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Are We on the Cusp of a New World Economic Order?

Professor Rawi E. Abdelal and Professor Louis T. Wells, Moderated by Senior Lecturer Jim Sharpe
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Friday, September 23; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

The current economic superpowers, Japan, Western Europe, and the US, are experiencing low birth rates and aging populations both of which are likely to constrain their future abilities to grow. Who will be the winners and losers in this new environment? Will the current economic superpowers stagnate? Will one or more of the BRICs—Brazil, Russia, India and China—take their place? How will the increasing influence of the BRICs affect international business rules and governing institutions: the WTO (for trade and intellectual property), ICSID and other protections for foreign investors, and the governance of the international capital flows? Are multinational firms that have their origins in the BRICs "different" from those with origins in Europe, the United States, and Japan? If so, how, and what are the implications for the traditional multinationals? Professor Louis T. Wells and Professor Rawi E. Abdelal both of whom teach in the Business, Government, and International Economy group at HBS will lead a discussion of these important issues.


The Progress Principle

Professor Teresa M. Amabile
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Friday, September 23; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

What really makes people happy, motivated, productive, and creative at work? Our new research, based on analyzing nearly 12,000 daily diaries of team members working on collaborative creative projects, reveals some surprising answers. Inner work life—a person's day-by-day emotions, perceptions and motivation—has a profound effect on the person's creative productivity. And, of all the good things that can boost inner work life, the single most important is simply making progress on meaningful work—even if that progress is a small step forward. This is the Progress Principle. Its implication? Sustained creative productivity and employee well-being depend less on elaborate incentive systems or performance-management processes than on techniques for facilitating the small wins that constitute daily work progress.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Video


The Power of Small Wins

Professor Teresa M. Amabile
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Friday, June 3; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.

What really makes people happy, motivated, productive, and creative at work? Our new research, based on analyzing nearly 12,000 daily diaries of team members working on collaborative creative projects, reveals some surprising answers. Inner work life—a person's day-by-day emotions, perceptions and motivation—has a profound effect on the person's creative productivity. And, of all the good things that can boost inner work life, the single most important is simply making progress on meaningful work—even if that progress is a small step forward. This is the Progress Principle. Its implication? Sustained creative productivity and employee well-being depend less on elaborate incentive systems or performance-management processes than on techniques for facilitating the small wins that constitute daily work progress.

Related Resources:
Spring 2011 Presentation Summary
Spring 2011 Presentation Slides (available upon request)
Spring 2011 Presentation Video
The Power of Small Wins (HBR Article)


Changing Health Practices Globally

Associate Professor Nava Ashraf

Designing Care

Richard M.J. Bohmer
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Saturday, June 4; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

In spite of years of reform of healthcare financing and the structure of the delivery system, academic research reveals a troubling picture of rising costs, fatal errors, and the simultaneous under- and over-provision of care. Moreover, the aging of the baby boomers, an avalanche of new science and technology, and an expected manpower shortage may make things even worse. In response, delivery organization managers have increasingly looked to production industries for models of organization and process design to improve the efficiency and quality of healthcare delivery, with only mixed success. This session will discuss the nature of medical care, the ways in which evolving medical science has and has not changed the practice of medicine, and the implications for patients, doctors, and managers.

Related Resources:
Designing Care: Aligning the Nature and Management of Health Care (book)
Evidence-Creating Medicine: Designing for Learning (book chapter)
The Shifting Mission of Health Care Delivery Organizations (article)
The Risk Management Foundation of the Harvard Medical Institutions, Inc. (Case)
Performance Management at Intermountain Healthcare (Case)
Newton-Wellesley Hospital (Case)

Related HBS Programs:
Healthcare Delivery Programs


Principles of Management That We Teach That Are Not Always True

Clayton M. Christensen
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Saturday, September 24; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.
Friday, June 3; 10:00 a.m. –11:45 p.m.

Historically, innovation has seemed to be expensive and risky. Our research has shown, however, that the root cause of the spotty results are often principles of "good management" that are taught at HBS and elsewhere. In this session, we'll describe which of the principles we teach are the greatest culprits in causing innovations to fail.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides
Spring 2011 Presentation Summary
Spring 2011 Presentation Video


Giving Something Back to Society

Professor Michael Chu
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Saturday, September 24; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

A number of HBS alumni have expressed a desire to give something back to society while also stating they are not quite sure how to go about it. Michael Chu who teaches at HBS in the social enterprise group will lead a panel discussion on "Giving Back." The panel, all HBS alumni, with extensive experience in the non-profit world consists of:

Chris Crane is the founder and CEO of Edify Inc., a humanitarian organization that makes small business loans to sustainable schools educating impoverished children in Africa and Latin America.

Karen Robards is a founder, past President and Chairman of the Board of The Cooke Center for Learning & Development which provides quality inclusive education to individuals with special needs, regardless of ability to pay.

Chris Rodrigues was made by The Queen a CBE (Commander of the British Empire) for his various charitable endeavors.

Eileen Rudden is the Chief of the Office of College and Career Preparation at Chicago Public Schools, the third largest K-12 school system in the nation

Sam Yates is the Chief Operating Officer of the Migraine Research Foundation.


Private Sector & Public Responsibilities: The Role of Business in Social Issues

Professor Michael Chu
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Friday, June 3; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.

Some goods and services (such as water, education, healthcare, energy) are considered so basic that access by all citizens is often deemed the responsibility of the public sector, especially when low-income populations and developing countries are involved. But empirical research shows cases where business has stepped in to deliver these basic items to the base of the socioeconomic pyramid. Can commercial enterprises do it better? And what if they earn attractive returns while doing it? Is this process good or bad for society? These issues are at the center of Professor Chu's work and he looks forward to a lively class discussion.

Related HBS Programs:
Building Businesses in Emerging Markets
Corporate Social Responsibility
Global Strategic Management


Project Antares Brings High-Impact Interventions to Low-Income Populations: A collaboration between HBS and the Harvard School of Public Health

Professors Michael Chu and Howard Stevenson
Roslyn Braeman Payne (MBA 1970)
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Saturday, June 4; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

Can a $25 incubator change health prospects for newborns in Nepal—and earn back enough money for its manufacturer to turn a profit and hew to its humanitarian mission?

That's the kind of challenge that Project Antares, a unique collaboration between the Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Business School, seeks to address. Project Antares aims to combat public health threats that disproportionately affect poor families, and build on those successes by developing curricula to train leaders in business, public health, and policy. Under the Project's auspices, students from HBS and HSPH have conducted 13 field studies in nine countries. These studies have included not only efforts to distribute $25 incubators in Nepal, but campaigns to fine-tune a primary health care model in rural India that empowers "village health champions"; and to leverage a microfinance effort to deliver health services to women in Bolivia, Nicaragua, and Peru through an organization called Pro Mujer.

Launched four years ago with the guidance of HBS Professor Howard Stevenson and through a gift from primary donor Roslyn Braeman Payne, HBS 1970, along with support from the Brinson Foundation, the Project focuses on commercial approaches to delivering high-impact health interventions to low-income populations. Now Payne has made an additional pledge to join with others to ensure that the Project can continue its quest for enlightened and cost-effective public health interventions that can be sustained as for-profit ventures, rather than relying on continual government support or uncertain grant funding.

"Countries with thoughtful public health policies and systems help create wealth for their people," says Payne. "Public health is one of the most successful forms of global leverage, and Project Antares is trying to accelerate this leverage through original research, teaching, and collaboration with various organizations. I am honored to be a part of a very special effort with a very special team."

The project is co-directed by David Bloom, Clarence James Gamble Professor of Economics and Demography at HSPH, and Michael Chu, Senior Lecturer at Harvard Business School. Chu and Bloom have set several goals for the project for the next few years, including teaching a joint course at HSPH and HBS based on the findings from Project Antares.

Senior Lecturer Michael Chu, Professor Howard Stevenson, and Roslyn Payne will discuss Project Antares, the collaboration between the two schools at Harvard University, and the "lessons learned" for the future.


Innovating at the World's Crossroads: How Multiculturalism Promotes Creativity

Assistant Professor Roy Y.J. Chua
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Friday, June 3; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

In the age of globalization, people cross cultural lines every day. To stay competitive, organizations and individuals increasingly must innovate in a multicultural space. Conventional wisdom suggests that cultural diversity promotes cross-fertilization of ideas and perspectives, enhancing creativity—yet the creative potential of multiculturalism is not always realized. When does exposure to diverse cultures facilitate creativity? Or could a multicultural environment potentially suppress new ideas? In this presentation, Professor Roy Chua will discuss current research that investigates how the confluence of diverse cultures impacts people's ability to think creatively.

