair of HBS's US Competitiveness Project. Lafley will share what he has learned from the recent work of the President's Council, and Rivkin will describe how the HBS project is progressing. Participants should come prepared to engage in a lively discussion of how the upcoming election might shape America's prospects.


Prospects for American Competitiveness

Jan W. Rivkin, Bruce V. Rauner Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

The HBS project on US competitiveness is a multi-faculty effort to examine how firms in the United States can compete successfully in the global economy while raising the living standards of the average American. The project focuses especially on the roles that business leaders can play in improving the US business environment. In this session, Professor Jan Rivkin will give an overview of the project's progress, including the findings from a survey of nearly 10,000 HBS alumni, while Professor Gary Pisano will discuss his work on the future of manufacturing and innovation in America.

Related Resources:
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides—Pisano
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides—Rivkin Part 1
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides—Rivkin Part 2


European Debt Crisis

Dante Roscini, Senior Lecturer and L. E. Simmons Faculty Fellow
Less Info

Moderated by Professor Lal, the panel will include: Giorgos Papakonstantinou, finance minister of Greece at the inception of the Greek crisis, who negotiated the first loan package with the European Union, the International Monetary Fund, and the European Central Bank (ECB); Senior Lecturer Dante Roscini, a senior bank executive for more than twenty years and author of the current HBS cases on Greece and the European crisis; and Professor Luis M. Viceira from the Finance Unit, advisor to large intitutional investors and consultant to central banks, including the ECB. This session will explore the causes of the crisis, potential scenarios for its unfolding, possible policy response to it, and how institutions such as the German and other European governments, the ECB, and the Bundesbank could affect its course. The panel will consider what impact the crisis is likely to have on different sectors of the economy and what steps businesses might take to protect themselves.


MBA Program: FIELD Update

Clayton S. Rose, Professor of Management Practice
Less Info

Faculty will describe the structure and goals of the new FIELD program, as well as provide insights into the student experience after its first year. In addition to Q&A, session participants will engage in a FIELD exercise.


The Market for Smaller Firms

Richard S. Ruback, Willard Prescott Smith Professor of Corporate Finance
Less Info

Smaller firms sell for substantially lower multiples than larger firms in similar businesses. These smaller firms—with transaction values below $10 million—typically sell for four times earnings before taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA), multiples that are half to a third as large as those for comparable larger companies.

The low multiples for smaller firms seem to provide enormous opportunities for potential buyers—simply purchasing a company at such a low multiple and applying a bit of leverage provides purchasers an opportunity to earn returns in excess of those available elsewhere. After all, even without leverage, buying at 4x provides an EBITDA yield of 25%. The magic of small firm investing is surely these low multiples.

The opportunities to investors in smaller firms have attracted a variety of buyers but the added attention has not (yet) led to upward pressure on the multiples. In this talk, Professor Ruback will offer some thoughts about the market for smaller firms and the dynamics that result in the low multiples for smaller firms.

Our analysis heavily relies on the dozens of interviews with participants in the marketplace for smaller firms that we completed in connection with our efforts to develop two new courses at the Harvard Business School that focus on smaller firms.

Related Resources:
Fall 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


How Do CEOs Spend Their Time? Findings from the Executive Time Use Project

Raffaella Sadun, Assistant Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

Where does all your time go? And where should all your time go? These are the core questions addressed by the Executive Time Use project, a research initiative launched by faculty at HBS, Columbia Business School, and the London School of Economics. Based on detailed time use information on hundreds of CEOs in the United States, Europe, and India, this project represents the first large-scale international analysis of CEO time use. This session will explore the initial findings emerging from this ongoing research, focusing in particular on the factors influencing how CEOs spend their time and the implications of these choices on firms' performance.

Related Resources:
Fall 2012 Presentation Slides


PANEL: Social Impact Investing

William A. Sahlman, Dimitri V. D'Arbeloff - MBA Class of 1955 Professor of Business Administration; Senior Associate Dean for External Relations
Less Info

Social impact investing is defined as investing for financial and social return. This is a rapidly growing sector and has the potential to harness private capital for social good. This panel discussion will offer insights into the challenges and opportunities of social impact investing. The panelists are William Foote, founder and CEO of Root Capital, and Richard Kiphart (MBA 1965), head of private client advisors and principal of William Blair and nonexecutive chairman Lime Energy and Ranir Corp. Foote and Kiphart are leading practitioners in the field. Professor Sahlman from the Entrepreneurship Unit will lead the panel.


Hard Assets in an Age of Uncertainty

Arthur I. Segel, Poorvu Family Professor of Management Practice
Less Info

A discussion of real estate, farmland, and gold investing during uncertain economic times.

Related Resources:
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


From 1970 to 2022: The Past as Prologue to Forecasting the Future

Benson P. Shapiro, Malcolm P. McNair Professor of Marketing, Emeritus
Less Info

This interactive, HBS-style discussion will explore what can we learn from changes in the past four decades that will help us better understand the next decade.

An hour of this participant-driven discussion will cover these five topics:

  • Changes in consumer buying behavior
  • Changes in competitive approaches
  • Changes in the nature of business opportunities
  • Changes in the nature of investment opportunities
  • Changes in business ethics

Discussion will then focus on what those past changes mean for the coming decade as they relate to the five topic areas. Participants should come preprared to suggest two major changes in each of the five topic areas.


Jump Start Your Profit Growth

Benson P. Shapiro, Malcolm P. McNair Professor of Marketing, Emeritus
Less Info

Your company has already cut costs and survived what, for most firms, has been a brutal economic time. Now to increase profits and enterprise value and ensure a strong market position, it is imperative that you grow your top-line revenue quickly and efficiently. You need to increase unit sales and/or prices on a tight budget and a fast schedule.

Related Resources:
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


Global Strategic Management

Jordan I. Siegel, Associate Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

Professor Siegel will share his research about how global multinational outcompete their local rivals through unique labor market strategies. He will also examine how borrowing institutions from different countries is a profitable way to enhance a company's competitiveness.


Tough Questions for Business Leaders: A Simple Approach for Better Execution

Robert Simons, Charles M. Williams Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

Executing strategy requires tough choices. Unfortunately, many managers avoid choosing in the mistaken belief that they can have it all. Instead of focusing on one primary customer, they try to serve many different types of customers. Instead of instilling values that prioritize the interests of shareholders, customers, and employees, they develop lists of aspirational attributes. Instead of focusing on what could cause their strategy to fail, they build complex scorecards with an overload of measures. The result: disappointing performance and declining market position. To guard against these risks, we will review the seven strategy questions that all executives (and directors) should ask to ensure that business leaders are making the tough choices that ensure successful strategy execution and winning in highly competitive, global markets.

Related Resources:
Fall 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


Becoming a Harvard MBA: Lessons from the Class of 2006

Scott A. Snook, MBA Class of 1958 Senior Lecturer of Business Administration
Less Info

HBS advertises itself as a "transformational leader development experience," with a mission "to educate leaders who make a difference in the world." Professor Snook asks: Is it indeed transformational? If so, how so? From what into what? What are the mechanisms of change? Aside from learning how to do a discounted cash flow, how are its graduates different in a deeper sense as a result of their two years here? In this seminar, he will share what he learned from his longitudinal study of approximately 50 students from the HBS Class of 2006. By listening closely to what they told him, he gained some insight into what it truly means to "become a Harvard MBA."


Just Enough: Enduring Success

Howard H. Stevenson, Sarofim-Rock Professor of Business Administration, Emeritus
Less Info

HBS advertises itself as a "transformational leader development experience," with a mission "to educate leaders who make a difference in the world." Professor Snook asks: Is it indeed transformational? If so, how so? From what into what? What are the mechanisms of change? Aside from learning how to do a discounted cash flow, how are its graduates different in a deeper sense as a result of their two years here? In this seminar, he will share what he learned from his longitudinal study of approximately 50 students from the HBS Class of 2006. By listening closely to what they told him, he gained some insight into what it truly means to "become a Harvard MBA."


The Moral Leader: Lessons from Moral Leadership in Action

Sandra J. Sucher, MBA Class of 1966 Professor of Management Practice
Less Info

Dean Nohria urges you to be a leader of competence and character, but what, exactly, does that entail? In this multimedia talk, we will look for clues in the actions of three different leaders at moments of deep institutional crisis and personal challenge. Their leadership tasks were diverse: waging war, running a major newspaper, and managing the affairs of a nation. Yet all three were able to make crucial decisions, take action, and lead themselves and others while staying true to their own values. From their lives, experiences, and examples, we will draw surprising insights and practical lessons about the exercise of moral leadership.