Related Resources:
Spring 2011 Presentation Slides

Related HBS Program:
Driving Performance Through Talent Management


How to Decode Insider Trading

Associate Professor Lauren H. Cohen
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Saturday, September 24; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

In this presentation, we will discuss a new technique for decoding the information in insider trades. Exploiting the fact that insiders trade for a variety of reasons, we'll show that there is predictable, identifiable "routine" insider trading that is not informative for the future of firms. Stripping away these routine trades, which comprise over half the entire universe of insider trades, leaves a set of information-rich "opportunistic" trades that contains all the predictive power in the insider trading universe. A portfolio strategy that focuses solely on opportunistic insider trades yields value-weight abnormal returns of 82 basis points per month, while the abnormal returns associated with routine traders are essentially zero. Further, opportunistic trades predict future news and events at a firm level, while routine trades do not.


Catalysts and Impediments of Economic Growth

Professor Joshua D. Coval
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Friday, June 3; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

As debates about government spending and unionization make headlines across the nation, this talk will address how and why different US regions experience different levels of economic growth and development. The discussion will center on two factors that have been the subject of recent policy debates: government spending and private sector unionization. By reviewing firm-level evidence, we'll see the impact that these two factors have had on job creation, entrepreneurship, and business investment over the past 30 years.


Risk, Precaution, and the New Regulatory Environment

Assistant Professor Arthur A. Daemmrich
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Friday, June 3; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

In this interactive lecture, Professor Daemmrich will present findings from his research comparing regulation in the United States and European Union, with a focus on emerging chemical testing programs. Participants will learn why the United States and Europe are adopting different approaches to the identification and management of risks associated with chemicals, despite similar test methods, industry structures, and pro-regulatory pressures from non-governmental organizations. In the discussion, we can consider the implications of different regulatory approaches for multinational firms, debate the emergence of the "precautionary principle" as a regulatory framework, and discuss how firms, governments, and the lay public should respond to new knowledge about the presence of synthetic compounds in our bodies and in the environment.

Related Resources:
Spring 2011 Presentation Summary
Spring 2011 Presentation Slides


Managing the Impact of Wealth on Families

Senior Lecturer John A. Davis
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Saturday, June 4; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

Wealth and the motivation to create wealth is a predominate force in society, and yet there has been little formal study of the creation of wealth or its impact on the families that possess it. Professor Davis will discuss the major issues that wealth presents a family and how families successfully manage both the opportunities and challenges created by wealth.

Related Resources:
Spring 2011 Presentation Slides


Google and Facebook

Professor John A. Deighton
Assistant Professor Benjamin G. Edelman, Associate Professor Mikolaj Jan Piskorski
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Friday, September 23; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

Some firms changed our physical lives, as Ford did with the automobile. More recently some have begun to change our psychic lives. First there was Google, which put a dent in world ignorance, and then there was Facebook, which did the same for global loneliness. Do these virtues come at a cost? They change the character of marketing, but is it for the good? They alter the line between private life and life in the marketplace, they change the balance of information between buyer and seller, they turn word-of-mouth from a one-to-one sharing activity to one-to-many broadcasting. And as Google enters Facebook's domain with Google+, what will happen to the balance of information age power??

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides


Why Smart People Won't Change

Professor Thomas J. DeLong
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Friday, September 23; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.
Saturday, June 4; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

Many people with a high need for achievement find the process of individual change very difficult. Some professionals resign themselves to organizational, personal and life situations that are miserable or where they feel caught. Professor DeLong will discuss individual motivation and how to leverage the opportunities that confront us in our professional and private lives. The presentation is based on DeLong's forthcoming book, Flying Without A Net: Turn Fear of Failure Into Fuel for Success.


Why You Aren't Buying Venezuelan Chocolate

Professor Rohit Deshpande
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Friday, September 23; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.

The next wave of global challengers will be firms from emergent market countries like Brazil, China, and India. Who are these companies and what are the barriers they are trying to overcome? Professor Deshpande will report on his research on the Provenance Paradox in global branding where companies try to be authentic to their national origins yet cannot command a "first country" price. What can companies in BRIC countries learn from their Japanese and Korean counterparts about competing against American and European firms for the hearts and minds of customers worldwide? And what can the latter firms do about the new emergent market global competitors?

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides


Integrated Reporting: An Idea Whose Time Has Come

Professor Robert G. Eccles
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Friday, September 23; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.

Integrated reporting, or "One Report," is the combination of a company's required financial report with its voluntary corporate social responsibility or sustainability report. But One Report isn't only One Report but also leverages the internet to provide more detailed information of interest to specific stakeholders, as well as to improve dialogue and engagement with all of them. The world is at the early stages of an important new management practice, already being used by companies such as Southwest Airlines in the United States, Philips in the Netherlands, and Natura in Brazil. Professor Eccles has written the first book on this subject, One Report: Integrated Reporting for a Sustainable Strategy. He is also a member of the Steering Committee of the International Integrated Reporting Committee.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides
Fall 2011 Presentation Video


Teaming: How the Learning Organization Works

Professor Amy C. Edmondson
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Saturday, June 4; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

This talk reviews research on interpersonal dynamics that affect organizational learning. Teaming—the dynamic interactions through which interdependent work is carried out—emphasizes the action rather than the structures of teamwork. This perspective on organizational learning emerged through field research in settings ranging from the front lines of health care delivery to the Space Shuttle program at NASA to the management conference room. It emphasizes the debilitating effects of interpersonal fear and examines the role of leadership in counteracting these effects.

Related Resources:
Spring 2011 Presentation Slides


The Lean Startup

Professor Thomas R. Eisenmann
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Saturday, June 4; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

Entrepreneurs who follow the "lean startup" approach strive to avoid wasting time and money. As quickly as possible, they launch a "minimum viable product" (MVP) with the smallest feature set necessary to rigorously test hypotheses about their opportunity, based on feedback from early adopters. They rapidly iterate this MVP based on a succession of tests, and pivot to a new product design, market segment, or business model when hypotheses are disproved. Eisenmann will describe his new MBA elective that explores lean startup management practices, "Launching Technology Ventures." He also will discuss the MVP Fund, through which HBS recently granted a total of $50,000 to nine student teams launching businesses that follow lean startup principles.

Related Resources:
Spring 2011 Presentation Slides

Related HBS Programs:
Building New Businesses in Established Organizations
Key Executives Program
Launching New Ventures
Owner/President Management Program


Blockbuster Strategies: Will Creative Industries Survive the Rise of Digital Technology?

Associate Professor Anita Elberse
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Friday, September 23; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.
Friday, June 3; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

The emergence of digital technology is having a profound impact on the media and entertainment industries and is putting pressure on existing business models. Drawing on empirical research involving large data sets as well as in-depth case studies of companies in this space, Professor Elberse will offer insights into consumer behavior in digital channels and the likely consequences for managers. The central question is whether popular "blockbuster strategies" remain viable in the digital age. The session will focus on issues such as the possibilities for monetizing the "long tail" of media content, the consequences of the unbundling of content, and the new rules of promoting content online.


Drilling in the Gulf: Safety and the Culture of Masculinity

Professor Robin J. Ely
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Friday, June 3; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

What can managers in white-collar firms learn from roughnecks and roustabouts on an offshore oil rig? How might gender have contributed to the recent incident in which a deep-water oil platform exploded, taking 11 lives and causing the worst oil spill in history? This presentation of findings from ethnographic research conducted on two, deep-water oil platforms in the Gulf of Mexico will address these questions. The bottom line: extinguishing macho behavior is vital to achieving top performance. Our findings suggest how a macho, hard-driving culture can compromise decisions and increase mistakes and how leaders—whether in the dirty, dangerous setting of an off-shore oil platform or in the posh, protected surroundings of the executive suite—can jettison such cultures in service of increasing effectiveness.

Related Resources:
Spring 2011 Presentation Slides


Risks of Financial Crisis and Money Market Funds: Where Do We Go From Here?

Professor Kenneth A. Froot
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Friday, June 3; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.

No Abstract Provided.

Related Resources:
Spring 2011 Presentation Summary


Authentic Leadership Development

Professor William W. George
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Friday, September 23; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.
Friday, June 3; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

Professor George will lead a discussion on ways leadership is changing in the 21st century, and how leaders are adapting to demands on themselves in the environment and from their workforce. The discussion will be built on authentic leadership through which leaders align their organizations around mission and values, empower people at all levels to step up and lead, focus on service to all their stakeholders, and create highly collaborative environments to sustain superior performance. Finally, the discussion will focus on how HBS is changing to develop "leaders that make a difference in the world," including the use of six-person leadership development groups to provide confidential, intimate support groups.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides
Spring 2011 Presentation Slides


The Unique Challenges of Leading a Science Based Business

Adjunct Professor Raymond V. Gilmartin
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Friday, September 23; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.
Friday, June 3; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.

If you are the CEO of a science based business, you invest on behalf of your successor in high risk discovery projects that have ten to fifteen year time horizons. Most of these projects will fail because of the uncertainty of the science. These investments are made in a stock market environment where shareholders do not seem to look beyond the next quarter. What are the implications for the role, responsibilities, and attributes of the CEO?

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides
Spring 2011 Presentation Summary

Related HBS Programs:
Leadership and Strategy in Pharmaceuticals and Biotech


Chasing Talent

Associate Professor Boris Groysberg
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Friday, June 3; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.

Companies need talent to drive their strategies forward—to innovate, to adapt, and to execute flawlessly. But whether you are seeking a key executive or a thousand engineers, how can you find the talent you need? In this session, we will discuss best practices for hiring, growing top-performing employees, and how leaders who take a more balanced approach to human capital management and nurture talent from within can create more resilient, successful organizations.

Related Resources:
Spring 2011 Presentation Summary


Adversity to Advantage: Breakaway Strategies for Turbulent Markets

Professor Ranjay Gulati
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Friday, September 23; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.

In a presentation based on his new book Reorganize for Resilience, HBS Professor Ranjay Gulati reveals how "resilient" companies-those that prosper in turbulent markets-are driving growth and increasing profitability by immersing themselves in the lives of their customers. By reorienting their organizations to be proactive, flexible, and truly customer-centric, these pioneering companies have driven growth in difficult times.


Facebook and Privacy

Assistant Professor Benjamin G. Edelman
Professors Sunil Gupta and Mikolaj Jan Piskorski
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Friday, June 3; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

Facebook was in the spotlight once again this year, but it had nothing to do with the movie about the company's founding. A Wall Street Journal story accused Facebook Inc. of violating the privacy of its millions of users, "transmitting identifying information" to advertising firms and Internet tracking companies. Was this business as usual for Mark Zuckerberg, a tempest in a teapot, a fact of life in a world where privacy has become a rare commodity, or something that Facebook needs to address sooner rather than later?

Three Harvard Business School faculty members who are experts in social media—Sunil Gupta and Mikolaj Jan Piskorski—offer their perspectives.

Related Resources:
Spring 2011 Presentation Summary
Spring 2011 Presentation Video


Digital Revolution

Professor Sunil Gupta
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Friday, June 3; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

Digital media, and in particular social media like YouTube, Facebook, blogs, and Twitter, represent radically new tools for reaching and collaborating with customers. This presentation will discuss the trends in new media and a framework for formulating digital strategy.

Related Resources:
Spring 2011 Presentation Summary
Spring 2011 Presentation Video


Leadership in the Age of Climate Change

Professor Rebecca M. Henderson
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Friday, June 3; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

Is the risk of significant climate change an opportunity or a threat for business? This talk will take a close look at those firms who are developing new business models—at scale—in response to the threat of climate change. We'll explore whether and when such an approach makes sense—and its potential limitations.

Related Resources:
Spring 2011 Presentation Summary
Spring 2011 Presentation Video


Health Care, What's Next?

Professor Regina E. Herzlinger
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Friday, June 3; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

Professor Herzlinger will discuss the impact of the health care reform legislation on the US health care system and economy.


Where Will We Find Tomorrow's Leaders?

Professor Linda A. Hill
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Friday, September 23; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

What kind of leadership do world-class organizations need? Professor Hill will discuss the connection between leadership and innovation, explaining that the type of leaders needed in the future may differ from those in the past.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides


Are You a Good Boss — or a Great One?

Professor Linda A. Hill
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Friday, June 3; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.

Private moments of doubt and fear come even to managers who have spent years on the job. Any number of events can trigger them: an initiative going poorly, a lukewarm performance review, a daunting new assignment. HBS professor Hill and executive Lineback have long studied the question of how managers grow and advance. Their experience brings them to a simple but troubling observation: Most bosses reach a certain level of proficiency and stay there—short of what they could and should be. Why? Because they stop working on themselves. In the presentation, Professor Hill will discuss the three imperatives to becoming a great leader in today's world: managing yourself, managing your network, and managing your team.

Related Resources:
Website: Being the Boss


Beauty Imagined

Professor Geoffrey G. Jones
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Friday, June 3; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

This talk will discuss highlights from my recently published book on the global beauty industry from the nineteenth century to the present day. I explore how successive generations of entrepreneurs built brands which shaped perceptions of beauty worldwide. They democratized access to beauty products, once the privilege of elites, but they also defined the gender and ethnic borders of beauty, and its association with a handful of cities, notably Paris and later New York. Today globalization is changing the beauty industry again. I show how global brands have swept into China, Russia, and India, but at the same time, these brands are responding to a far greater diversity of cultures and lifestyles as new markets are opened up worldwide.


The Economic Crisis and Its Aftermath: What to Ask the Person in The Mirror

Professor Robert Steven Kaplan
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Friday, September 23; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.
Friday, June 3; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

Professor Kaplan will discuss the current economic crisis and its implications.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides
Spring 2012 Presentation Video

Related HBS Programs:
The Global Economy
The Corporate Leader


How to Solve The Cost Crisis in Health Care

Professor Robert Steven Kaplan
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Friday, September 23; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

In their September 2011 HBR paper, Professors Kaplan and Porter describe a fundamental problem in health care: providers do not understand their costs for delivering health care to patients nor how to relate costs to outcomes. They demonstrate how time-driven activity-based costing provides accurate and transparent costing at the individual patient level. The approach promises to transform the economics of the health care industry by facilitating major improvements in process efficiencies, resource deployment and utilization, and sustainable cost reductions without compromising patient outcomes. It will accelerate the introduction of innovative reimbursement approaches that reward providers for delivering the best outcomes at the lowest cost, not those that perform multiple and expensive procedures. The new approach "is the previously hidden secret for solving the health care cost crisis."

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Video


Leadership in Crisis: Lessons for Here and Now

Professor Robert Steven Kaplan
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Friday, September 23; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

Through interactive lecture and visual images, this presentation will explore three examples of effective leadership in moments of great turbulence: Abraham Lincoln's leadership during the Civil War, Antarctic explorer Ernest Shackleton's leadership during the crisis of the Endurance in 1915–16 and Oprah Winfrey's leadership during the last ten years of creative destruction at the center of the media business. The presentation draws together several key lessons about individual leadership and its impact. The presentation concludes by applying these insights to our own turbulent moment.


Entrepreneurs and Entrepreneurship in China: Continuity and Transformation

Associate Professor Elisabeth Köll
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Friday, September 23; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.
Friday, June 3; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

The nature of entrepreneurship in China, in particular the relationship between Chinese entrepreneurs and the government, is a much debated topic. In the context of ongoing market-oriented reforms and stunning economic development, the impact of private entrepreneurship on economic growth and the emerging business environment is significant. What role do entrepreneurs play in "Chinese capitalism with socialist characteristics"? We will explore the historical legacies of China's new entrepreneurial class, the transformation of entrepreneurs and their companies under changing political frameworks, and what this means for our assessment of private companies, state-owned enterprises, and hybrid models in China's economy today. My presentation will address the opportunities and challenges for entrepreneurial activities as well as the resulting implications for foreign companies with business interests in China.

Related HBS Programs:
Key Executives Program
Launching New Ventures
Owner/President Management Program


The Harvard Innovation Lab — An Update

Professors Joseph B. Lassiter and Peter Tufano
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Saturday, June 4; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

The University is launching the Harvard innovation lab to encourage entrepreneurship and innovation throughout the University. The i-lab will seek initially to bring together interested parties at the Business School (HBS), the School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS), the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS), the Kennedy School of Government (KSG), the Law School (HLS) and hopefully extending to the other schools in the future. Located on Western Avenue in the old WBGH studio next to HBS, the innovation lab will provide physical space and extensive IT support to foster team-based entrepreneurial activities, classroom space for project-oriented courses, lectures, and direct access to entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, lawyers, product development experts, and other friends of Harvard who have volunteered to provide their expertise to our community.

Related Resources:
Spring 2011 Presentation Summary
Spring 2011 Presentation Slides
Spring 2011 Presentation Video


Private Equity at a Crossroads: What's Next?

Professor Josh Lerner
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Friday, September 23; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.
Friday, June 3; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.

Both the buyout and venture capital industries face unprecedented challenges today. After an orgy of investments in the mid-2000s, private equity funds suffered a hangover of epic proportions. In recent quarters, however, the rate and pace of deal-making has recovered in a manner that has surprised even the most optimistic observers. Meanwhile, venture capital—after a prolonged drought—shows signs of a surge in transactions, driven by social media firms. But all is not rosy: many of the investors on which these funds have traditionally depended, such as endowments and pensions, have deep problems, which is affecting the flow of capital to the sector. This talk will explore this unsettled and often mysterious territory, and offer some surprising predictions about the future of these sectors.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides
Spring 2011 Presentation Summary
Spring 2011 Presentation Slides
Spring 2011 Presentation Video

Related HBS Programs:
Private Equity and Venture Capital


Powerful Politicians: Earmarks, Social Connections, and Insider Trading

Associate Professor Christopher J. Malloy
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Friday, June 3; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

This session will investigate links between US politicians and corporate America. We will discuss the process by which powerful politicians use their power to obtain earmarks and increased government spending for their home states. We will show that this type of government spending has distortionary effects on private sector economic activity, in the form of reduced investment and R&D by corporations. We will demonstrate that social connections amongst politicians, and between politicians and firms, have a significant impact on the voting behavior of legislators. Lastly we will investigate recent claims that politicians may be trading on illegal insider information in their personal stock portfolios.