Related Resources:
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


The Wise Leader

Hirotaka Takeuchi, Professor of Management Practice
Less Info

To become a wise leader, he or she will have to be many things at the same time:

  • a philosopher who grasps the essence of a problem and draws general conclusions from random observations;
  • a master craftsman who understands the key issues of the moment and acts on them immediately;
  • an idealist who will do what he believes is right and good for the company and society;
  • a politician who can spur people to action;
  • novelist who uses metaphors, stories, and rhetoric; and
  • a teacher with good values and strong principles, from whom others want to learn.

Related Resources:
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


Viral Marketing Via Ad Symbiosis

Thales S. Teixeira, Assistant Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

Successful viral marketing campaigns have to benefit the brand and the consumers' sharing needs. We will be discussing the novel concept of advertising symbiosis (i.e., creating marketing campaigns with mutual benefits) and other empirically proven techniques to succeed in launching low-cost viral marketing campaigns.

Related Resources:
Fall 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


Why Some Companies Are More Innovative Than Others

Stefan H. Thomke, William Barclay Harding Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

Why do companies like Apple constantly come out with exciting innovations while others have great difficulty going beyond traditional product and service offerings? Professor Thomke argues that an organization's ability to innovate depends on constantly experimenting with new products, processes, and business models. He will explain why experimentation is so critical to the management of innovation, underscore the impact of new technologies, and outline what managers must do to integrate them successfully. Drawing on a decade of research in multiple industries as diverse as automotive, semiconductors, pharmaceuticals, chemicals, and banking, he will provide striking illustrations of how companies drive strategy and value creation by accommodating their organizations to experimentation approaches. Participants should think about the session's title and be ready to share their experiences.

Related Resources:
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


European Debt Crisis

Luis M. Viceira, George E. Bates Professor
Less Info

Moderated by Professor Lal, the panel will include: Giorgos Papakonstantinou, finance minister of Greece at the inception of the Greek crisis, who negotiated the first loan package with the European Union, the International Monetary Fund, and the European Central Bank (ECB); Senior Lecturer Dante Roscini, a senior bank executive for more than twenty years and author of the current HBS cases on Greece and the European crisis; and Professor Luis M. Viceira from the Finance Unit, advisor to large intitutional investors and consultant to central banks, including the ECB. This session will explore the causes of the crisis, potential scenarios for its unfolding, possible policy response to it, and how institutions such as the German and other European governments, the ECB, and the Bundesbank could affect its course. The panel will consider what impact the crisis is likely to have on different sectors of the economy and what steps businesses might take to protect themselves.


Deficits and Debt in the USA

Richard H.K. Vietor, Paul Whiton Cherington Professor of Business Administration and Senior Associate Dean
Less Info

This presentation, after a brief background on US economic strategies in the Reagan, Bush, Clinton, and Bush eras, will focus on America's twin deficits in the 2000s. It will examine the causes of our fiscal deficits, our current account deficit, and the recent congressional compromise on the debt ceiling. It will conclude by forecasting deficits in the next ten years and by considering an alternative to congressional action.

Related Resources:
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


The Founder's Dilemmas: Anticipating and Avoiding the Pitfalls That Can Sink a Startup

Noam T. Wasserman, Associate Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

Worried about being blindsided on your entrepreneurial journey? Since 2000, Prof. Wasserman has focused on the difficult, early people decisions that founders face-decisions that have important, long-term implications for themselves and their ventures. At this session, he will discuss his new book, The Founder's Dilemmas: Anticipating and Avoiding the Pitfalls That Can Sink a Startup, and his course, Founders' Dilemmas. The book and the course integrate his research results, quantitative data (collected on 10,000 founders), and case studies to help founders and others involved in startups understand where their early decisions are likely to lead.