Turnaround Manager: An Entrepreneur

Professor Paul W. Marshall
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Friday, September 23; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.
Friday, June 3; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

If you think of a life cycle for a company, the beginning is often viewed as needing an entrepreneur. What about the period of decline? If an entrepreneur takes over the management of a company in decline will the management skills needed in a startup be useful? Professor Marshall offers an EC course entitled Entrepreneurial Management in the Turnaround Environment that addresses this question.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides
Spring 2011 Presentation Slides

Related HBS Programs:
Key Executives Program
Launching New Ventures
Owner/President Management Program
Turnaround Management Strategies


Power Shift? Atomic Energy and the Environment following the Japanese Earthquake Crises?

Associate Professor Noel Maurer
Less Info

Friday, June 3; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

Professor Noel Maurer will discuss the safety and economics of nuclear power, and provide a brief prognostication about the industry's future in light of the unfolding disaster in Japan.

Related Resources:
Spring 2011 Presentation Slides
Spring 2011 Presentation Video


Defining Greatness — Lessons Learned from Business Legends

Lecturer Anthony Mayo
Less Info

Friday, June 3; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.

Would Walt Disney be a success in today's hypermedia environment? Would Henry Ford's uncompromising focus on productivity through mass production resonate with today's automobile industry? Could Jack Welch lead today with the approach that gave him and his company such prominence just a few years ago? Business leaders—whether legends of the last century or trailblazers of the current one—do not operate in a vacuum. In any era, executives lead within environments that are constantly reconfigured by contextual factors-political, regulatory, social, and others—that breed both obstacles and opportunities. Which of the 20th century's many great leaders were most adept at exploiting the opportunities of their times? And what lessons do their legacies hold for the study and practice of leadership today?

Related Resources:
Spring 2011 Presentation Summary


Social Enterprise Governance — it is different

Emeritus Professor F. Warren McFarlan
Less Info

Friday, September 23; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.
Friday, June 3; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.

This session will be built off my new book Joining a Nonprofit Board—What you need to know. These mission driven organizations are very different in character than for-profit organizations. The role of board members, the importance of mission identification, measurement of mission performance and the role of finances and philanthropy create a very different environment from the for-profit board. It is very easy for people from a for-profit background to make false steps in this environment which are difficult to recover from.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides
Spring 2011 Presentation Summary
Spring 2011 Presentation Slides
Spring 2011 Presentation Video


Looking Up and Looking Out: Effects of Workgroup Sex and Race Composition on Turnover Among Professionals

Professor Kathleen L. McGinn
Less Info

Saturday, June 4; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

Increased diversity in the entry level ranks has not translated to similar diversity among organizations' leaders due to different promotion and turnover rates across demographic groups. This research investigates the role of workgroup sex and race composition on turnover among junior professionals. Studying lawyers at a large US firm over five years, we examine the effects of a professional's demographic match with superiors and peers on the likelihood of voluntary and involuntary exit. We argue that social identification with same sex and race superiors will stimulate positive social comparisons, reducing the likelihood that a junior professional will leave the organization, but social identification with same sex and race peers may provoke negative social comparisons, mitigating potentially positive cohesion effects and increasing the chance of exit. Supporting predictions, junior attorneys working in groups with higher proportions of same sex senior attorneys are less likely to exit, while those working in groups with higher proportions of same sex and same race peers are more likely to exit. The effects hold across demographic groups, but vary by minority/majority status, disproportionately affecting women and underrepresented minorities.

Related Resources:
Spring 2011 Presentation Slides


Putting the Financial Crisis in Perspective: What History Tells Us About Financial Turmoil and How to Prevent It

Professor David A. Moss
Less Info

Friday, September 23; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.
Friday, June 3; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.

In his talk, Professor Moss will briefly examine the history of financial crises and financial regulation in the United States and suggest what this history tells us about the recent crisis and how best to ensure a healthy and stable financial system going forward.

Related Resources:
Spring 2011 Presentation Summary
Spring 2011 Presentation Video

Related HBS Programs:
The Global Economy


How Charitable Giving Improves Your Own Happiness — and Your Organization's Bottom Line

Associate Professor Michael I. Norton
Less Info

Friday, September 23; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.
Friday, June 3; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

Can money make you happy? Our research suggests that it can—if you give it away. We show that encouraging people to spend on others—for example, by giving them $20 in the morning and asking them to give it away by the end of the day—makes people happier than spending on themselves. In addition, the positive impact of behaving charitably can improve organizational health and performance. When we gave employees in two organizations "prosocial incentives" (bonuses given to charity or spent on co-workers) rather than standard incentives (bonuses for themselves), both employee satisfaction and job performance improved dramatically. I will discuss how these findings change the way organizations should think about incentivizing employees—and how we should think about spending our own money.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides
Spring 2011 Presentation Summary
Spring 2011 Presentation Slides
Spring 2011 Presentation Video


Winning in Emerging Markets

Professor Krishna G. Palepu
Less Info

Friday, September 23; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.
Friday, June 3; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

This presentation is based on a new book published by Tarun Khanna and Krishna Palepu, Winning in Emerging Markets: A Road Map for Strategy and Execution. The presentation will discuss: Unique opportunities and challenges in operating in fast rising emerging markets of the world. Using case examples, the presentation discusses strategic and execution ideas for success in emerging markets for western multinationals, international investors, and new multinationals being created from emerging markets.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides
Spring 2011 Presentation Summary
Spring 2011 Presentation Video

Related HBS Programs:
Building Businesses in Emerging Markets


Macroeconomic Policy and US Competitiveness

Moderated by Professor Jan W. Rivkin
Professor Richard H.K. Vietor
Assistant Professor Matthew C. Weinzierl
Mr. Ashraf M. Dahod (MBA 1981), Cisco Systems, Inc.
Mr. Joseph B. Fuller (MBA 1981), Monitor Group
Less Info

Friday, September 23; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.

Across the political spectrum, there is consensus that the United States faces challenges to its competitiveness. Current US fiscal policy is, unfortunately, part of the problem rather than the solution. We highlight several failures of current policy that ought to command, we believe, general agreement across party lines and political persuasions. These are: insufficient investments in the public goods that are integral to high productivity, unrealistic long-term spending commitments, distortionary and uncertain taxes, declining social mobility, and unsustainable domestic and international trade deficits. We also offer a few recommendations on how to turn fiscal policy to the country's advantage.


In Search of Common Sense, Competence and Character

Professor William A. Sahlman
Less Info

Friday, September 23; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.
Friday, June 3; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

This session will focus on some of the difficult fiscal and political challenges confronting the US. Among other topics, we will explore the roots of the recent financial crisis, healthcare reform, the rate of investment in new technologies, and some thoughts about the path forward for business leaders, politicians and citizens.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Video


Regulating Modern Finance

Professor David S. Scharfstein
Less Info

Friday, September 23; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

One of the causes of the financial crisis was inadequate regulation of the modern financial system, a system that evolved over the last thirty years from a bank-based model to a market-based model. The Dodd-Frank Act and Basel III are attempts to keep pace with innovations in the financial system. We will discuss these initiatives and other approaches to regulating modern finance including reform of housing finance.


Hard Assets in Age of Uncertainty

Professor Arthur I. Segel
Less Info

Friday, September 23; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.
Saturday, June 4; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

Discussion of real estate, farmland and gold investing during uncertain economic times.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides
Spring 2011 Presentation Slides


Jump Start Your Revenue Growth<

Emeritus Professor Benson P. Shapiro
Less Info

Friday, September 23; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.
Friday, June 3; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.

Your company has already cut costs and survived what, for most firms, has been a brutal economic time. Performance is improving, but not as quickly as you would like. Now to increase profits and enterprise value, and to insure a strong market position, it is imperative that you grow your top-line revenue quickly and efficiently. You need to increase unit sales and/or prices on a tight budget and a fast schedule.

In this practical reunion session, Professor Ben Shapiro will help you:

  • identify the best targets of opportunity
  • avoid brutal head-to-head price competition
  • price effectively to improve profitability without sacrificing unit volume
  • improve the focus, effectiveness and efficiency of your total go-to-market activities including e-commerce and traditional approaches
  • sell better and faster

The material is based on a continuing research program on high profit, high performance, "lean" marketing and sales.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides


Seven Strategy Questions: A Simple Approach for Better Execution

Professor Robert L. Simons
Less Info

Friday, September 23; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.
Saturday, June 4; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

Executing strategy requires tough choices. Unfortunately, many managers avoid choosing in the mistaken belief that they can have it all. Instead of focusing on one primary customer, they try to serve many different types of customers. Instead of instilling values that prioritize the interests of shareholders, customers, and employees, they develop lists of aspirational attributes. Instead of focusing on what could cause their strategy to fail, they build complex scorecards with an overload of measures. The result: disappointing performance and declining market position. To guard against these risks, we will review the seven strategy questions that all executives (and directors) should ask to ensure that business leaders are making the tough choices that ensure successful strategy execution—and winning in highly-competitive, global markets.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides
Spring 2011 Presentation Summary
Spring 2011 Presentation Slides
Spring 2011 Presentation Video


Becoming a Harvard MBA: Lessons from the Class of 2006

Senior Lecturer Scott A. Snook
Less Info

Friday, June 3; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

We advertise Harvard Business School as a "transformational leader development experience," with a mission "to educate leaders who make a difference in the world." I was curious: Is it indeed transformational? If so, how so? From what into what? What are the mechanisms of change? Aside from learning how to do a discounted cash flow, how are we different in a deeper sense as a result of our two years here? In this seminar, I will share what I learned from my longitudinal study of approximately 50 students from the HBS Class of 2006. By listening closely to what they told me, I gained some insight into what it truly means to "Become a Harvard MBA."


Just Enough: Enduring Success

Professor Howard H. Stevenson
Less Info

Friday, June 3; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.

Harvard Business School graduates have achieved many different kinds of success as leaders of businesses, as entrepreneurs and in their public and private lives. After authoring or co-authoring 150 cases and serving on many corporate and nonprofit boards, Howard Stevenson's most recent research has focused on observing the patterns in peoples' lives that create enduring success. The observations made by Stevenson and his co-author, Laura Nash, differ from those in the current rash of "how to" books that offer simple solutions to the problem of living "the good life." Their conclusion is that "it is not about balance" and it is not about maximization. It's about knowing how to define "enough" for today, tomorrow, and the rest of your life. Stevenson and Nash have identified the four essential categories around which people define success and have developed a model for knowing when life becomes too focused on a narrow set of success goals. Stevenson will discuss the model and how to calibrate your actions toward a more enduring success."

Related Resources:
Spring 2011 Presentation Video


Project Antares Brings High-Impact Interventions to Low-Income Populations: A collaboration between HBS and the Harvard School of Public Health

Professors Howard H. Stevenson and Michael Chu
Less Info

Saturday, June 4; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

Can a $25 incubator change health prospects for newborns in Nepal—and earn back enough money for its manufacturer to turn a profit and hew to its humanitarian mission?

That's the kind of challenge that Project Antares, a unique collaboration between the Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Business School, seeks to address. Project Antares aims to combat public health threats that disproportionately affect poor families, and build on those successes by developing curricula to train leaders in business, public health, and policy. Under the Project's auspices, students from HBS and HSPH have conducted 13 field studies in nine countries. These studies have included not only efforts to distribute $25 incubators in Nepal, but campaigns to fine-tune a primary health care model in rural India that empowers "village health champions"; and to leverage a microfinance effort to deliver health services to women in Bolivia, Nicaragua, and Peru through an organization called Pro Mujer.

Launched four years ago with the guidance of HBS Professor Howard Stevenson and through a gift from primary donor Roslyn Braeman Payne, HBS 1970, along with support from the Brinson Foundation, the Project focuses on commercial approaches to delivering high-impact health interventions to low-income populations. Now Payne has made an additional pledge to join with others to ensure that the Project can continue its quest for enlightened and cost-effective public health interventions that can be sustained as for-profit ventures, rather than relying on continual government support or uncertain grant funding.

"Countries with thoughtful public health policies and systems help create wealth for their people," says Payne. "Public health is one of the most successful forms of global leverage, and Project Antares is trying to accelerate this leverage through original research, teaching, and collaboration with various organizations. I am honored to be a part of a very special effort with a very special team."

The project is co-directed by David Bloom, Clarence James Gamble Professor of Economics and Demography at HSPH, and Michael Chu, Senior Lecturer at Harvard Business School. Chu and Bloom have set several goals for the project for the next few years, including teaching a joint course at HSPH and HBS based on the findings from Project Antares.

Senior Lecturer Michael Chu, Professor Howard Stevenson, and Roslyn Payne will discuss Project Antares, the collaboration between the two schools at Harvard University, and the "lessons learned" for the future.


The Moral Leader: Lessons from Moral Leadership in Action

Professor Sandra J. Sucher
Less Info

Friday, September 23; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

Dean Nohria urges you to be a leader of competence and character but what, exactly, does that entail? In this multimedia talk we will look for clues in the actions of three different leaders at moments of deep institutional crisis and personal challenge.

Their leadership tasks are diverse: waging war; running a major newspaper; managing the affairs of a nation. Yet all three were able to make crucial decisions, take action, and lead themselves and others while staying true to their own values. From their lives, experiences and example we will draw surprising insights and practical lessons about the exercise of moral leadership.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides
Fall 2011 Presentation Video


What's New at HBS in 2011: Knowledge-Based Strategy

Professor Hirotaka Takeuchi
Less Info

Friday, June 3; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

A new second-year course, Knowledge-Based Strategy, kicked off within the Strategy Unit in 2011. It complements the required Strategy course in the first-year program by looking at strategy development from a more subjective, context-specific, and future-oriented perspective. The objective of the course/this session is to make students/you realize what it takes to become a well-rounded strategist. They/you have to be many things at the same time:

  • A philosopher who grasps the essence of a problem and draws general conclusions from random observations
  • A master craftsman who understands the key issues of the moment and acts on them immediately
  • An idealist who will do what they believe is right and good for the company and society
  • A politician who can spur people to action
  • A novelist who uses metaphors, stories, and rhetoric
  • A teacher with good values and strong principles, from whom others want to learn

The Harvard Innovation Lab — An Update

Professors Peter Tufano and Joseph B. Lassiter
Less Info

Saturday, June 4; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

The University is launching the Harvard innovation lab to encourage entrepreneurship and innovation throughout the University. The i-lab will seek initially to bring together interested parties at the Business School (HBS), the School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS), the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS), the Kennedy School of Government (KSG), the Law School (HLS) and hopefully extending to the other schools in the future. Located on Western Avenue in the old WBGH studio next to HBS, the innovation lab will provide physical space and extensive IT support to foster team-based entrepreneurial activities, classroom space for project-oriented courses, lectures, and direct access to entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, lawyers, product development experts, and other friends of Harvard who have volunteered to provide their expertise to our community.

Related Resources:
Spring 2011 Presentation Summary
Spring 2011 Presentation Slides
Spring 2011 Presentation Video


Treasury Bonds: Inflation Bets or Deflation Hedges? The Treasury Bond Market "Bubble."

Professor Luis M. Viceira
Less Info

Friday, June 3; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.

There is considerable debate today as to whether the US Treasury bond market is moving into bubble territory. This talk examines these claims in light of what factors move bond yields, and the history of the Treasury bond market in the US postwar period.


Deficits and Debt in the USA

Professor Richard H.K. Vietor
Less Info

Saturday, September 24; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

This presentation, after a brief background on US economic strategies in the Reagan, Bush, Clinton and Bush eras, focuses on America's twin deficits in the 2000s. It will examine the causes of our fiscal deficits, our current account deficit, and the recent congressional compromise on the debt ceiling. It will conclude by forecasting deficits in the next 10 years, and by considering an alternative to congressional action.


The Founder's Dilemmas: Anticipating and Avoiding the Pitfalls That Can Sink a Startup

Associate Professor Noam T. Wasserman
Less Info

Friday, September 23; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.
Friday, June 3; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

Noam Wasserman's MBA elective examines the difficult early decisions founders face that have long-term implications for them and their ventures. The core dilemmas include career dilemmas ("when to found?"), founding-team dilemmas, and investor and successor dilemmas. These decisions have long-term implications for venture growth, for splintering of the founding team, for maintaining control of the venture, and for financial gains. The course integrates new cases with academic research based on data collected over the last decade from 4,000 private ventures, and is the basis for an upcoming book (The Founder's Dilemmas). The course was awarded both the HBS Teaching Award and the Academy of Management's Innovation in Entrepreneurial Pedagogy Award, and in 2011 was named by Inc. magazine as one of the top ten entrepreneurship courses in the country.

Related HBS Programs:
Key Executives Program
Launching New Ventures
Owner/President Management Program
Turnaround Management Strategies


Are We on the Cusp of a New World Economic Order?

Professors Louis T. Wells and Rawi E. Abdelal
Moderated by Senior Lecturer Jim Sharpe
Less Info

Friday, September 23; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

The current economic superpowers, Japan, Western Europe, and the US, are experiencing low birth rates and aging populations both of which are likely to constrain their future abilities to grow. Who will be the winners and losers in this new environment? Will the current economic superpowers stagnate? Will one or more of the BRICs—Brazil, Russia, India and China—take their place? How will the increasing influence of the BRICs affect international business rules and governing institutions: the WTO (for trade and intellectual property), ICSID and other protections for foreign investors, and the governance of the international capital flows? Are multinational firms that have their origins in the BRICs "different" from those with origins in Europe, the US, and Japan? If so, how, and what are the implications for the traditional multinationals? Professor Louis T. Wells and Professor Rawi E. Abdelal both of whom teach in the Business, Government, and International Economy group at HBS will lead a discussion of these important issues.