Related Resources:
Fall 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides

Related HBS Programs:
Launching New Ventures


Deal-making Lessons from the NFL

Andrew Wasynczuk, Senior Lecturer of Business Administration
Less Info

As chief operating officer for the New England Patriots through the 1990s and 2000s, Professor Wasynczuk negotiated hundreds of player contracts. In this presentation, he will discuss key lessons learned through some of his "failed" negotiations. The relevance of these principles will then be tested in several diverse contexts, including high-tech, joint venture negotiations and settlement discussions in wrongful death cases.

Related Resources:
Fall 2012 Presentation Slides


Why We Tax What We Tax how We Tax

Matthew C. Weinzierl, Assistant Professor of Business Administration
Less Info

With an election in November and the threat of "taxmageddon" in 2013, the United States is in the thick of a heated debate over its tax policy, with proposals ranging from the flatter taxes of Governor Romney and Congressman Paul Ryan's plan to the increased progressivity of President Obama's "Buffett Rule." This discussion will use insights from research and history to uncover the fundamental forces behind the trends and the current mix of taxes in the United States and other rich countries as well as to understand where the country might want, or need, to go from here.

Related Resources:
Fall 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


Negotiation and Leadership: Lessons for Today from the American Civil War

Michael A. Wheeler, MBA Class of 1952 Professor of Management Practice
Less Info

A young Union officer, Joshua Chamberlain, leads a regiment that once numbered nearly 1,000 men but has fewer than 300 now. He has also just been put in charge of 120 "mutineers." Like him, they are volunteers from Maine. They claim that their enlistments have expired and insist on going home. They are delivered to him after having been marched at bayonet point without being fed for three days. Chamberlain is authorized to shoot them if they refuse to join his regiment and fight. The battle at Gettysburg is looming. What should Chamberlain do? Professor Wheeler will discussion this case with stop-start analysis of video and slides. No special preparation is required.


The Digital Revolution: How Technology Is Changing the World

David B. Yoffie, Max and Doris Starr Professor of International Business Administration
Less Info

Cloud computing, social networking, the explosion of smartphones and tablets, and the drive to connect all digital products together are having a profound impact on management, strategies, and the way we live our lives. This session will explore the underlying drivers of technological change, the critical trends in technology today, and the impact this revolution will have on tomorrow.

Related Resources:
Fall 2012 Presentation Slides


Aging Parents: Navigating the Journey Successfully

Janet Simpson Benvenuti (MBA 1985), Founder and CEO, Circle of Life Partners
Less Info

Are you responsible for aging parents and other loved ones while juggling the demands of your professional career? If so, join a panel of alumni and aging experts to hear about specific strategies and resources for navigating your parents' later years successfully. Learn how to address the legal, financial, medical, and caregiving challenges while enjoying the benefits of multi-generational families. Each participant will receive a copy of Don't Give Up on Me! Supporting Aging Parents Successfully, Janet's highly acclaimed guide through the unpredictable last years of her journey with her own parents. This book has become a must read for adult children who find suddenly, just when life is on overload, that their parents need help.

The panelists are Kenneith J. Bacon (MBA 1982), Jane Beule (MBA 1982), and Richard A. Redelfs (MBA 1982)


The Sandwich Generation

Janet Simpson Benvenuti (MBA 1985), Founder and CEO, Circle of Life Partners
Less Info

Are you a member of the sandwich generation? Are you squeezed between the simultaneous demands of caring for aging parents and supporting dependent children? Often members of the sandwich generation face difficulties in allocating time and money and often feel pulled in two directions. How do you cope with caring for your parents and your children? We want to provide you with the opportunity to talk with one another around challenges and issues surrounding this topic. Join us for a panel discussion to meet and speak with other alumni who are in a similar life stage.

The panelists are DeLonn Michael Crosby (MBA 2007), Ann Woodward Iannuccillo (MBA 1997), Sachin H. Jain (MBA 2007), and Stephen D. Johnston (MBA 2002).