The Digital Revolution: How Technology is Changing the World

Professor David B. Yoffie
Less Info

Friday, September 23; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.
Friday, June 3; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.

Cloud computing, social networking, the explosion of smartphones and tablets, and the drive to connect all digital products together are having a profound impact on management, strategies, and the way we live our lives. This session will explore the underlying drivers of technological change, the critical trends in technology today, and the impact this revolution will have on tomorrow.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides
Spring 2011 Presentation Summary
Spring 2011 Presentation Slides


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Alumni Career Hub & Suite of Career Offerings

Ms. Christine Sullivan, Director of Alumni Career & Professional Development
Less Info

Saturday, June 4; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

Whether you're currently engaged in a job search or just thinking about it, now you can put the power of a newly launched career tool to use. Alumni Career Hub encompasses the next generation job bank, provides new user tools and functionality and allows you to manage your career activities from a centralized dashboard. Come hear about the latest contribution to a robust suite of career offerings. Interested in starting a business? Thinking about a new career direction? Seeking a Board position? At every professional crossroads, Alumni Career & Professional Development offers the tools, resources and services to help you achieve your career goals.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 ACPD Resource Overview


Campus Tour

James E. Aisner, Director of Media Relations, Harvard Business School
Less Info

Friday, September 23; 2:15 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

How did Baker Library|Bloomberg Center get its name? What's the difference between George F. Baker and George P. Baker? What's a WAC and where's the WAC chute? Why is the Class of 1959 Chapel cylindrical? Where's the new Innovation Lab? Take a leisurely walk around the campus and hear some entertaining historical facts about HBS you never knew before. Meet on the north side of Baker|Bloomberg, facing the Charles River.


A View Into the HBS Schwartz Art Collection

Sharon C. Black, Director of Planning, Harvard Business School
Less Info

Saturday, September 24; 11:45 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

The Schwartz art collection at HBS consists of over 200 pieces of contemporary art. You'll get to know a bit about the donor, our selection process, and see a selection of individual pieces. If the group size is small enough, we can also take a brief walking tour—if larger, I'll make suggestions for a self-guided tour.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides


Believe It. Live It.

Vaughn Brock
Less Info

Friday, September 23; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.
Saturday, June 4; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

More than words. A way of living. From the beaches of Normandy to the streets of Fallujah, in a downtown alleyway and a country tree house, at a running track and on a stage ... in these places and others in between, we join a crew of young men as they discover what it means to believe and live by the values of being trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent. Brock (MBA 1985) created the video Believe It. Live It and study guide to explore these values as we meet a Rwandan genocide survivor, an Iraq war hero, a US Army rescue helicopter unit and other everyday people who personify these values in their daily life—those who truly "Believe It. Live It."

Related Resources:
Believe It. Live It. (video)


Transforming the Education Sector through Leadership

Elizabeth City, Executive Director, Harvard Doctor of Education Leadership Program
Less Info

Friday, September 23; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

At the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE), we believe that the single most promising strategy for transforming American education is to recruit, develop, and place talented and skilled leaders in school systems, non-profit organizations, mission-based for-profit organizations, philanthropic organizations, and government agencies—what some have called the "Fortune 300" jobs in education. HGSE's new Doctorate in Education Leadership (Ed.L.D.) is a full-time, practice-based program for PK-12 system-level leaders. Faculty from HGSE, the Harvard Business School, and the Harvard Kennedy School designed and teach in the program, which features a new customized curriculum of classes, modules, and practice-based experiences. The three-year program began in August 2010 and is a game-changer in the education sector.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides


Diversity in the New Millenium

Lisa M. Coleman, PhD
Chief Diversity Officer and Special Assistant to the President, Harvard University
Less Info

Friday, September 23; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.

This presentation will focus on diversity initiatives at Harvard with particular emphasis on the business imperative.


The World of Business Information at Your Fingertips — Baker Library Isn't Just for Course Work Anymore!

Ms. Ann Cullen
Less Info

Saturday, September 24; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.
Saturday, June 4; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

Researching a new trend? Exploring a new idea? Reevaluating your personal, career, or professional goals? Baker Library Services is here to help. Come to this program to learn about the wide variety of Baker Library services and resources available to you. A case scenario will be used to facilitate a discussion that will take you step by step in thinking through how to productively and effectively approach research. This session will extend the "Baker Library Alumni Service Overview" presentation offered earlier this morning.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 — Baker Library: Resources and Research
Fall 2011 — Baker Library: Alumni Portal
Fall 2011 — Baker Library Case
Spring 2011 Alumni Services Overview
Spring 2011 Knowledge and Library Services Overview


The Business of Stem Cells

Dr. George Q. Daley
Less Info

Saturday, June 4; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

Dr. Daley will recount the scientific, ethical and public policy developments in the fast-paced field of stem cells and regenerative medicine and implications for current and future commercial opportunities.


Your $1,000 Genome

Kevin Davies PhD, Founding editor of Bio-IT World and author of The $1,000 Genome
Less Info

Saturday, September 24; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m. Saturday, June 4; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

In 2007, James Watson, who co-discovered the double helix structure of DNA, received the first personal genome sequence for about $1 million. Today, the cost of reading a person's complete DNA sequence has dropped to less than $10,000, the result of an ongoing technological revolution that is outstripping Moore's Law. Today, anybody with a doctor's note can get their genome sequenced for $10-20,000. Meanwhile, tens of thousands of people have enjoyed the information provided by personal genomics companies such as Google-backed 23andMe. Kevin Davies, the author of The $1,000 Genome and a regular guest at HBS alumni reunions, will share his experiences in decoding his own genome, spotlight the next generation of sequencing systems and their growing impact in the clinic, and discuss the medical impact and ethical implications of personal genomics.

Related Resources:
Spring 2011 Presentation Slides


Women Board Members and Stock Performance: Are Institutional Investors Biased?

Professor Frank Dobbin, Faculty of Arts and Sciences
Less Info

Friday, September 23; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

Women make up a sixth of corporate board members in the Fortune 500. Some analysts predicted that they would boost financial performance and stock price by making boards more effective. Indeed, early studies showed a correlation between women on boards and both profits and stock price. But more rigorous studies have suggested suggest that women have little little effect on profits and may have negative effects on stock price. We explore why women may have adverse effects on stock price, finding little evidence that they undermine board effectiveness, but some evidence that institutional investors may disfavor firms that appoint women board members.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides


First, Do No Harm: HBS Alumni, the MBA Oath, and Leading in the Era of Deepwater Drilling, Climate Change and Corporations that are Too Big to Fail

Ms. Elizabeth A. Doty (MBA 1991)
Less Info

Saturday, June 4; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

The global financial crisis of 2008 involved so many professionals in so many industries and caused such massive disruption that it forces us to question our basic assumptions about ethics and integrity. Why do the scandals continue to escalate despite our best efforts to educate, inspire and enforce higher standards?

The pattern is doubly mystifying because so many leaders want to create real value. Thousands have signed the MBA Oath. Most of us know the challenges of the 21st century demand a longer term view toward true economic, social and environmental sustainability. What does it take to live up to these values under pressure? Can we at least "do no harm"?

Please join us for a provocative and timely conversation.

Related Resources
Spring 2011 Presentation Slides


Green Campus Tour

Meghan Duggan, Assistant Director, Sustainability & Energy Management
Less Info

Friday, September 23; 2:15 p.m. –3:30 p.m.

In 2008, President Drew Faust announced that Harvard University would reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions 30% by 2016 using 2006 as a baseline and including all future growth. As of fiscal year 2010, HBS has reduced GHG emissions by 34% and reduced energy consumption by 21% (compared to baseline). All of this has been accomplished through:

  • multiple energy conservation measures (over 100)
  • smart planning and construction (8 LEED certified buildings)
  • increased awareness created by behavioral change programs like Green Living & Green Teams
  • improved waste management that has assisted with a 60% recycling rate

Shad Hall—the HBS Athletic Facility—is one of the many contributors to our success and will be the focal point of the 'green' tour. It was a 2010 Green Business Award recipient and includes features such as a green roof, photo voltaic (solar) panels, a 75kW cogeneration unit that generates onsite power, GreenRev technology (which harnesses human energy through spin bikes and puts it back into the grid), and smart eco-ballast lighting technology.


The Challenge of the Changing Workforce

Tamara J. Erickson (MBA 1978), President, The Concours Institute
Less Info

Saturday, September 24; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.
Saturday, June 4; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

Seismic shifts are occurring in the workforce. Over the next several years, the number of jobs created could begin to outstrip the number of people who desire to participate in the workforce. And, values toward "work" are changing. Today four generations are working together—each bringing different experiences and assumptions to the job. These and other changes will affect the relationships we forge with employees, the opportunities ahead for us and our children, our approaches to education, our philosophies toward retirement, and the fundamental way we live out our lives.

In this provocative and fun session, Tammy offers a deep understanding of the composition of the future workforce, characteristics and expectations of the four generations in today's workforce, and actions to attract and retain great talent.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Reunion Presentation
Spring 2011 Presentation Summary
Spring 2011 Presentation Video


Who's Got Your Back: Building Relationships for Success in Life

Mr. Keith E. Ferrazzi (MBA 1992)
Less Info

Saturday, June 4; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

Keith Ferrazzi presents Who's Got Your Back, a breakthrough program to build deep, trusting relationships that create success—and won't let you fail. In this interactive keynote, participants will learn:

  • The Four Mindsets to building deeper, more trusting "lifeline relationships"
  • Tips and tools for overcoming the careers — crippling habits that hold us back
  • How to set goals in a dramatically more powerful way
  • Why we should replace "yes men" in our lives with those who get it and care — and will hold us accountable to achieving our goals
  • How to lower our guards and let others help

None of us can do it alone. We need the perspective and advice of a trusted team. In this presentation, Keith Ferrazzi shows us how to put our own "dream team" together.

Related Resources:
Spring 2011 Presentation Summary


Health Care Reform: Without a Correct Diagnosis, There Is No Cure

Jeffrey S. Flier, M.D
Less Info

Friday, June 3; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

A persistent headache is a symptom, but the underlying cause can be anything from a migraine to a brain tumor. Good medicine means identifying and treating the cause as well as the symptom. The same is true in health care reform.

Though most Americans are satisfied with their own health care, they also see the need for substantial reform. Unfortunately, the well-meaning plan passed last year by Congress was the wrong therapy because it mistook the symptoms for the underlying disease. Nearly everyone agrees on the symptoms: rapidly growing health expenditures, diminished access to affordable insurance causing many to be uninsured, and inadequate quality and outcomes for the dollars spent. But what are the root causes? I will discuss my view of these causes, how they are not addressed by current legislation, and what might conceivably be done about it.


World Health: Global Concern and University Priority

Professor Sue Goldie, MD, MPH, Director, Harvard Global Health Institute
Less Info

Saturday, September 24; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

Despite remarkable improvements in world health, we are witnessing worsening inequalities and intense changes in demographics, disease patterns, and the flow of global risks. Just as health has become relevant to foreign policy, national security and economic development, the complexity of 21st century global health challenges extend beyond one discipline or methodology. We will discuss why a global health outlook is necessary for professionals outside the health sector, from those in business, law, and education to engineering, design and environmental science. We argue that new problems accompanying the social, economic, and political changes of globalization will require multi-disciplinary contributions, coordinated global action, and new ways of relating to global colleagues and to each other. While emphasizing the importance of a shared conceptual foundation of global health, we will describe the strategic vision of the Harvard Global Health Institute, established by President Faust in 2010, and new models of cross-university collaboration. By harnessing the intellectual breadth, creativity and entrepreneurial spirit of the 12 Harvard faculties, the university can make game-changing contributions to global health.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides


MBA Hives Tours

Gabe Handel, Managing Director, Dean's Office
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Saturday, September 24; 9:00 a.m. –9:45 a.m.

Saturday, September 24; 11:15 a.m. –12:00 p.m.

What will students do in the new RC Field Immersion Experiences for Leadership Development (FIELD) course, and what facilities will support their new learning experiences? Gabe Handel, Managing Director in the Dean's Office, will share an overview of FIELD, followed by a tour of the new MBA "Hive" classrooms at 125 Western Avenue.


Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard: A New Model for Technology Innovation and Collaboration

Donald E. Ingber, MD, PhD
Wyss Institute; Harvard Medical School; Harvard School of Engineering & Applied Sciences
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Saturday, June 4; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University was launched on January 1, 2009 with the single largest philanthropic gift in Harvard's history—$125 million—from HBS alumnus Hansjorg Wyss. The mission of the Wyss Institute is to discover the engineering principles that Nature uses to build living things, and to harness these insights to create biologically inspired materials and devices to advance human health and create a more sustainable world. The Wyss Institute creates bioinspired materials and devices that will revolutionize medicine and enhance sustainability by emulating the way Nature builds. Working as an alliance among the schools of Harvard University, its affiliated hospitals and neighboring academic institutions, the Institute has developed a new model for technology innovation and collaboration that crosses institutional and disciplinary barriers. Institute faculty and staff engage in high-risk research that leads to transformative breakthroughs. The biological principles uncovered are harnessed to develop new engineering solutions for healthcare, energy, architecture, robotics and manufacturing. These technologies are translated into commercial products and therapies through collaborations with clinical investigators, corporate alliances and new start-ups.

The Institute is structured explicitly to enable science and technology development in an environment that supports commercialization and accelerates translation of discoveries into commercial products. It was launched by bringing together fourteen of Harvard's and Boston's most brilliant and adventurous scientists and engineers, most of whom already have a proven track-record in interdisciplinary collaboration and entrepreneurship, and we recruited administrative leaders who had extensive start-up experience. Rather than using investigator-driven grant funding mechanisms, Institute scientific operations were organized around six Enabling Technology Platforms that provide funds to support people, equipment, supplies and facilities that are designed to enable groups of faculty, Institute staff and collaborators to develop entirely new technological capabilities that will break open new fields of research and technology development which will benefit all. We weave in expert technical staff with past industrial experience in product development and team management who take on leadership positions in terms of self-organizing product development teams composed of students, fellows and staff from multiple faculty laboratories once a high value application is identified. To further facilitate multi-disciplinary collaboration and ensure synergy across Institute Platforms, we organized our laboratory facilities as "Collaboratories" rather than allocating space to individual faculty or principal investigators. Students and staff from one faculty member's group might be located at entirely different sites at the Institute (e.g., different ends of the same floor in Boston or at our Cambridge site) depending on the project and Platform on which they are participating. In addition, by formalizing a Collaboration Agreement with all of our consortium institutions, industrial partners can develop a single research partnership agreement with the Institute and have access to world-leading faculty from multiple independent institutions; this has been viewed a huge advantage in our collaborations with industry.


Harvard Innovation Lab Tour

Gordon Jones, Director, Harvard Innovation Lab
Less Info

Saturday, September 24; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.
Saturday, September 24; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

We invite you to a preview tour of the Harvard Innovation Lab, located on the Harvard Business School campus. The Harvard Innovation Lab is a Harvard University initiative meant to foster team-based and entrepreneurial activities, and deepen interactions among students, faculty, entrepreneurs, and members of the Allston and Greater Boston community. The i-lab itself is located in the building that once housed WGBH-TV's studios and has been renovated into an inviting open-floor plan concept.

With leadership from HBS and support from six other schools across Harvard, the i-lab promises to be a thriving environment for Harvard students to learn, do, and grow their innovative and entrepreneurial ideas. The i-lab is a combination of open workspace, classroom, conference rooms, workshop, and includes a 3D printer!

Please join us for a tour of our collaborative entrepreneurship space prior to its official opening in November.


Reinventing the Harvard Art Museums

Thomas W. Lentz, Elizabeth and John Moors Cabot Director, Harvard Art Museums
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Friday, September 23; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

Far more than a building plan, this project is an essential reinvention of the Harvard Art Museums, a rethinking of the museums' role in the community and the place of the arts in an advanced education. This project is designed to make our world-renowned collections more accessible as tools for teaching and learning, integrate them more fully into the curriculum and into student life, and encourage their use in the university's increasingly interdisciplinary programs. The new building will help us fulfill these goals and allow us to better serve students, faculty, scholars, and the public.

In collaboration with world-renowned architect Renzo Piano, we are creating a single state-of-the-art facility that will bring together the three museums—Fogg, Busch-Reisinger, and Arthur M. Sackler—while allowing them to maintain their distinct identities. The new facility will seamlessly combine the landmark 1927 building, a striking new addition on its east side (along Prescott Street), and a new glass rooftop structure that will bridge old and new.

Related Resources:
Renovation and Background


Transforming the Education Sector through Leadership

Dean Kathleen McCartney, Harvard Graduate School of Education
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Saturday, June 4; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

At the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE), we believe that the single most promising strategy for transforming American education is to recruit, develop, and place talented and skilled leaders in school systems, non-profit organizations, mission-based for-profit organizations, philanthropic organizations, and government agencies—what some have called the "Fortune 300" jobs in education. HGSE's new Doctorate in Education Leadership (Ed.L.D.) is a full-time, practice-based program for PK-12 system-level leaders. Faculty from HGSE, the Harvard Business School, and the Harvard Kennedy School designed and teach in the program, which features a new customized curriculum of classes, modules, and practice-based experiences. The three-year program began in August 2010 and is a game-changer in the education sector.