Why We Must Use a Medical Model to Preserve the Global Environment

Eric Chivian, MD, Founder and Director, The Center for Health and the Global Environment, and Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School
Less Info

Many people find it difficult to understand what changes to the global environment mean to them and their families. Such changes are often experienced as abstract, intangible events, happening somewhere else, separate from themselves. There may be no better way to help people grasp their intimate connection with the natural world than to talk about how their health is affected when that world is altered. This talk shall be filled with stories to illustrate this—about Polar Bears and what they can teach us about osteoporosis, kidney failure, and obesity-related Type 2 diabetes; about a family of snails that live in coral reefs called Cone Snails that may contain more human medicines than any group of organisms on Earth; and about various frogs and toads and the secrets they hold—for the surgical repair of tissues, for developing new antibiotics that prevent antibiotic resistance from forming, and for treating ulcers. The focus will be on preventing the loss of organisms that will help us treat human diseases and relieve suffering by heeding scientists' warnings that we must reduce our greenhouse gas emissions. The talk will make the case that it is essential that we employ a medical model in efforts to protect the global environment.

Dr. Chivian shared the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize for Co-founding International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War.

Related Resources:
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


The $1,000 Genome: The Brave New World of Personal Genomics

Kevin Davies Ph.D., Founding Editor and Editor-in-Chief of Bio-IT World and author of The $1,000 Genome
Less Info

In 2007, James Watson, who co-discovered the iconic double helix, received the first personal genome sequence at a cost of around $1 million. Today, the cost of reading an individual's complete DNA sequence has dropped to just a few thousand dollars, available to anybody with a doctor's note, and appears poised to plummet even further—earlier this year, a British company unveiled a disposable sequencer-on-a-USB-stick! More importantly, a full genome analysis is offering life-saving diagnoses and treatment options for a growing number of cancer patients and patients suffering serious, previously undiagnosed genetic disorders. But are we overpromising the benefits of genome sequencing and underestimating the risks? Science editor and author Kevin Davies, a regular guest at HBS alumni reunions, will spotlight the stunning progress in DNA sequencing technology and their growing impact in the clinic, share his experiences in decoding his own genome, and discuss the medical and ethical implications of personal genomics.

Related Resources:
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


The Challenge of the Changing Workforce

Tamara J. Erickson (MBA 1978), President, The Concours Institute
Less Info

Seismic shifts are occurring in the workforce. Over the next several years, the number of jobs created could begin to outstrip the number of people who desire to participate in the workforce. And, values toward "work" are changing. Today four generations are working together—each bringing different experiences and assumptions to the job. These and other changes will affect the relationships we forge with employees, the opportunities ahead for us and our children, our approaches to education, our philosophies toward retirement, and the fundamental way we live out our lives.

In this provocative and fun session, Tammy offers a deep understanding of the composition of the future workforce, characteristics and expectations of the four generations in today's workforce, and actions to attract and retain great talent.


How Biology Has Changed the Global Economy, Is Transforming the World's Largest Businesses, and Will Change Even the Human Species

Juan Enriquez (MBA 1986), Managing Director, Excel Venture Management
Less Info

We have had 26 species of humans and are now beginning to birth the 27th. As we modify viruses and bacteria to compute, vaccinate, retrovirally treat, or crowd out harmful pathogens, we begin to take direct and deliberate control over the evolution of various species. We are doing the same with bacteria, plants, animals, and ourselves. This changes man from a humanoid that is aware of and modifies its environment into a species that directly and deliberately guides evolution. And this is changing everything, including our life span, religions, ethics, the power of various countries, and, not least, businesses and industries.

Related Resources:
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


Estate and Gift Taxes—Back to the Future

Offered by HBS Gift Planning, featuring Cameron Casey, Ropes & Gray, Christopher D. Perry, Senior Fiduciary Officer, Northern Trust; and moderator Donald Etheridge, Director of Gift Planning, HBS
Less Info

Estate and Gift Planning after 2012—Back to the Future: Discussion on the potential impact of the estate and gift tax laws reverting to the 2001 exemption level of $1M per person and estate and gift tax rates going back up to 55% in 2013, and what types of planning options should one be considering before December 31, 2012 to take advantage of the current $5M exemption level per person and lower gift tax rates.

Related Resources:
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides
Fall 2012 Presentation Slides


Who's Got Your Back: Building Relationships for Success in Life

Keith E. Ferrazzi, MBA 1992, Chief Executive Officer, Ferrazzi Greenlight
Less Info

Who's Got Your Back? is a breakthrough program to build deep, trusting relationships that create success and won't let you fail. In this interactive keynote, participants will learn:

  • the Four Mindsets to building deeper, more trusting "lifeline relationships";
  • tips and tools for overcoming the career-crippling habits that hold us back;
  • how to set goals in a dramatically more powerful way;
  • why we should replace "yes men" in our lives with those who get it and care and will hold us accountable to achieving our goals; and
  • how to lower our guards and let others help.

None of us can do it alone. We need the perspective and advice of a trusted team. In this presentation, Mr. Ferrazzi shows us how to put our own "dream team" together.

Related Resources:
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Handout


Harvard i-Lab Presentation & Tour

Gordon Jones, Director, Harvard Innovation Lab
Less Info

Newly opened in November 2011, the Innovation Lab—or i-lab—is designed to foster team-based and entrepreneurial activities and to deepen interactions among students, faculty, entrepreneurs, and the Boston community. The lab provides public areas and meeting rooms designed to foster project work, as well as business development resources for companies, nonprofits, entrepreneurs, and other individuals in the Allston-Brighton neighborhood and Boston area. This is a central place where students, practitioners, and local businesses can work together, share knowledge, and collaborate on ideas. Join us for a presentation, video, and tour of the Harvard Innovation Lab.

Related Resources:
Harvard innovation lab


Independent Consulting: How to Thrive as an Elite Executive and Stand Out from the Competition

Laura Klein, MBA 1996, Director, Client Service, Business Talent Group, LLC
Less Info

This presentation will focus on the new world paradigm of independent consulting as a career choice, not simply a transitory professional state. Discussion will examine the implications of "The Rise of the Supertemp," from an article featured as "The Big Idea'" in the May 2012 issue of the Harvard Business Review (and co-authored by Jody Miller, the CEO of Business Talent Group).

Topics covered include "hot areas" and future trends for independent consulting and how talent can best "jump in" and take advantage of these trends. Key success factors addressed:

  • How to best prepare for an engagement
  • Tenets of success as a top-tier consultant
  • What project profiles best lend themselves to interim/consulting roles for the elite independent

This session will be interactive, and will allow plenty of time for Q+A.

Related Resources:
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


The Geek Shall Inherit the Earth: Computer Science in an MBA Program

David Malan, Senior Lecturer on Computer Science, Harvard University Maxwell Dworkin Laboratory
Less Info

CS50 is the College's introduction to Computer Science for engineers and entrepreneurs alike. In recent years, enrollment in the course has surged 465% to 746 students, among whom now are some of HBS's own MBAs. As of Fall 2012, CS50 is Harvard's largest course. In this talk, we present the culture and curriculum of CS50, including its apprenticeship model of learning, its technological innovations, and its applicability to fields beyond the sciences.

Related Resources:
Fall 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


Every Child, Every Classroom: Innovations to Achieve Better Student Outcomes in Public Education

Dean Kathleen McCartney, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Less Info

We know the problem: high drop-out rates in our nation's largest cities, persistent achievement gaps, and low international rankings on standardized tests. Education is front and center in national debates about the future of the country. This attention, coupled with unprecedented investments, both private and public, has created a window of opportunity for action. At the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE), the belief is that education is not an intractable problem, and that higher education has a critical role to play in bringing good ideas to scale. Robert Steven Kaplan, Professor of Management Practice and Senior Associate Dean, External Relations will interview Kathleen McCartney, Dean, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Related Resources:
Fall 2012 Presentation Slides


The Promise of Stem Cell Science

Douglas Melton, PhD, the Thomas Dudley Cabot Professor in the Natural Sciences at Harvard University and an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and a co-director of Harvard's Stem Cell Institute
Less Info

Advances in stem cell science have moved closer to the development of new medicines and cellular transplantations for degenerative diseases. This science of how our bodies are made and maintained by stem cells is also opening a door to regeneration and a life of healthy aging.

Related Resources:
Fall 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


Endowment Management in a Changing World

Jane Mendillo, President and CEO, Harvard Management Company
Less Info

The Harvard Management Company (HMC) is dedicated solely to the management of Harvard University's endowment and related assets. With about 35% of the University's annual budget dependent on endowment income, HMC's goal is to generate strong, sustainable investment returns to support the needs and goals of the university. Over the last 20 years, HMC's average annual return of 12.9% is substantially better than the 8.3% earned by a 60/40 stock/bond portfolio and the 9.8% annual return for the endowment's Policy Portfolio benchmark. HMC benefits by employing a unique model of investment management, using both internal portfolio managers and traders as well as a select set of external investment management firms across a range of asset classes and geographies. This hybrid approach gives Harvard several advantages as an investor, from significant cost savings associated with internal management to greater degrees of market insight and increased nimbleness in moving among investments.