The Promise of Stem Cell Science

Professor Douglas Melton, Faculty of Arts and Sciences
Less Info

Saturday, September 24; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

Advances in stem cell science have moved closer to the development of new medicines and cellular transplantations for degenerative diseases. This science of how our bodies are made and maintained by stem cells is also opening a door to regeneration and a life of healthy ageing.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides


Endowment Management in a Changing World

Jane Mendillo, President and CEO, Harvard Management Company
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Friday, September 23; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

The Harvard Management Company (HMC) is solely dedicated to the management of Harvard University's endowment and related assets. With approximately 35% of the University's annual budget dependent on endowment income, HMC's goal is to generate strong, sustainable investment returns to support the needs and goals of the University. Over the last twenty years HMC's average annual return of 11.9% is substantially better than the 7.8% earned by a 60/40 stock/bond portfolio and the 9.3% annual return for the endowment's Policy Portfolio benchmark. HMC benefits by a employing a unique model of investment management, using both internal portfolio managers and traders as well as a select set of external investment management firms across a range of asset classes and geographies. This hybrid approach gives Harvard several advantages as an investor, from significant cost savings associated with internal management, to greater degrees of market insight and increased nimbleness in moving among investments.


Harvard Management Company Update

Jane Mendillo, President and CEO, Harvard Management Company
Less Info

Friday, June 3; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

The Harvard Management Company (HMC) is solely dedicated to the management of Harvard University's endowment and related assets. With approximately 35% of the University's annual budget dependent on endowment income, HMC's goal is to generate strong, sustainable investment returns to support the needs and goals of the University. Over the last twenty years HMC's average annual return of 11.9% is substantially better than the 7.8% earned by a 60/40 stock/bond portfolio and the 9.3% annual return for the endowment's Policy Portfolio benchmark. HMC benefits by a employing a unique model of investment management, using both internal portfolio managers and traders as well as a select set of external investment management firms across a range of asset classes and geographies. This hybrid approach gives Harvard several advantages as an investor, from significant cost savings associated with internal management, to greater degrees of market insight and increased nimbleness in moving among investments.


What Boards are Looking For in the Year Ahead

Julie Norris (MBA/JD 1993), Partner, CTPartners
Christine Sullivan, Director, Alumni Career and Professional Development
Less Info

Saturday, September 24; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

Boards are under pressure from shareholders and other constituencies to oversee corporate performance in a still uncertain economy. Traditional sources of director talent are drying up, and active CEOs are less able to serve on outside boards than before. Do you have the skills and expertise that corporate boards are looking for? This session will provide an overview of current trends and offer suggestions for finding and evaluating board opportunities. Key takeaways will include:

  • How to develop a game plan to make yourself more visible to boards
  • Questions you should ask when considering joining a board
  • Qualities and experiences boards are looking for in new directors
  • Understanding the process boards use to find directors

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides


Iraq and Afghanistan: Explaining the Past and Anticipating the Future

Professor Meghan O'Sullivan, Harvard Kennedy School
Less Info

Saturday, September 24; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

The involvement of the United States in both Iraq and Afghanistan has been longer, and harder, than many people anticipated. Is this due to the inherent difficulty of the challenge undertaken? Or was it the result of certain policies and decisions made over the course of the past decade? I will focus on a few key decisions, their origins and their impact on the trajectory of subsequent events, and what they mean for the future.


Building Healthy Children and a Successful Society in the Media Age

Michael O. Rich, MD, MPH
Less Info

Saturday, June 4; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

Revolutionary media technologies and their innovative applications have transformed our world in ways both exhilarating and unpredictable. Children and adolescents, the future of our society, are early adopters and enthusiastic users of rapidly evolving interactive screen media from televisions to the Internet to smartphones. Their childhood is dramatically different even from older siblings. Harvard pediatrician Michael Rich abandons the long-running values versus free expression stalemate to examine measurable influences and outcomes of media exposure on children's physical, mental, and social health. Rigorous medical and psychological science demonstrates how children learn from and are changed by their use of contemporary media and how we can guide their media use so they are not harmed, but become better connected, educated, and prepared for their accelerating, ever-shrinking world.


Neuroscience and the Roots of Human Capital Development: Implications for Economic Productivity and Corporate Responsibility

Dr. Jack P. Shonkoff
Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University; Harvard School of Public Health
Less Info

Friday, September 23; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

There is a broad understanding that the current explosion of knowledge in neuroscience, molecular biology, and genomics is fueling investment in new technologies that will revolutionize the way we treat disease. Less appreciated is the extent to which this same science could inform more effective approaches to education reform, workforce development, health promotion, crime prevention, and the reduction of intergenerational poverty. This session will provide an overview of the science of early childhood and early brain development for business leaders who are interested in strengthening the US workforce, building human capital in developing countries, and leveraging scientific advances to generate innovative solutions to enduring societal problems as a new strategy for corporate responsibility.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides


Winning in Emerging Markets

Mr. Scott C. Smith(MBA 1991)
Less Info

Saturday, June 4; 10:00 a.m. –11:15 a.m.

HBS 1991 Grad, Scott C. Smith—CEO. of OPFLEX SOLUTIONS and CELLECT TECHNOLOGIES—will be presenting the tumultuous story of his unique, proprietary, and patent-pending absorbent foam, OPFLEXTM, from its 'birth' to the unprecedented low-carbon-impact efficiency Opflex exhibited in the oil disasters in The Gulf of Mexico and Dalian, China, and in waste water discharge in the United States. A live demonstration of the extremely effective nature of OPFLEX will be performed with the help of some very special guests.


Give Smart: Philanthropy That Gets Results

Mr. Thomas J. Tierney (MBA 1980) (MBA 1991)
Less Info

Saturday, June 4; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

Philanthropy represents an opportunity to make an unprecedented impact in our world; Americans donated approximately $300 billion in 2010, and in the first half of the twenty-first century giving to family and community foundations alone will be ten times in today's dollars what it was throughout the entire twentieth century. More than 50 billionaires have joined Warren Buffett and Bill and Melinda Gates' Giving Pledge to donate half their fortunes, commitments that are estimated to total over $600 billion. We are poised at the brink of a historic wealth transfer. And the giving is more than financial—service programs like Teach for America and City Year are rapidly becoming premier choices for America's top college graduates while more and more trailing boomers are opting for "encore careers," postponing retirement to pursue work that creates social impact.

But tremendous innovation in the social sector and the best of intentions are not enough—because of its very nature, philanthropy regularly underperforms. How do you ensure these generous gifts of time and money are as effective as they can be? Almost a decade ago, Thomas J. Tierney began tackling these and other tough questions on how to strengthen the social sector when he left Bain & Company to co-found the Bridgespan Group, a nonprofit focused on helping donors and nonprofits to maximize their impact. Over the past 10 years it has advised "both sides of the grant"—philanthropists, leading foundations and hundreds of nonprofits from Peter and Jennifer Buffett's NoVo foundation to the Harlem Children's Zone—on how to work together in achieving the changes they envision in the world. Now, in Give Smart, Tierney distills ten years of Bridgespan's experience, knowledge, and case studies with philanthropy expert Joel L. Fleishman's research and insights to create a much-needed primer for philanthropists and the nonprofit organizations they support.

Philanthropy is personal and situational and there is no magic formula for one's philanthropic work; the path to results is through wrestling with the right questions at the right time. Give Smart asks six challenging, thought-provoking questions to guide donors through the process of determining personally fulfilling philanthropic pursuits designed to achieve results—from the first moments of excitement and possibility to clarifying goals and the concrete steps needed to achieve them; and from finding and working with the right partner organizations to analyzing results.

A how-to-do-it Gospel of Wealth for 21st century philanthropists, Give Smart presents the definitive guide for engaged donors and nonprofit leaders to achieve real, lasting change in the world.

Related Resources:
Spring 2011 Presentation Summary
Spring 2011 Presentation Video


What Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Would Want Us To Know About Health Care Disparities

Augustus A. White, III, MD, PhD, Professor, Harvard Medical School
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Saturday, September 24; 11:45 a.m. –1:00 p.m.

If you're going to have a heart attack, an organ transplant, or a joint replacement, here's the key to getting the very best medical care: be a white, straight, middle-class male. Dr. White, a pioneering black surgeon, takes on one of the few critically important topics that haven't figured in the heated debate over health care reform—the largely hidden yet massive injustice of bias in medical treatment which causes health disparities in 13 groups of people in our nation.

Dr. White has conducted extensive research and interviews with leading physicians to show how subconscious stereotyping influences doctor-patient interactions, diagnosis, and treatment. He brings together insights from the worlds of social psychology, neuroscience, and clinical practice to define the issues clearly and, most importantly, outlines a concrete approach to fixing this fundamental inequity in the delivery of health care.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Slides


Dean Nitin Nohria

Watch Dean Nohria's welcome remarks to alumni for an update on HBS today.

Related Resources:
Fall 2011 Presentation Video
Spring 2011 Presentation Video