Independent Consulting: How to Thrive as an Elite Executive and Stand Out from the Competition

Jill Miller Perrin, MBA 1985, Senior Vice President, Client Service, Business Talent Group LLC
Less Info

This presentation will focus on the new world paradigm of independent consulting as a career choice, not simply a transitory professional state. Discussion will examine the implications of "The Rise of the Supertemp," from an article featured as "The Big Idea'" in the May 2012 issue of the Harvard Business Review (and co-authored by Jody Miller, the CEO of Business Talent Group).

Topics covered include "hot areas" and future trends for independent consulting and how talent can best "jump in" and take advantage of these trends. Key success factors addressed:

  • How to best prepare for an engagement
  • Tenets of success as a top-tier consultant
  • What project profiles best lend themselves to interim/consulting roles for the elite independent

This session will be interactive, and will allow plenty of time for Q+A.

Related Resources:
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


What Boards are Looking For in the Year Ahead

Julie Norris (MBA/JD 1993), Partner, CTPartners
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Boards are under pressure from shareholders and other constituencies to oversee corporate performance in a still uncertain economy. Traditional sources of director talent are drying up, and active CEOs are less able to serve on outside boards than before. Do you have the skills and expertise that corporate boards are looking for? This session will provide an overview of current trends and offer suggestions for finding and evaluating board opportunities. Key takeaways will include:

  • How to develop a game plan to make yourself more visible to boards
  • Questions you should ask when considering joining a board
  • Qualities and experiences boards are looking for in new directors
  • Understanding the process boards use to find directors

Finding Huck Finn: Reclaiming Childhood from a River of Electronic Screens

Michael Ogden Rich, MD, MPH, Mediatrician and Director of the Center on Media and Child Health, Children's Hospital Boston and Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School
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Today's children are growing up in a world transformed by interactive media. As parents and others who care for children, how can we tell if these media are helping or hurting them? How can we make sure that their media environment supports their health and development? As Mediatrician® and Director of the Center on Media and Child Health at Children's Hospital Boston, Michael Rich, MD, MPH, offers research-based, balanced answers to these and other urgent questions about parenting in the Media Age.

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Spring 2012 Presentation Slides


The Future of Energy in a Changing World

Daniel P. Schrag, Professor of Geology, Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering, and Director of the Harvard University Center for the Environment
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Concerns about climate change and about conventional air pollution gave motivated a world-wide effort to eliminate the use of fossil fuels. How much progress has been made? Remarkable improvements in the cost of renewable energy have occurred over the past decade, but the largest innovation has been in hydrocarbon extraction, specifically through improvements in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. How is the world energy system likely to develop over the coming decades, in the face of serious environmental challenges? A variety of strategies will be discussed for meeting the world's energy needs with the smallest possible impact on our atmosphere.

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Fall 2012 Presentation Slides


Neuroscience and the Roots of Human Capital Development: Implications for Economic Productivity and Corporate Responsibility

Dr. Jack P. Shonkoff, Julius B. Richmond FAMRI Professor in Child Health and Development; Director, Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University; Professor of Pediatrics
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There is a broad understanding that the current explosion of knowledge in neuroscience, molecular biology, and genomics is fueling investment in new technologies that will revolutionize the way we treat disease. Less appreciated is the extent to which this same science could inform more effective approaches to education reform, workforce development, health promotion, crime prevention, and the reduction of intergenerational poverty. This session will provide an overview of the science of early childhood and early brain development for business leaders who are interested in strengthening the US workforce, building human capital in developing countries, and leveraging scientific advances to generate innovative solutions to enduring societal problems as a new strategy for corporate responsibility.

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Spring 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Handout


Making Health Care Better and More Affordable

Peter L. Slavin, MD (MBA 1990), President of Massachusetts General Hospital and Professor of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School
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Health care costs in the US have been growing 2 times faster than the rest of the US economy for decades. How can we bend the cost curve and improve the quality of care delivered to the American people?

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Fall 2012 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Slides